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Monday, September 18, 2017

Boyarski Dance – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Julia Cottle

Boyarski Dance by D.W. Smith

Akar’s been abducted just hours before his wedding. Will he make it to the temple on time?

Wedding days can be stressful; dealing with millions of crucial, pesky details. The last thing one needs is to be abducted – only hours before you take your vows.

Yet that’s exactly the predicament Akar, the protagonist of D.W. Smith’s Boyarski Dance, unfortunately finds himself in.

For the life of him, Akar can’t comprehend what’s tossed him in such dire straits – hooded and tied to a chair. His captors demand he confess. But Akar has no clue what they’re talking about. How could an innocent such as him cause anyone to be upset?

The terrified groom-to-be pleads with the two anonymous men looming over him – dressed in black jumpsuits and goggles. But his kidnappers won’t divulge any information. They’re too busy bickering amongst themselves:

            SHTARKER 1
How do you know you didn’t do it if
you keep saying you don’t know what
it is that you did when it was did.

            SHTARKER 2
Done.

            SHTARKER 1
Done what?

            SHTARKER 2
What he done.

            SHTARKER 1
That’s what I asked.

            SHTARKER 2
No you didn’t. You said “When it
was did.”

            SHTARKER 1
You grading on a curve?

            SHTARKER 2
You’d still fail.

            SHTARKER 1
Fail dees.

            SHTARKER 2
Who’s Dees?

            SHTARKER 1
Dees NUTS!
     (Shtarker 1 grabs his crotch.)

            SHTARKER 2
Real adult, ya putz.

   Shtarker 2 smacks Shtarker 1 on the back of the head.

It’s a Three Stooges schtick, personified.

As his torment drags on, Akar increasingly despairs. His tormentors accuse him of snitching – about what? So, Akar continues to plead for mercy… Especially after they whip the torture implements out, and wave them in his horrified face.

Leaving one essential question: is Akar a lowly snitch? Or the mensch he claims to be? This day was supposed to be the happiest of Akar’s life. Now will it be… the last?

Audiences won’t believe how this story unfolds. You’ll be laughing so hard, you’ll plotz.

Budget: Low. Three actors (with great comedic timing) and a “sinister” looking room – that’s it!

About the writer: D.W. Smith life’s goal was to leave something for his granddaughter to read after he was gone. During his 2010 tour in Iraq, while he was in a bunker under attack, that he started to write. Luckily he made it out alive, retired from the Military and has now published two books – Asim: Servant of Two Masters and Refuge. He is currently working on a full feature script along with other short scripts. He can be contacted at DannyNIraq (a) hotmail.

Read Boyarski Dance (8 pages in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has begun work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321 (a) Gmail.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

The Creation of Oz – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Guest Reviewer

The Creation of Oz (6 pages in PDF format) by Marnie Mitchell

Sometimes, the most beautiful dreams emerge from the most modest beginnings…

Where do wizards come from?

And not just wizards. Thoughts. Ideas. Stories. Do they all sprout from random events? An odd sparking of the synapses – with no true rhyme or reason? Or it there always an ah-hah origin – no matter how small or unexpected – from which our grandest tales and myths grow?

In the Creation of Oz, talented writer Marnie Mitchellweaves an imaginary tale of the origins of “The Wizard of Oz.” While it may not be rooted in historical fact, The Creation of Oz taps into the colorful fantasy of this beloved film… capturing the spirit and magic at its heart – if not the true reality.

The opening description: a farm located in South Dakota – smack dab in tornado alley. As a twister approaches, young Frank Baum (10) is herded into an underground shelter, along with the rest of his family. Aunt Emogene. Uncle Luke. Crotchedy neighbor Mrs. Krause. And three year old Dorothy.

Shivering in the shadow of the twister, the family wait out the storm. It is here in the dim light of an oil lamp that young Frank – a natural storyteller – passes the time. Distracting his family with an impromptu tall tale… of a little girl, and her tumultuous journey to find her way home from a strange and magical land. It’s a story we’ve all heard before. But even the most time-worn tale has it’s beginning somewhere.

