SimplyScripts.Com Logo

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Hannah’s Demons – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Hannah’s Demons
Hannah learns that running from her demons only makes things worse…

You can’t run away from your problems. This is something that Hannah learns quite literally in Hannah’s Demons, a disturbing thriller by talented screenwriter Warren Duncan.

Hannah is, by all definitions, a final girl in the vein of Jennifer Love Hewitt in I Know What You Did Last Summer or Sigourney Weaver in Alien. The difference is, we don’t know what horror Hannah has escaped from. We meet her alone in the woods in the middle of the night, torn clothes, ragged breathing and scared to death. Someone very persistent is chasing her and she can’t escape, no matter how fast or how far she runs.

That’s when she sees a cabin. Maybe someone is home. Maybe they will help her! Hannah pounds on the door and… nothing. With no other option, Hannah smashes a window and dives inside.

She takes quick inventory of her surroundings and arms herself with a kitchen knife. As her attacker enters the house, Hannah takes cover under the kitchen table. Hoping, praying, that her stalker doesn’t find her. Is she safe?

Nope.

Her pursuer begins searching the house, leaving no stone left unturned. He calls her name, “Hannah, you need to come home…”

She shakily holds the kitchen knife, waiting for the inevitable and…

What, did you think I was going to spoil it? Go read the script! Just know that not everything is what it seems in this story and that the script ends with a mind-bending twist guaranteed to keep you up at night.

Pages: 6

Budget: Low to medium. Two actors and one voice actor. A wooded area and a cabin. Knife, cell phone and flashlight for your props. If you live somewhere with lots of outdoor space or you want to take a nice camping trip this weekend, then you’re set.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the author: My first short, Lullaby, was picked up for production by Sinister Films two days after appearing on Simply Scripts. Filming will start later next month. For more information about my work, I can be reached at Warren_Duncan “AT” hotmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Interrogation – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Interrogation

An interrogator employs questionable methods to extract information from a suspect.

There’s something about a good torture scene that just… stays with you. You know what we’re talking’ about: the dentist scene from Marathon Man. The ear removal in Reservoir Dogs.

Yet, there’s a fine line between an exquisitely painful scene and gratuitous torture porn. Make no mistake – there is a difference. One is an example of high writerly art; admittedly of the squeamish kind. The other is pure sadism… the visual rendering of unpleasant corners of the human psyche that are best left unexpressed (or crushed by energetic bouts of electroshock.)

Ah, but when a scene is of that first variety? Cinematic stuff like that scars you for life – in a good way. And it’s impossible to forget. The visuals burrow into one’s mind like memory maggots, and take up permanent residence in one’s bleeding brain.

And that’s certainly the case with Interrogation, by Zach Jensen. A vicious little short, Interrogation takes place in – you guessed it – an interrogation room populated by two charming gentlemen: Agent Dawes and Simon – an unfortunate soul whose hand is strapped to the table. ‘Cause, you see, Agent Dawes has a hammer. And pliers. And an orange (don’t ask.) And really, really sharp paper.   And he knows how to use them. Not surprisingly, things get ugly.

Needless to say, the torture depicted is quite brutal. If that’s all this script had going for it, it’d still be memorable – and imaginative. But Interrogation does have more. The banter between Dawes and Simon is surprisingly witty. And mystery lingers in the air. Why is Simon there? And exactly what is Agent Dawes fishing for? Then there’s that twist. But never mind. I’ve said too much already…

If you’re a director with dark and twisted sensibilities, then you’d better open Interrogation quick. ‘Cause perps like Simon eventually crack. And scripts like this get optioned – causing delicious suffering along the way…

About the writer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota.  He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script.  If for some reason you want to learn more about him, you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog.

Pages: 6

Budget: Pretty low. But be sure not to skimp on a few solid practical FX. No need to show everything (subtlety can be a good thing.) But a touch of blood here and there will enhance your audience’s heebie-jeebies even more.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

The Bridge – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

The Bridge
There are over 600,000 bridges in the U.S. alone.
Four friends discover the horror that lurks beneath one of them.

We all remember that day in high school when your first friend obtained their driving license. All the locked doors of the world opened up wide for you and your gang. Leaving… no limits where you could go.

Well, unless the car stops working.

In The Bridge, this unwelcome situation is exactly where our four teenage adventurers find themselves: Billy (the driver), Shawn, Mark, and Katie.

