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Friday, July 29, 2016

So Dark the Series - posted by Don

Awesome news from Mark Renshaw

I thought I’d share a bit of good news which all started off on Simply Scripts.

Back in 2012, a script found on this website called So Pretty was produced. It was written by our very own James Williams and I helped produce it. A sequel followed called So Dark. Since then, development has slowly continued behind the scenes.

Recently it was repackaged and relaunched on Amazon as a web TV mini TV series in development. In only two months, these two ‘episodes’ have had over 210,000 views and yesterday was given a 100 Stars Award by Amazon.

See the Official FB page for further details.

dodark-theseries

Checkmate – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Checkmate
Two couples, two kids and a winter lodge. It’s family game night – who’s ready to play?

Sometimes games bring out the worst in people. What may begin as a friendly competition devolves into arguments over whether or not a ball was out-of-bounds, a certain move is allowed, or if a word can be found in the dictionary. In the worst cases, game-time disputes extend beyond the playing field or board, bleeding into everyday life and poisoning the competitors’ friendship—sometimes forever.

Take the folks in J.E. Clarke’s latest script, Checkmate, for example. Two couples, along with their adorable six-year olds are holed up in a toasty lodge while a winter storm rages outside. The six-year olds are sprawled out on the floor, thoroughly engaged in a game of Operation. The occasional buzzing of surgical errors and children bantering intermittently interrupts the more serious and contentious adult conversations taking place over wine and two chessboards at a nearby table. At one chessboard, the men.

At the other, the women.

Sally and George Callister are each respectively losing what they thought was their obvious advantage. Conceitedly trusting that she possesses superior intellectual skills to her opponent that would allow her to clinch this chess match, Sally becomes increasingly distressed and rude as Rhonda begins to show signs of winning.

Rhonda captures Sally’s bishop! Sally snags her wine glass, GULPS the liquid down.

SALLY
Damn, you’re good. Better than expected.

RHONDA
You thought you’d automatically win? Because you went to college… and I didn’t?

SALLY
I dunno. Maybe.

Sally glares at Rhonda.

SALLY
Fine – you’ve got more experience. You should’ve mentioned that before we decided on a game.

RHONDA
And take away the home team advantage? It’s not like I wanted to play.

As the games progress, it becomes increasingly apparent that perhaps none of the competitors really wants to play. But, the games are of vital importance. And, losing is NOT an option.

If you’re looking for a masterful piece that probes friendship in an unnerving fashion all the way to the endgame…it’s your move.

Number of pages: 8

Budget: Low. Scenes shot in a woods on a winter day, and an interior that resembles the inside of a cabin.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing. She may be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has placed QF and SF for feature lengths in Page, and has two feature length films optioned for 2016/2017: limited location horror “Containment.” and SF feature “Stream of Consciousness.” Her sociopolitical zombie short “Cured” has been recently produced by talented director Adam Zuehlke of Zenoscope Productions, and she currently has 20+ features and 60+ shorts available in her roster. Samples of that work can be read at www.philclarkejr.com/jec.html. Ms. Clarke can be reached directly at janetgoodman “at” yahoo.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

The Rust Garden – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

The Rust Garden
A woman has the unusual job of digging up the remains of a horrifying past. She never expected to encounter something equally terrifying and still very much alive in her own back yard.

Digging up the past, especially when it has involved brutality, murder or genocide is an all too delicate task. Holocaust memorials, museums and family histories serve to remind of Nazi atrocities. Truth commissions facilitate the healing process in countries battered by ruthless dictatorships. Perpetrators continue to be hunted and pursued through legal channels when possible. Inevitably, there exists a burning desire to achieve closure, honor the dead and scream “never again!” And, then there are others who just want revenge.

Steve Miles dark, dark drama, The Rust Garden, is set 70 years after the war in a forsaken site in Belarus where the dead far outnumber the living. The protagonist Ela and her young son live in the middle of this wasteland, where Ela works diligently each day digging up human remains. One day, as Ela’s son Namov looks on more in curiosity than horror, an elderly disabled stranger emerges from seemingly out of nowhere, shakily walks towards them and collapses.

Ela’s surprise turns to a growing concern when the sergeant who arrives at the scene, fails to show much curiosity and even less concern about the man and his unusual appearance. She realizes that given the stranger’s condition, he could not have traveled far before perishing before her eyes. Who was he? And, where did he come from? As soon as her son has left to visit his father, Ela ventures off in search of some answers.

Ela soon discovers that she has neighbors she never knew existed and that the ones she knew of are nothing like she could have possibly imagined. Her journey proves as painful and frightening as Franciszek Kalina’s, the Polish immigrant from Chicago in Pasikowski’s Aftermath without the catharsis that holocaust revenge movies like Phoenix or Inglorious Basterds offer, nor the comic relief that the latter’s excesses provide.

If you crave the opportunity to work with an awesome script that crafts a darkness that intensifies right through to the end, leaving audiences entirely unsettled, look no further than Miles’ The Rust Garden.