Filled with tons of Easter Eggs for Wizard of Oz fans, The Creation of Oz is a charming script with great characters – not to mention a built-in fan base! If your tastes run towards the whimsical, grab this script while you can. Before it’s gone… over the rainbow.

Budget: Eminently producible. One setting (the shelter), and seven characters.

About the writer: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell-Lister’s website is BrainFluffs.com. Marnie has had 5 shorts produced (so far) and placed Semi-final with her features in Bluecat.

Read The Creation of Oz (6 pages in PDF format)

About the reviewer: Michael O’Farrell is a mathematician who worked on the Space Shuttle Program and now writes fiction.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Close To Sunset by Steven Clark – Short Script Review – In Production - posted by Steve Miles

Close to Sunset (16 pages in pdf format) Steven Clark In Production

After the death of his mother, a middle-aged man learns the horrifying truth about the childhood disappearance of his brother.

Production Stills

Script Review

Home movie footage has a way of evoking emotion. A grainy, colour faded moment captured in time. This is how Beyond Sunset starts: young brothers, Jack and Sam, fool for the camera. A fleeting memory of lost childhood.

Shadows grow over a public playground. A car prowls along an adjacent road. The boys play, each lost in a world of blissful innocence. Moments later Jack looks up to find his brother gone. He squints into the setting sun, just in time to catch Sam wave goodbye before he slips into the car and vanishes forever.

Jump forward several decades. Jack, now in his 50s and with a family of his own. It’s been a rough week for Jack. Mom’s dead. Her estate needs to be settled which leaves Jack and younger sister, Trisha, to clear the old family home for sale.

It’s a task fraught with emotion. The sting of memory carried with every trinket and family photograph. There’s that yellow dress of Mom’s or the grave of Houdini, beloved house-cat who was never fully tamed. 

As Jack delves deeper into the shadows of Mom’s life secrets begin to reveal themselves. Old wounds are opened and tensions rise, until finally Jack stumbles upon the darkest recess of them all…

Steven Clark’s haunting thriller Beyond Sunset lights a fuse that burns its way to the very end. It’s a tense, brooding mystery, delivered with a subtlety that begs to be picked up.  Any filmmaker looking for a low budget nuanced thriller would be remiss not to check this script out immediately.

About the writer: Based in upstate, NY, Steven Clark is the writer of over 30 short scripts, several of which are under option, in pre-production, or have already been made into films. On A Clear Night, a family Christmas feature aimed at a Hallmark Channel-type audience, is currently in the works. Steven can be reached at Steamroller138 (a) gmail.

About the reviewer: Steve Miles started writing scripts around five years ago after realizing that his social life was vastly overrated. He enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit – from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums. Check out more of his work at sjmilesscripts.webs.com

Read Close to Sunset (pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, September 8, 2017

$1.50 A Scoop – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Julia Cottle

$1.50 A Scoop by Khamanna Iskandarova

A boy just wanted some ice cream. Little did he know everything that came with the $1.50 scoop…

Audiences always love a riveting story about two very different people; from opposite ends of the tracks. Ones whose lives come crashing into each other like a runaway train. Especially when one is so good. And the other… so very, very bad.

Even more exciting is what happens next: when the “nice” get ensnared in “naughty” schemes.

Think Oliver and the Artful Dodger, for one. Other classics work as well: Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. And then there’s Les Miz – Javert and Jean ValjeanCosette and Eponine.

In every instance, the conflicting enticement’s the same. We just can’t wait to see if good prevails, or evil triumphs above all. Do the characters eventually switch roles? Or will everyone just brush the dust off their lapels, and climb unsteadily to their feet?

After all, the Artful Dodger and Fagin dance off in just that manner – continuing on the same path they’ve tread every day. But folks, character arcs should never be predictable… no matter what STC might say.

