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Friday, February 5, 2016

The Unlikely Temptation of Christ – Trailer - posted by Don

The Unlikely Temptations of Christ by (7 pages, pdf format) Mark Moore (irish eyes)

After fasting for forty days and forty nights, Jesus is tempted by the devil, in the most unusual ways. (short, comedy)

Coming to a film festival near you!

Discuss this script on the Discussion Board

The Buyer – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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The Buyer

When it comes to empty houses, sometimes buyers should beware.

As Rod Serling used to say each week, “You unlock this door with the key of imagination.” And so it is with the best of scripts. Before you begin reading this one, take a moment, close your eyes, and imagine the theme music from The Twilight Zone. Then (after a short commercial break) start reading, because this story is definitely Serling-esque. In the best possible way.

It all begins in a picture-perfect living room, with dust gently drifting through rays of sunshine. Two women – one a realtor, the other a prospective buyer – move slowly through the space. There’s subtle tension in the air…

…and an eerie dynamic lurking just outside our awareness, involving the two women and the house. Stay alert to pick up details. Why does the cell phone signal fail at certain times? Whose overturned picture lies on the shelf? Most importantly, who (or what) is the mysterious woman seen briefly in the hallways?

Could it be a ghost? We’ll never tell. But we will paint a picture for you. Imagine The Others meets The Uninvited. Weaved together with poetic skill.

If you’re in search of a low-budget spine tingler with a humdinger of a twist, this script could be what you’re looking for. One location – an empty house. All interior. No special effects. And meaty roles for three 30-something actresses. What more could a director ask for?

About the writer: I’ve been writing for about four years now. I always loved it but managed to get constantly side-tracked by silly things like: finding a real job, getting married, having kids, a mortgage… I finally decided to stop making excuses (not completely) and write “for real”. I made it to the quarter-finals of the Nicholls Fellowship last year, the semi-finals of the Screencraft Fellowship earlier this year, and am currently in the finals of the Industry Insider competition featuring Sheldon Turner. I’m still pretty wet behind the ears, but for the first time in a long time, I actually refer to myself as a writer. I can always be reached at kostak “AT” kostak.com

Pages: 7

Budget: Very affordable. One house, three actresses – and you’re set.

About the reviewer: Scott Merrow co-writes screenplays with his wife Paula. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy… the whole nine yards.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Thicker Than Water – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Thicker Than Water

“A successful drug dealer gets the shock of her life when her estranged younger sister shows up.”

Anyone who’s got a sister or brother knows it’s a given — an unwritten rule that you love them. Or at least you like them. A little bit. That’s how it’s supposed to be anyway… Interactions with siblings can be complicated. More likely than not, your mutual feelings probably run the gamut on a daily basis – somewhere between undying love and hate. (Don’t worry… we won’t tell your sister.)

But in MJ Hermanny’s award-winning drama Thicker Than Water, there’s more at stake than a few conflicted feelings.

It’s after midnight when the buzzer sounds at Trina’s plush London penthouse, and she’s stunned to hear Cassie’s voice, her younger sister. Trina hesitates at first; she and Cassie have been estranged for six years. Besides, Trina’s busy… counting the money from her drug business. But she hides the loot and lets Cassie in.

You can cut the tension with a knife as the two struggle to find common ground. Trina’s fancy surroundings are no longer a lure for Cassie. She’s been there, done that – and gotten out. And she wants the same for Trina. Well, actually, she demands it. Using her Metropolitan Police badge as leverage.

Trina challenges Cassie, “You wouldn’t bust your own sister!” The unwritten rule hangs thick in the air. Sisters are supposed to have each other’s back. Aren’t they?

Will Cassie succeed in changing Trina’s path? Or are these sisters heading for a showdown that makes sibling rivalry look like child’s play?

Similar to movies like August: Osage County, Rachel Getting Married and In Her Shoes, the relationship in TTW is intensely relatable. Simple to film, TTW delivers a compelling story with two strong female characters. So grab this one now — it won’t last long!

About the writer: Boasting an MA in Scriptwriting for Film, Theatre, TV & Radio, MJ is an award winning writer, with shorts optioned and produced in countries as diverse as Croatia and Norway. Residing in sunny England, she is currently hard at work developing a series with the BBC Writersroom – as well as working on a number of features (including one low-budget horror and a fantasy adventure script.) Her website is available here: redcatwriter.wordpress.com/. MJ herself can be reached via mjhermanny – AT – gmail!

Pages: 4

Budget: Low. Only two characters and one room. This story’s an easy shoot – with an up close and personal feel.

About the reviewer for “Thicker Than Water”: California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Writer’s Block – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Writer’s Block
Billy Wilson would kill for a good story. Will he die for one?