As Fate would have it, they’ve broken down at the end of a rusty, metallic bridge. On a wet, cold night. It’s a bad situation, to say the least.

As it turns out, the mechanical illness that’s befallen their vehicle isn’t easily curable. All four tires are flat. Immediately, confusion reigns:

MARK
What’d you run over?

BILLY
Nothing! This is bullshit!

Requiring relief (both physically and mentally), Mark separates himself from the group, and finds an ideal spot over a railing in the center of the bridge.

Little does he know that’s the last time he’ll ever pee.

Thanks to the lack of lighting, the others don’t even know Mark’s disappeared. At least, until Katie realizes the sound of liquid has stopped.

So she goes over to the same spot.

And suffers the same fate as Mark.

Meanwhile, an oblivious Billy and Shawn argue over what their next course of action should be. When they finally reach a consensus, and call out to the others, they find silence. No answer comes.

So they walk across the bridge to find…

Will Billy and Shawn be the next victims? Can they escape a watery, bloody fate? What’s the actual danger that lurks in the dark? You’ll have to read this one and see.

Don’t let the single setting fool you. The sheer simplicity of this script offers horror directors endless creative possibilities. Pick this one up, and Bridge the gap between yourself and your next festival award!

Pages: 7

Budget: As with many horrors, directors have a choice to go for lots of FX, or imply things with atmosphere and shadows. The result: different possible budgets. It just depends where one wants to go.

About the Reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the Writer: Jordan became addicted to writing in 1995, when as a wee lad, his work garnered recognition among his professors. Since that time, he’s written several short scripts that have been received as “life changing”, “prophetic”, and “orgasmic”. As a finalist in the 72 Hour Script Fest, his words gave birth to the award winning film, Made For Each Other. Jordan doesn’t usually refer to himself in the third person, but when he does, he tends to embellish as evidenced above. He does however encourage people to make the world a better place by educating them through his writing, photography, and filmmaking. Please contact him at JLScripts79 at gmail dot com.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow
A bad marriage can turn some people into monsters…

Ever wonder how the most famous couples in fiction made it work after happily ever after? Couples like Tarzan and Jane, Anna and Kristoff, or… Frankenstein and his bride? Well, it might not be as blissful as you’d imagine.

That’s just where we meet Frankenstein and his bride in Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow: in marriage counseling, years after Mary Shelley’s story. Hey, even monsters have problems. He’s distant and literally emotionless, she’s tired of doing the same old things and just wants to go on a killer date (pun intended).

One thing they do agree on: they might be unhappy, but they’re not ready to be separated. “We were literally made for each other” Frankenstein pleads. So the marriage counselor dives in and a really monstrous couples therapy session begins.

As the truth comes out and secrets are revealed, the monster and his bride near a breakthrough… but it seems that every step forward leads to the couple taking two steps back. Will they make it? Not to spoil anything, but this story ends with a nice surprise… and this script is a bloody good time.

Pages: 8

Characters: 3 – Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, marriage counselor

Budget: Low to Mid. Really only two locations, three actors, but you may have to increase the makeup budget to make sure your Stein’s look appropriately gory. That being said, an experienced director with a great crew can make this one look hideous (in the best possible way!)

About the Reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the Writer, Dave Lambertson: I took up writing rather late in life having already been retired before I put pen to paper (okay – finger to computer key) for the first time. My favorite genres to read and write are dramedies and romantic comedies.

In addition to this short, I have written four features; “The Last Statesman” (a 2015 PAGE finalist and a Nicholl’s and BlueCat quarterfinalist), “The Beginning of The End and The End” (a PAGE Semi-Finalist). Taking Stock (a drama) and a new comedy – “Screw You Tube”. Want to learn more? Reach Dave at dlambertson “AT” hotmail! And visit his website at http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, July 8, 2016

Grammar Nazi Killer – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Grammar Nazi Killer
Your next grammatical error may be your last.

Okay, I’ll admit it. My high school grammar skills might be a little rusty. I may end a sentence with the occasional preposition. And I have been known to allow my participles to dangle in public. But, hey, no one’s perfect.

There is one place, it seems, the world’s worst grammatical offenders gather in droves – the internet. More specifically, social media.

Let’s face it. Most of the people on Facebook are not playing with an unabridged dictionary.

Grammar Nazi Killer, the new short script by James Barron, introduces a new villain to the slasher horror genre. A psychopath who kills in the name of proper sentence structure. A murderer who butchers those who butcher the English language. A monster who trolls the internet searching for his next illiterate victim.