And that’s the excitement Khamanna Iskandarova dishes up in $1.50 a Scoop, a little drama as sweet as pure ice cream.

In Scoop, Greg and Mike couldn’t be more different. Mike’s only twelve years old – sweet, considerate… and mute. Greg is eighteen – tougher than steel, and a thief. But they do have one thing in common. Both boys looooove their ice cream.

Their paths cross as Mike is counting out coins he’s collected to see if he can afford $1.50 for a single scoop. Greg’s got considerably more moolah – so he buys his cone, and tosses Mike the change. A grateful Mike seizes the moment, and selects the flavor he’s been eying all this time.

But right as Mike’s about to enjoy a much-awaited treat, he sees Greg steal from an elderly woman. Souring the taste of the ice cream Greg’s paid for – before it reaches poor Mike’s mouth.

Being the good kid he is, Mike just wants to do the right thing.

But the tables swiftly turn – leaving Mike accused of the very crime that “belongs” to Greg. Ironically, Greg’s the only one who can save him. But will a hardened thief ever change his ways? Will Mike ever enjoy ice cream again?

A sweet little drama that’ll be a breeze to film (and a favorite of festivals everywhere), $1.50 a Scoop takes little Mike on a journey he’ll never forget. Nor will your audience. We guarantee.

Budget: Low.

About the writer: Khamanna Iskandarova is a dedicated mother and wife. She was born and raised in Azerbaijan, a small country at the shores of the Caspian Sea, but she has been living in the US for the most part of her life. Khamanna holds a BA in Foreign Languages and an MBA from the University of Houston, both of which she graduated with high honors. Khamanna never dreamed of Hollywood, however, she writes on a daily basis. She has several features completed, as well as a dozen shorts. Several of her shorts were produced by independent productions. She attempts to shoot movies herself now and then and has a total of three short films under her belt, but says she doesn’t enjoy it half as much as writing. Khamanna can be reached at khamanna “AT” hotmail. Check out her IMDB Creds.

Read $1.50 A Scoop (5 pages in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has begun work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321 (a) gmail.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

QC Challenge Results - posted by James Barron

The QC Challenge results are in!

Writers faced a grueling, time-sensitive challenge and came through in spades. These scripts are light on page count and locale, but heavy on drama. No surprise that one short has already been snatched up for production. Don’t miss out on the rest!

 

Top voted script:

Cyborn by Mark Renshaw

A hunted, dying android crawls beneath the broken alter of a gutted Church. His name is Braxx. To the enraged Luddite mob outside, he has no name. He is a thing. An abomination of metal and wires they’ll soon rip apart the moment they’ve cleared the barricades.

Braxx’s sole comfort in his darkest hour – a set of dice. A very special set designed to trigger memories, each roll eliciting panoptic bursts of random past experience.

So, as the hordes close in, Braxx rolls. And remembers. And spends his last moments in the most human way possible – clinging to every moment before that, to life, through the wonderful vagaries of chance.

***Script currently in contest consideration. Only available upon request. Mark Renshaw can be reached through his website at http://www.mark-renshaw.com. An award-winning producer and director, his last project earned ‘Best Sci-Fi’ at the Top Shorts and Festigious film festivals.

 

Other top picks:

Ice Cream Soda pdf format by Steven Clark

Death is an everyday presence in nursing homes. But after a well-liked patient’s expiration, Nurse Helen begins to sense a more immediate, tangible force. Something sinister in origin, lurking like vapors from a faulty gas valve. It’s so near, this presence, she can hear it. A tap tapping coming from down the hall. Drawn to it, to the strange sight of a little girl at the end of the hall. A little girl singing a haunting nursery rhyme that chills Helen to the core.

Read the full script here. Based in upstate, NY, Steven Clark is the writer of over 30 short scripts, several of which are under option, in pre-production, or have already been made into films. He can be reached at Steamroller138 “AT” gmail and his work can be found on his new website.