Words, words, words! For writers, words are life. On a good day, words flow onto the page to create stories that move and inspire us. A well-written story can uplift and…um…hang on, I swear I had something for this. Dang, writing is tough.

Billy Wilson knows all too well the struggle with the blank page. Sitting on a park bench looking for inspiration in a bottle of booze, Billy has a serious case of writer’s block. As Billy ponders just how to come up with a truly unique story, along comes a proverbial spider: Vance Buttons. You see, Vance has a secret to share. He is a serial killer. A well-practiced, calculating, pre-meditated murderer. With half-drunk whimsy, Billy queries for a few specifics. How to choose a victim? Randomly. Geographic preference? Never the same place twice. Just when it seems Billy has found something new to write about, one more problem crops up. He is dealing with a killer after all. Will Vance put Billy out of the misery that is writer’s block, or put him out of his misery altogether? Is Billy writing the story, or is the story writing him?

Feature films dealing with the writing experience pack a potent, powerful punch. Some of film’s truly great screenwriters, from Charlie Kaufman to the Coens, have tackled the subject. AdaptationBarton Fink, and Wonder Boys have all built reputations as favorites among both filmmakers and audiences. In this grand tradition, Writer’s Block succinctly taps into a subject that consistently garners accolades on the festival circuit and beyond. If you are looking for a film with an intelligent build to an unforgettable finale, I recommend you come down with a case of Writer’s Block.

Quickly, before the killer strikes again!

Pages: 4

Budget: Low. Assuming you can find a park bench, that is.

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple is the man who fixed the 1919 World Series. How did he manage that? Saw the opportunity, I suppose. He is currently working on that screenplay everybody keeps talking about: The Wild Age. Contact him at dane.whipple (AT) live.com

About the writer: In a recent interview with Fab-And-Glam Writer’s Quarterly (a completely fictitious publication), John Hunter, a self-taught and aspiring writer advises other new writers to avoid is, are, ing, ly, (wrylies) and beats – both regular and small. “Try to write tight (be economical with words, not drunk). Write tight, but not too tight — ‘Pulls out a pad and pencil’ is not the same as ‘Pulls out a small pad and a stubby pencil.’ One adds some colorful and interesting details about the character (Double entendre? Perhaps?).”

In addition to this and other shorts, John Hunter has (3) completed feature scripts available for production (two cop-buddy and one Western with a strong female lead). His email address is x32792 (AT) yahoo.com.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Christmas Spirit – Short Script (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Christmas Spirit
Drugs, guns, armed robbery…Tim’s in a lot of trouble. Can Santa save him?

Just because a person uses drugs, doesn’t always mean they want to; users often wish that they could quit. But, envisioning a life without drugs, imagining a future different than their present reality, frequently seems impossible. The sadness that fills their lives, the trauma with which they are dealing, makes change elusive. Sometimes another person’s support can make all the difference in the world.

Other times, a stranger’s concern is plain irritating—especially if it’s accompanied by unreciprocated holiday cheer. Richard F. Russell’s latest work, Christmas Spirit, dishes up just this type of encounter; recalcitrant druggie meets unwavering do-gooder. The results are anything but predictable.

Tim seeks escape—from his parent’s divorce, his girlfriend’s fleeing, his mother’s imminent betrothal to an internet hookup with a Russian man seeking a U.S. visa, and his dad’s heroin habit sustained while sexually exploiting children halfway across the globe—with expensive white powder. Very expensive for Tim. So expensive that now he sits in his car outside a filling station with a gun, getting ready to procure the money he needs for more lines… the night before Christmas…with Dickens’ A Christmas Carol playing on his car radio.

Like his namesake in Dicken’s novel, Tim is sick. And, he’s not exactly full of Christmas spirit. So, when Santa pulls up in a minivan and proceeds to engage him in a conversation about his future, Tim becomes enraged. Who is this Santa dude anyway? Rather than listen to the red-suited bearded man’s drivel, Tim feels more inclined to use his gun to shoot Santa instead.

TIM
SHUT UP OR BY GOD, I’LL SHUT IT.

SANTA
And your father is somewhere in Thailand having sex with young boys and shooting heroin.

Tim steps close and sticks his pistol in Santa’s belly.

TIM
Want to die, fuck off? Want that?

Spoiler alert: Santa doesn’t want to die.

Russell engagingly brings together Dickens’ Christmas tales together with U.S. holiday kitsch, societal ills, as well as the protagonist Tim’s past, present and future. If you love holiday stories that are about so much more than season’s greetings, don’t miss the chance to read – and produce – Christmas Spirit… before the holidays arrive.

Pages: 6

Budget: Low to Moderate. The scene includes a Santa prop with lighting.