Number of pages: 16

Budget: Moderate. There are a number of specific props, several actors with specific physical characteristics and scenes in outdoor landscapes needed.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing. She may be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: Steve Miles decided to get serious about writing around three years ago. Since then he’s concentrated on putting together a collection of shorts with a goal of finishing up a feature or two by year-end. Oh, and giving George RR Martin a run for his money! Email him at stevemiles80 “AT” yahoo.co.uk

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

A Cure for Loneliness – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

A Cure for Loneliness
A psychiatrist searches for a way to connect his lonely patients.

Loneliness. One of the paradoxes of our time. We’re more “connected” to others in the world than ever thanks to technology, but no-one seems to be willing to connect in reality. Why bother to talk about the relative dullness of life when there’s eons of excitement available at your fingertips?

Our protagonist in A Cure for Loneliness, Joel, has both verbal and observational evidence to prove this point. As a psychiatrist, many of his patients confess their feelings of isolation to him in the office. And outside of work, his commute features the all too familiar sight of people addicted to the bleeps of their new iSurface Pro 7, and conversations between fellow residents of his high-rise flats are trite and depressingly short:

Joel pulls his mail from his box. Next to him, a WOMAN, professional, attractive stops to get her mail.

JOEL
Hello.

WOMAN
Hello.

Truly Shakespearean stuff. But neither person has any motivation to continue talking – they don’t know each other.

However, the motivation in arrives in the form of a sudden crime wave in Joel’s high-rise block. At first, it’s only a few break-ins, but as the offences escalate in seriousness, the community response escalates too. Locals begin to monitor the floors and organise fundraisers to upgrade security. Town hall meetings, usually emptier than a Donald Trump rally in Mexico become more packed than most trains at rush hour. Copious community cooperation returns. But at a price.

And will this price increase? Will the crime spree continue? Who’s behind the nefarious activities, and why?

Warning! A Cure for Loneliness has multiple side effects, like forcing your hands to applaud when the dose is fully digested. It also induces your brain into asking unpleasant questions. Why does it take negative events to bring people together? Do we need to rethink our relationship with technology? You’ll certainly have your own personal questions to ask after reading this script, so challenge yourself and delve right in to this one!

Pages: 8

Budget: Low to moderate. A few settings and good actors is all you need.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Richard Russell lives in North Carolina where he plays golf and writes. He has been writing since college when his short stories appeared in the university literary magazine. He loves writing screenplays, and THE CALL, written with his partner, Felice Bassuk, is one of their best. They have written an award-winning feature, THE KOI KEEPER, which they hope to see on the screen in the not too distant future. Richard has a trove of shorts and feature length screenplays and continues to add to the inventory. Writing remains the sole source of sanity in Richard’s chaotic world. Write to Richard at wordmstr007 “AT” gmail!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Congratulations to Damien Michael Aulsberry – Family Business Filmed! - posted by wonkavite

Tons of STS congratulations to writer Damien Michael Aulsberry, who is now celebrating the official Dublin shooting of his gritty and colorful crime short, Family Business.

Directed by the talented Oison Woods, the film brings together a great cast as well, including Bosco Hogan, Paul Ronan, Karl Shiels, Anthony Morris and Bern Deegan.

But fear not – if you’re a director who missed out, please be aware that Damien has more work available – including features, as well as shorts.  So hit him up – and get your “business” underway!

About the writer, Damien Michael Aulsberry: In Damien’s very personal words: “I write for therapeutic reasons. If I didn’t get all the mad shit out of me head, I’d be a lunatic…” What WE think is you’re a lunatic if you don’t give Damien’s work a read! That, and you can reach out to him directly at damien “AT” donovanprinting “DOT” com

Monday, July 25, 2016

A Visit With Pearl – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

A Visit with Pearl
When a lonely old man visits his beloved wife’s grave, he encounters a charming little girl who lifts him out of his doldrums and gives him hope.

Love and loss; it’s an age old theme brought to life with an elegant touch in Jason K. Allen’s A Visit With Pearl.

The scene: a cemetery in the country. A lonely grave. The name etched on the headstone: Pearl.

Old and barely able to walk (let alone sit down), Preston’s just mustered the courage to visit his wife’s resting place. A widower after fifty-five years of marriage, Preston still feels the fresh sting of grief, one year after her death.

At a loss, Preston talks to Pearl. Communing with nature… and silence.

Until company intrudes… in the form of a precocious pigtailed girl. Ignoring her mother a few feet away, the little girl skips over to Preston – filling his solemn moment with vibrant life. Not to mention the usual flurry of questions a child asks; innocent, straightforward and naively sweet.

Which ultimately makes Preston realize there’s more to life than loss. And that the world’s – sometimes more than what it seems.

Grab this one and do it justice. It’ll bring more than one tear to your eyes.

Pages: 8

Budget: You’ll need one location and three actors. The closer you can match Preston to the old man in Up, the better. Couple him with a small role for a woman and a spirited girl. And lots of nostalgia, as well.

About the reviewer: Rachel Kate Miller is a veteran of the feature animation industry, having worked on several Oscar winning films, bringing stories to life. In 2012, she left animation to move to Chicago and run the design department for President Obama’s reelection campaign. She is now living in New York, writing, consulting on various projects and creating an educational animated series for elementary students focused on engaging kids in science. Want to drop Rachel line? She can be reached at rachelkate.miller “AT” gmail!