 

Eeny Meeny pdf format by Dustin Bowcott

For octogenarian Imani, time has not healed the wounds of racial bigotry suffered growing up in an all-white 1950’s neighborhood. Nor has it helped reconcile her single, horrible act of retaliation. Time has only sharpened dueling emotions of guilt and indignation down to a fine, cutting shame. Haunted by images of her past, trapped in a maelstrom of self-loathing, Imani will make one last desperate attempt to break the cycle of remembrance.

Read the full script here. Dustin Bowcott is a BBC Writer’s Room and Shore Scripts finalist. He is a produced and optioned writer, and has recently turned his hand to production. You can reach him at dustin7375 “AT” gmail.

 

Skip pdf format by Gary Howell

Caring for a loved one with dementia is a special challenge. Anna’s learned to steel herself to the blank stares and tepid responses that dominate her mother’s once ebullient charm. But on this particular visit, Anna’s brought along her granddaughter. And for one fleeting moment something truly magical is about to happen. Something that will briefly unite four generations in shared harmony.

Read the full script here. Gary is an attorney and accomplished author who can be reached at garymhowell “AT” gmail.

 

Sunset View pdf format by Pia Cook

Senior citizens Todd and Martin have vastly different views on their twilight years. Todd sees opportunity, an aura of significance to each day with a multiplicity of joys yet to be discovered. For Martin, it’s an inevitable march to the grave blighted by lonely nights and illness. Determined to change his friend’s outlook, Todd arranges the perfect date with a vivacious female resident. But will it be enough?

Read the full script here. Born and raised in Sweden, Pia Cook has four produced features, a fifth one in pre-production, and twenty five shorts to her name. Check out her IMDB creds. She started writing screenplays in 2006 and has written seventy short screenplays and ten features. She can be reached at gatortales “AT” gmail.

 

On a Pair of Dice pdf format by Dena McKinnon

Love your neighbor. Feed the hungry. Comfort the sorrowful. These are some of the most basic Christian principles. Notions that will be put to the test when a mysterious beggar stumbles into a prosperous Church during tidy Sunday worship. And the item he places in the offering plate just might send shock waves through the entire community.

Read the full script here. Dena McKinnon is a talented writer with a number of produced shorts under her belt. Check out Dena’s IMDB credits and website at DenaMcKinnon.com/.

 

Congrats to Warren Duncan, who’s script Numbers of the Beast was optioned before the contest even finished. You can find more of his work here. Last but not least, be sure to check out all the other QC Challenge scripts for more great stories!

These screenplays may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer and runner of the Quickie Challenge: James Barron is a former law student turned screenwriter who loves to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller. Check out his work at JBarronScripts.com

Monday, September 4, 2017

The Companion Shop – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Julia Cottle

The Companion Shop by John Hunter

A real deal carries a heavy price when an elderly woman seeks true companionship.

Robots are here. They can clean your house, drive your car, and make your coffee in the morning. They can even become your new best friend – that is, depending on one’s tastes…

In John Hunter’s latest hit The Companion Shop, Mildred – an old woman – seeks to find a robot that will serve as… well… a companion. A store located in the middle of the classy commercial area offers just that – and maybe more.

Mildred wanders into the shop, clutching a coupon that promises a huge discount on the Companion of her choice. Satisfaction guaranteed. Salesman Anthony seems eager to show her the merchandise, especially after a Harry Gentleman model catches Mildred’s eye.

The Harry model proves more expensive than Mildred expected – still, she bonds with it instantly. Determined to clinch the sale, Anthony assures her she can always bring Harry back for a full refund if it doesn’t work out, no questions asked. How you can put a price on companionship? Mildred mulls that over. How indeed?

But once at home with Harry, Mildred’s life takes an unexpected turn…

Are you a director that loved Lars and the Real Girl? Then give The Companion Shop a whirl; it’s another great story about the desire for true companionship – in any shape or form!

Budget: Low. Creating the scene for the shop could incur some expenses  – depending on how elaborate you want the FX!