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has begun work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: Richard Russell lives in North Carolina where he plays golf and writes. He has been writing since college when his short stories appeared in the university literary magazine. He loves writing screenplays, and THE CALL, written with his partner, Felice Bassuk, is one of their best. They have written an award-winning feature, THE KOI KEEPER, which they hope to see on the screen in the not too distant future. Richard has a trove of shorts and feature length screenplays and continues to add to the inventory. Writing remains the sole source of sanity in Richard’s chaotic world.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, February 1, 2016

Dead Zingers – Script Review (Available for Production) – AND THERE’S MORE! - posted by wonkavite

Dead Zingers
After a brush with death, a woman gets another chance. Or two.

We all have been in these situations before.

Say you’ve just met the person of your dreams, and your first words were less than intelligible. Or worse, maybe you could only manage a grunt or an embarrassing bodily noise. Needless to say, you would give anything to have that moment over again so you could make it as perfect as you imagined it.

Unfortunately, life doesn’t always allow us a second chance. Luckily, movies do.

In the comedy Dead Zingers, life not only gives you a second chance, it offers you a menu of alternative outcomes.

Morag is a church organist who narrowly escapes being struck by Aamir a texting motorist. As she stands paralyzed on the curb, Morag struggles to find just the right words for the hazardous driver. Two words immediately come to mind – but that’s just me.

What follows is a humorous mixture of Morag’s imagination, combined with an alternate universe gone haywire, and a smidge of Groundhog’s Day to boot. Morag relives the near accident again and again with increasingly hilarious results until the universe decides on a final outcome which suits Morag, Aamir, and a mysterious bearded man.

Writer KT Parker delivers a script which blends comedy, fantasy, and reckless driving. Not to mention a dance number straight outta Bollywood. No small feat.

Attention all filmmakers and directors — here is your opportunity to snag a quirky comedy, so don’t delay. Unlike Morag, you might not get a second chance.

Pages – 7

Budget – Moderate. Locations include a church and a street corner. There’s also a matter of that Bollywood number I mentioned.

About the Reviewer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus. Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced. Dave would like to make it three. He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com. Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

About the Writer: KT Parker is a screenwriter and producer. She is currently producing her play, “The Chamber Of Beheaded Queens” (for the Page To Stage Festival in Liverpool, April 2016) and crowdfunding her way to Hollywood for the awards ceremony of Final Draft’s “Big Break” Contest, having won the period/historical/war category with her screenplay “A Face To Paint”.

You can connect with KT via a number of social media: 

Website: http://www.ktparker-online.com

IMDB page: http://www.imdb.me/ktparker

Twitter (me): https://www.twitter.com/lunaperla

Twitter (play): https://www.twitter.com/BeheadedQueens

Or shoot KT an email at KT “AT” ktparker-online.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

************

But WAIT – there IS much, much more!

 

Why? Because – there’s that little, teeny tiny thing called “Final Draft’s Big Break” contest – of which KT is one of the TOP 5 GRAND FINALISTS this year, for her historical feature A Face to Paint! On February 11th, she’ll be flying from the UK to Los Angeles for the ceremony – and making some rather essential Paramount Studio contacts. Which raises the delicate question of funding.

Please know: KT’s put together a modest Indie Go-Go project to get her where she and her award winning script needs to be. (You know the problem with writers and income? Seriously – that stuff never ends…)

So – please – take a look at it here:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/send-me-to-hollywood–3#/

Every little bit counts – and talent should always be awarded. Plus there are prizes for donations… of course!!

Friday, January 29, 2016

Hero’s Gift – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Hero’s Gift

A young boy learns that not all presents come in a box with a fancy wrapper. Some of the best presents are not even wrapped at all.

Christmas is a time of joy around the world for little boys and girls.

At least… most of them.

Despite having a not so jolly family life, Joey (5) still has high hopes for a visit from Santa. Breaking out the milk and cookies, Joey waits with baited breath to see what Kris Kringle has left for him. But when the big day arrives, all that’s waiting under that tree is the harsh truth. And a family that’s far from merry.

Holiday dreams crushed, Joey heads outside to greet the day – and runs across Walter (55), a “special emissary” from the North Pole. Taking the boy under his wing, Walter gives Joey words of encouragement… not to mention a very special present.

A life affirming story, Hero’s Gift is a dramatic tale destined to warm your heart – without schmaltzing you to death. Directors take note: whoever unwraps this script first is bound to light up any film festival audience!

About the writer: Born and raised in Sweden, Pia Cook is director of the short film “Them That’s Dead and writer of produced feature films “Finders Keepers: The Root of All Evil” and “Blackout“. She started writing screenplays in 2006 and has written over sixty short screenplays and ten features. (Yeah… that’s not a typo. Six ZERO.) She can be reached at gatortales – “AT” – gmail.

Pages: 5

Budget:Low. Interior and exterior of a two bedroom house will do the trick for the entire production.