True to the genre, our protagonists are a group of high school teens whose only crimes are stupidity and the overwhelming desire to investigate loud noises and dark rooms. And, of course, committing a grammatical error or two on-line.

Our first victim is Dwight, a normal, every-day kid who loves to watch porn in his basement. In his defense, I’m sure he’s limited to an hour, and only if his homework is finished. Imagine his surprise when a message flashes on his screen and it’s not an ad for horny housewives.

“Your writing is an affront to Grammar and the English language. Prepare to die!”

Spoiler alert, Dwight! Zip it up and get the hell out of there!

Amber Swift, a beautiful, blonde airhead Skypes with her hunky quarterback boyfriend Jason when she receives the same message on her computer after making the fatal flaw of being too cutesy with her word usage. After Amber’s error is “corrected,” Grammar Nazi Killer sets his sights on Jason. Will Jason be the next victim of bad grammar? Or can he somehow escape with his subject and predicate intact?

Grammar Nazi Killer is a horror script with its tongue firmly in cheek. Until it’s chopped off. Directors who are fans of the slasher genre should definitely take a stab at this one. This script is bloody good all the way to the last cut.

Pages: 14

Budget: Moderate. Not a big cast, but lots of gory FX. If you happen to have a couple barrels of blood in your basement, you’re half way there.

About the Reviewer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, and this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

About the Author: Newly discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Jessica’s Window – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Dane Whipple

Jessica’s Window
What secrets lie in the attic?

From a dusty and barren attic, thirteen-year-old Jessica Campell watches as her father packs their belongings into a U-Haul van. Tears stream down her face.

Her father, Mark Campell, is obviously no stranger to heartache himself. The dark circles under his eyes reveal he has spent many a night awake, nursing a hidden pain.

As Mark and his wife Laura make final preparations to depart, Jessica pounds relentlessly on the attic window, calling desperately to her parents. But no matter how hard she pounds or loud she cries, her parents can’t or won’t listen. Slowly, they drive away.

But despite being imprisoned, Jessica soon discovers she’s not alone. In the shadows of the attic, she’s met by eleven-year-old Sarah Meyers, a waif of a girl who assures Jessica things will get better. The two of them – she claims – will be good friends. But Sarah’s words are less than reassuring. As police cars and a news crew gather outside, Jessica’s concerns continue to grow.

What could have made Jessica’s parents leave her behind? Soon after the two meet, an eerie presence starts to stir… Just what is happening? Are these children even alone?

A surreal emotion-driven supernatural narrative in the vein of The Others and The Lovely BonesJessica’s Window is a suspenseful, masterfully-written drama. The script manages to land an array of emotional punches, each one landing harder than the first. All of which culminates in a surprise final twist that will leave audiences speechless.

Audiences and critics will be hooked from the get-go. It’s exactly the kind of impassioned, poignant, character-driven drama that reaps gold on the festival circuit.

So directors – act fast. This one won’t be gathering dust in the attic for long.

Pages: 5

Budget: Medium. Suburban setting, police cars, and a news crew.

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple something, something Danger Zone. He is currently working on that screenplay everybody keeps talking about: The Wild Age. Contact him at dane.whipple (AT) live.com

About the writer, Marnie Mitchell Lister: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at brainfluffs.com. Marnie’s had multiple shorts produced and placed Semi-final with her features in BlueCat.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Someplace Nice and Dark – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Someplace Nice and Dark

A young delivery boy calls on a strange old man harboring a shadowy secret.

Finding a good horror short with something fresh to say can be difficult, to say the least.  Everyone’s seen the proliferation of vampire, slasher, exorcism and zombie scripts ad nauseum.  Is there anything left in this field to explore?

Well, here’s a short that does have something new, creepy and gothic.  Set in a trailer, “Someplace Nice and Dark” revolves around only two characters – Pinto, the urban delivery boy… and a old man who seems to have a strange aversion to the light.  (No, kiddies, this isn’t what you’re thinking.)  Done with the right actors and atmosphere, this is one script that could win some lucky director a horror festival.

About the writer:  Robert Newcomer recently received his first IMDB credit for another short, Them That’s Dead.  An intelligent writer, he has several other shorts and a horror feature length available for consideration. (IMDB credits listed here.)

Budget: Low

Primary Genre: Horror

Page Length: 9 pages

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Friends for Life – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Friends for Life

A family’s move to a new neighborhood brings change they weren’t looking for.