About the writer, John Hunter: With the completion of (4) boffo features, a litter of riveting shorts, a one hour take-your-breath-away sci-fi TV pilot and first 30-minute episode for that series, I am now officially THAT guy — The one who really needs an Agent or Executive Producer. Contact me at x32792 (AT) yahoo.com.

Read The Companion Shop (9 pages in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing. She may be reached at: Cottle54321 (a) gmail.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

In Between – Short Script (Available for Production) - posted by Julia Cottle

In Between by Nolan Bryand

No one said that (after) life would be easy…

Many people live their lives thinking that someday there will be a reckoning; a time to account for everything ever said or done. If you’ve been good, you get to go to where the good people go and if you’ve been bad, you can go to hell. Unless you are among a very select fictional few —like Jane Bingum from Drop Dead Diva—you don’t get another chance.

In Noland Bryand’s latest work, In Between, afterlife determinations turn out to be much more complex. Omni Potent has been tasked with the difficult job of finding a place for this assortment of souls. His waiting room often looks like a gathering at the Mos Eisley Cantina in Star Wars: Wickenites, beings from Black Eye Galaxy and the planets Cog, Klaken and Klax. Having to meet with so many clients who speak so many different languages and carry such long resumes sure makes staffing complicated: it would be so much easier if Jesus hadn’t hacked the system and if people could just die and then go to heaven…or hell.

Dead golfer Wilfred makes Omni’s job that much worse.

     Wilfred closes the door behind him.

     OMNI POTENT, a ball of majestic light, hovers over a large,sturdy desk.

     A large screen on the wall behind the desk.

            OMNI POTENT
Take a seat.

     A chair slides up behind Wilfred. He sits down.

Finding a D class job for this man who completely messed things up on his last assignment is going to be a real drag. There is no way that Omni’ll be able to place him somewhere on Earth, despite Wilfred’s whining that special favor is in order for guys like him.

In Between combines the best of dramatic storytelling with its crazily creative construction of an alternate universe, with beings submerged in out-of-this-world circumstances. You won’t want to miss the chance to bring this one to life!

Budget: Moderate. Some minor special effect work needed, such as hovering blobs of light…

About the writer Nolan Bryand: Having studied film as a minor in university, I took a particular interest in screenwriting.  The thought of creating something from scratch was fascinating.  I abandoned writing after graduating, and only within the last three years have I come back to it.  Since that time, I’ve optioned three short scripts, one of which has been completed.  The thrill of seeing my work come to life was amazing, and extremely satisfying!  I’m currently working on a few feature length scripts. Nolan can be reached at: nolanbryand1 (a) gmail.

Read In Between (11 pages in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has begun work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321 (a) gmail.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

San Diego Impala Cholas – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Julia Cottle

San Diego Impala Cholas by C. J. Wally

All they wanted to do was sell a gun. But things don’t always go as planned.

The great thing about revenge stories is that they mess with what we like to think about right and wrong. Do the ends justify the means? And, when it’s a woman taking justice into her own hands, even murderers gain our sympathies. From Lipstick to the likes of Volver, The Brave One, Kill Bill, and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, we love stories where strong women match evil with evil…especially when justice prevails.

Meet Babyface, Prima and Whisper: three low-riding, gun-toting, social critic gangsters.   CJ Walley’s San Diego Impala Cholas opens with the three in their Impala, driving to meet a woman who needs a gun. When the gangsters encounter their prospective buyer Lola, they are filled with scorn that quickly turns to mistrust. But Lola has a secret. And, once the Cholas discover the truth, they devise a plan of their own.

What coulda, shoulda been a simple transaction with a gun gets complicated – quickly. Compassion, politics and a shared anger over the injustices women face jumps directly in the way.

Thanks to C.J. Walley’s unique style, the dialogue for Cholas really pops, filled with slang from gangster culture and exchanges that his female characters feel alive. These women – as depicted – are for real and scorn those who don’t walk the talk. As Prima explicitly declares: “Personas dressin’ up like gangsters and, you know, gettin’ ink, because, what? They like the style?”