About the reviewer:Brett Martin is an unrepped writer living in Los Angeles. He sold an action/thriller to Quixotic Entertainment, which is associated with Zack Snyder. He’s working on two new features as he continues his quest to be a professional screenwriter. He can be reached at soleil.rouge13 – “AT” – gmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Lady Eva – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Lady Eva
Part time reporter Tyler is about to have the interview of a lifetime.
Lady Eva’s life, that is…

A lady of the night who is just that: a lady.

Eva is a hooker. As a small-town prostitute, she is who the local faux-riche kids call when they’re looking for a good time. But tonight, she has a different kind of client.

Tyler is a part-time reporter for a local news magazine and is looking to do a story on the town’s thriving counter culture. During his first meeting though, Eva makes it clear that she is not some two-bit hustler looking to score fifty here and there. You see, she was once a member of the Lady’s Club, an elite escort service catering to the richest one percent. Trump? Naw, that was her friend, Cassie.

As the story develops Eva and Cassie introduce Tyler to the real counter culture, including coke, booze, and a particularly twisted situation involving a Speedo (and later lack thereof).

But behind it all, just who is Eva? Her trailer is littered with remnants of her formerly glam lifestyle. Particularly with souvenirs of a certain Sanderson (Sandy) Shore. The name sound familiar? Perhaps you’re read about the multi-millionaire in Forbes. It seems he and Eva have a special relationship, one that has survived the years and fates. As Tyler learns more about Eva, he learns just what a lady she is. Her story is definitely not what Tyler was expecting it to be.

Reporter driven narratives are all the rage today. This year alone, Spotlight, Truth, and Woman in Gold all used the reporter as an inquisitive tool into an otherwise difficult to access subject. Likewise, Lady Eva takes us by the hand and introduces us to a whole new world that was there all along. The script is set to be a prestige piece more Tangerine than Pretty Woman. Contemporary, relevant, and absolutely unflinching in its portrait of small-town prostitution while addressing larger issues of money, power, and the fall from grace.

So comb your hair, put on some cologne, you’ve got a date with a lady. Think you can handle her?

Pages: 29

Budget: Medium. Don’t be intimidated by the page count, the locations are limited. Diner, trailer, house. A flashback to a Park Avenue party and (spoiler) a funeral scene can be done on the cheap, or used as opportunities to show off.

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple is an attorney based in Hamburg, Germany. He has over 10 years experience with film and film theory and once got to kick-in a door for the German equivalent of CSI. He is currently writing that screenplay everybody keeps talking about: The Wild Age. Contact him at dane.whipple “AT” live.com

About the writer: A writer since the age of 12, the first book that Steve Clark ever read was Amityville Horror. The second was Cujo. He’s been writing ever since, and is currently hard at work on two features. He’s reachable at SAClark69 “AT” verizon.net (or on Long Island, if you’re in the area!!)

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

In Between – Short Script (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

In Between
No one said that (after) life would be easy…

Many people live their lives thinking that someday there will be a reckoning; a time to account for everything ever said or done. If you’ve been good, you get to go to where the good people go and if you’ve been bad, you can go to hell. Unless you are among a very select fictional few —like Jane Bingum from Drop Dead Diva—you don’t get another chance.

In Noland Bryand’s latest work, In Between, afterlife determinations turn out to be much more complex. Omni Potent has been tasked with the difficult job of finding a place for this assortment of souls. His waiting room often looks like a gathering at the Mos Eisley Cantina in Star Wars: Wickenites, beings from Black Eye Galaxy and the planets Cog, Klaken and Klax. Having to meet with so many clients who speak so many different languages and carry such long resumes sure makes staffing complicated: it would be so much easier if Jesus hadn’t hacked the system and if people could just die and then go to heaven…or hell.

Dead golfer Wilfred makes Omni’s job that much worse.

Wilfred closes the door behind him.

OMNI POTENT, a ball of majestic light, hovers over a large,
sturdy desk.

A large screen on the wall behind the desk.

OMNI POTENT
Take a seat.

A chair slides up behind Wilfred.
He sits down.

Finding a D class job for this man who completely messed things up on his last assignment is going to be a real drag. There is no way that Omni’ll be able to place him somewhere on Earth, despite Wilfred’s whining that special favor is in order for guys like him.

In Between combines the best of dramatic storytelling with its crazily creative construction of an alternate universe, with beings submerged in out-of-this-world circumstances. You won’t want to miss the chance to bring this one to life!

Pages: 11

Budget: Moderate. Some minor special effect work needed, such as hovering blobs of light…

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has begun work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: New to STS (though not now!) Nolan B. can be reached at nolanbryand1 “AT” gmail.com.  Having studied film as a minor at university, Nolan took a particular shine to the screenwriting side.  He’s been in the workforce for ten years since  – but recently rediscovered his passion… and intends to stick with it as it blooms and grows!  :)

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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