Moving to a new neighborhood. It’s always so difficult… especially for a child. Forget the moving boxes, change of address, and the millions of mundane chores. It’s upending one’s social life that hurts the worst. A new school. Having to make all new friends. The result can be a nightmare. In more ways than one…

Fortunately for eight year old Jake, the new neighborhood comes with certain perks. His dad, Frank, built him a new treehouse. And then there’s Rob next door. An adventurous eight year old as well – Jake’s new best bud; a “ginger” with flaming red hair. Sure, the move’ll require adjusting. But Jake’s young. He’s got all the time in the world!

Despite it all, Jake’s mother Susan worries. And calls in professional help: Dr. Young – child psychologist. As Friends opens, Jake and Rob play outside. Dr. Young and Susan pour over Jake’s drawings at the kitchen table – discussing far more “adult” things. Everything’s under control. Or is it?

Forget splashy FX and gore. The hallmark of great horror is simplicity. The ability to take an innocent situation. And turn it – CRACK – on it’s head. Friends for Life is a textbook case of how to do that right. Horror directors take note. If you’re looking for a stylish, simple script… Friends for Life is chilling. And perfect.

About the writer: Paul J. Williams is a New Jersey-based multi-award-winning screenwriter, producer, and director with several scripts in various stages of film production. He has been a member of the New Jersey Screenwriter’s Group since 2009. His latest movie, “Case #5930”, which he wrote and produced, will be released in 2015.

He has also served as a decorated law enforcement officer for the past eighteen years, both as a Federal Officer with the U.S. Department of Justice and as a Police Officer for the City of Newark, N.J.

He can be reached at pauljwilliams9 “AT” yahoo. His IMDB page is available here: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm5465926/

Pages: 5

Budget: Very low. A handful of actors. A suburban setting with a treehouse.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Monday, June 27, 2016

Psycho-Therapist – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Psycho-Therapist

A therapist has an unorthodox method for curing his suicidal patients… he tries to murder them!

Slasher films. You either love ‘em or hate ‘em. Usually penned from the “shallow end of the pool”, most slashers feature one dimensional characters interesting for only one detail – how they meet their grisly end. (Okay, sometimes there are boobies too. But that’s just an added guy-bonus.) As for the bad guys? They’re also pretty tightly defined. Jason wears a hockey mask. Freddy has Wolverine gloves, and Michael Meyers is channeling William Shatner.

After awhile, it seems like it’s all been done. How can a script differentiate itself? Especially after Saw and the Human Centipede?

Well, there’s always Psycho-Therapist – a script that brings a new meaning to “Shock Therapy.” Written in classic “cabin in the woods” style, PT follows a group of suicidal teens that have been sent to camp to deal with their issues once and for all. When they arrive, it quickly becomes apparent that their shrink – Dr. Jeffries – isn’t exactly by the book. For instance, he wheels in the corpse of a dead teen that killed himself with a shotgun… just to give his patients a reality check (not to mention some nasty smells.) But when one of the kids gets butchered in the night, it looks like the Doc has gone too far. The rest of the group run for their lives. With their Psycho-Therapist close behind…

Despite the 23 page length, this script reads fast. Lots of blood and death for the gorehounds out there – complete with a classic horror twist. Give Psycho-Therapist a read. It could be just what the doctor ordered….

 About the writer: Gary started out writing comedy sketches and has had several of them produced. He recently sold his short script ‘Death of an Icon’ to an Emmy nominated director. He has also penned several features and is currently putting the finishing touches to a high-concept zombie comedy that promises to bring something new to the genre. Aside from writing, his biggest passion is the English soccer team Everton F.C. He can be contacted at: gazrow – AT – hotmail.

Pages: 23

Budget: Not that bad. The setting’s basically one lodge, a van, and some external shots. You would need to set aside some money for effects. Especially the intro scene.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Search with Google

    Custom Search SimplyScripts

One Week Challenge

SimplyScripts Newsletter

    Subscribe to the SimplyScripts mailing list

    * indicates required


    Help Forever Red get made! Got no coin? Don't sweat it, comrade. You can still help by following the campaign on Seed and Spark!

Featured SimplyScripts Blogs

ScriptSearch

Advertisement

More Navigation

Great Vocab

Latest Entries

Categories

Script of the Day
October 19, 2017

Advertisement

Donate


Advertisement



Writers I dig

Search Amazon

Search Sheet Music




SimplyScripts Logo