Fans of C.J. Walley won’t be surprised – Cholas’ chalk full of captivating dialogue… as well as a masterful exploration into what motivates his characters. Including violent, gritty action. Make room Lisbeth Salander and Beatrix Kiddo, here come the Cholas! Everyone make room for the ride!

Budget: Low to medium – will need a Chevy Impala.

About the writer –  CJ Walley: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producer in LA on a comedy series, working with a director in New Orleans on a thriller, and blogging for Stage 32. I’m here to do two things, work hard and make friends. My writing has a down and dirty tone, deep emotion, gritty action, wry humor, and features strong female leads. If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line.

Read San Diego Impala Cholas (11 pages in PDF format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She recently has begun to work on two screenplays.

Monday, August 28, 2017

The Riding Hoods’ Creed – Short Script Review – Optioned - posted by Julia Cottle

The Riding Hoods’ Creed by P. H. Cook

Lonnie was just supposed to take her back to Grandma’s House. But, something overcame him along the way.

Fairy-tales: don’t you just love them to Death? Especially the original work by The Brothers Grimm. Now there’s a compendium of bloody, gruesome, sexual stuff: the ultimate Fantasy Nightmare. And when fairy tales get blended with other cultural icons – in an organic, gritty manner…? Then screw Jason and Michael Meyers. The result here’s more… magical, to say the least!

Take the story of Little Red Riding Hood, for instance. “Little Red” just wants to make it safely to Grandma’s house. While she wanders through the forest, a wolf stealthily plots her demise. Big eyes, big teeth, big appetite. Then along comes The Hunter, and everyone lives happily ever after…except for the wolf, that is.

Pia Cook’s latest work, The Riding Hoods’ Creed, teases the audience with twists it takes along this well loved (and travelled) story line. Which makes perfect sense when you think it over. A winding path through the woods? Who could ever take the straight-away?

In this version of the age-old fairy tale, teenage Gwen wanders off from Grandma’s trailer park into a bar. The patrons of this grungy dive? A dreaded biker gang, The Riding Hoods. Dressed in a short black leather skirt and “an even shorter and tighter red top”, Gwen is out for adventure. Yet, despite their grizzled appearance, the men in the bar worry that this young woman spells trouble. Not for herself… for them. About to launch a regular tradition, the bikers need Gwen gone. ASAP.

Gang member Lonnie is quickly appointed to make sure the young woman gets pushed out the door, and escorted home to Grandma safe. Gwen protests, but Harry ominously warns:


Trust me, tonight ain’t the night
little girls wanna be out walking
by themselves.
     (to Lonnie)
No time to fuck around, Lonnie.
Take her home to grandma,
then get back here before eleven.

The two take off on Lonnie’s motorcycle (aka “metal steed”). Lon picks a shortcut through the woods, designed to get him home in time to join his men.

That’s doing the right thing, isn’t it? But in the woods, things always lose control. To the extent that Lonnie (and Gwen’s) in a mess of trouble. ‘Cause even biker gangs have strict rules. And Lonnie’s broken Rule Number One.

Why was the gang so eager to get a luscious piece like Gwen out of the way? And, what exactly is Rule Number One? Don’t miss the chance to find out. Make sure you have really big eyes and a huge appetite – because you’re in for a delicious surprise!

Budget: Moderate. Will need a motorcycle, a bar scene, a wooded area, and a short black leather skirt. Okay – in other words, this is one shoot that’ll be real fun! And the classic 50s rock and role soundtrack for this could be… amazing, don’t you think?

About the writer: Born and raised in Sweden, Pia Cook has four produced features, a fifth one in pre-production, and twenty five shorts to her name. Check out her IMDB creds. She started writing screenplays in 2006 and has written seventy short screenplays and ten features. She can be reached at gatortales “AT” gmail!

Read The Riding Hoods’ Creed (11 pages in pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production.

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She has always loved to write, but only recently has begun to work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321 (a) gmail.

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