About the writer: Jason K. Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, Tennessee. His produced short scripts include AMERICAN SOCK, which won Best Screenplay at the 2014 San Diego Film Awards, and AUTUMN LOVERS, winner of the Audience Award at the 2013 Artlightenment Festival in Nashville. He also wrote the feature film LUCKY FRITZ starring Julia Dietze (IRON SKY) and Corey Feldman. Jason is also a wilderness guide, nature photographer, and published author. See IMDB for his complete credits: www.imdb.com/name/nm3021924

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Original Script Sunday for July 24th - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are twenty one original scripts for your reading pleasure.

-Don

Friday, July 22, 2016

The Letter – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

The Letter
A captive prisoner makes an unlikely friend. But Wars of Words can be deadly as well….

Fantastical figures fascinate forever. The ogre is a pertinent example: from French folklore to the universally adored Shrek franchise, stories involving ogres have never waned in popularity, especially those that humanize these “monsters”.

The opening situation of The Letter, however, introduces us to a female ogre with no humanity whatsoever. In a dilapidated hut on the tallest mountaintop, where snow falls eternally, she holds young elf Aladan in captivity. Chained to the wall and in intense agony, he’s forced to write on the wall that physically restrains him.

Despite his situation, he’s not writing angry prose. He’s writing love stories! You see, his illiterate and mute detainer is enthralled by legendary tales of the heart, and forces Aladan to write and orate them for her.

Why romance stories? Because it turns out this big beast has a big heart for a fellow ogre. Sadly, her love isn’t reciprocated, and so she uses Aladan’s storytelling as a way to temporarily escape her sadness.

But Aladan claims he can permanently grant her happiness. How? By penning a love letter to her heartthrob! And of course, if the ogre finds true love, Aladan will be surplus to her requirements and be a free elf. So they begin creating the ultimate confession of adoration, all while forming a closer bond to one another along the way…

Yet this newly found friendship is meaningless if Aladan cannot win over the ogre’s heartthrob and win his freedom. Will he succeed? Or is the pen not as mighty as proverbs say it is? Only by reading the letter in The Letter will you find out!

Pages: 11

Budget: Mid-range. Of course, the FX could be lengthy if one wanted to go that way. Or it could be CGI. Or simply… implied!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: A fun guy with a wicked sense of humor, Jesus Diez Perez wears many hats: VFX, writer and director (just to name a few). Contact him at jdiezperez “AT” gmail.com! In his own words: I’m a writer, producer, director, editor and visual effects artist with experience in big companies like Weta or Lucasfilm. I love telling the untold stories, those that lurk in the shadows while the famous ones get told and retold. And I’m always looking for a different angle, with a new edge. For a list of my credits, please view them at IMDB here: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3925667/

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Interrogation – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Interrogation

An interrogator employs questionable methods to extract information from a suspect.

There’s something about a good torture scene that just… stays with you. You know what we’re talking’ about: the dentist scene from Marathon Man. The ear removal in Reservoir Dogs.

Yet, there’s a fine line between an exquisitely painful scene and gratuitous torture porn. Make no mistake – there is a difference. One is an example of high writerly art; admittedly of the squeamish kind. The other is pure sadism… the visual rendering of unpleasant corners of the human psyche that are best left unexpressed (or crushed by energetic bouts of electroshock.)

Ah, but when a scene is of that first variety? Cinematic stuff like that scars you for life – in a good way. And it’s impossible to forget. The visuals burrow into one’s mind like memory maggots, and take up permanent residence in one’s bleeding brain.

And that’s certainly the case with Interrogation, by Zach Jensen. A vicious little short, Interrogation takes place in – you guessed it – an interrogation room populated by two charming gentlemen: Agent Dawes and Simon – an unfortunate soul whose hand is strapped to the table. ‘Cause, you see, Agent Dawes has a hammer. And pliers. And an orange (don’t ask.) And really, really sharp paper.   And he knows how to use them. Not surprisingly, things get ugly.

Needless to say, the torture depicted is quite brutal. If that’s all this script had going for it, it’d still be memorable – and imaginative. But Interrogation does have more. The banter between Dawes and Simon is surprisingly witty. And mystery lingers in the air. Why is Simon there? And exactly what is Agent Dawes fishing for? Then there’s that twist. But never mind. I’ve said too much already…

If you’re a director with dark and twisted sensibilities, then you’d better open Interrogation quick. ‘Cause perps like Simon eventually crack. And scripts like this get optioned – causing delicious suffering along the way…

About the writer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota.  He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script.  If for some reason you want to learn more about him, you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog.

Pages: 6

Budget: Pretty low. But be sure not to skimp on a few solid practical FX. No need to show everything (subtlety can be a good thing.) But a touch of blood here and there will enhance your audience’s heebie-jeebies even more.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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    Back to Class by Hunter Vogt

    Six young high school teachers try to educate today's youth at the same high school they once attended. 37 pages
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