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Thursday, July 31, 2014

Numbers by Matias Caruso filmed! - posted by Don

Numbers (pdf format) by Matias Caruso (Mr. Z on the discussion board) has been filmed.

Two strangers with claircognizant abilities meet at a bar, learning shocking secrets about each other. (Short, Sci Fi 6 pages) First Place – Moviepoet’s July Contest.

Nick and Mia meets for the first time. They know nothing about each other and seem to know everything about everyone else. But sometimes the less you know, the better…

Discuss this script on the Discussion Board

Interrogation – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Interrogation

An interrogator employs questionable methods to extract information from a suspect.

There’s something about a good torture scene that just… stays with you. You know what we’re talking’ about: the dentist scene from Marathon Man. The ear removal in Reservoir Dogs.

Yet, there’s a fine line between an exquisitely painful scene and gratuitous torture porn. Make no mistake – there is a difference. One is an example of high writerly art; admittedly of the squeamish kind. The other is pure sadism… the visual rendering of unpleasant corners of the human psyche that are best left unexpressed (or crushed by energetic bouts of electroshock.)

Ah, but when a scene is of that first variety? Cinematic stuff like that scars you for life – in a good way. And it’s impossible to forget. The visuals burrow into one’s mind like memory maggots, and take up permanent residence in one’s bleeding brain.

And that’s certainly the case with Interrogation, by Zach Jensen. A vicious little short, Interrogation takes place in – you guessed it – an interrogation room populated by two charming gentlemen: Agent Dawes and Simon – an unfortunate soul whose hand is strapped to the table. ‘Cause, you see, Agent Dawes has a hammer. And pliers. And an orange (don’t ask.) And really, really sharp paper.   And he knows how to use them. Not surprisingly, things get ugly.

Needless to say, the torture depicted is quite brutal. If that’s all this script had going for it, it’d still be memorable – and imaginative. But Interrogation does have more. The banter between Dawes and Simon is surprisingly witty. And mystery lingers in the air. Why is Simon there? And exactly what is Agent Dawes fishing for? Then there’s that twist. But never mind. I’ve said too much already…

If you’re a director with dark and twisted sensibilities, then you’d better open Interrogation quick. ‘Cause perps like Simon eventually crack. And scripts like this get optioned – causing delicious suffering along the way…

About the writer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota.  He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script.  If for some reason you want to learn more about him, you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog.

Pages: 6

Budget: Pretty low. But be sure not to skimp on a few solid practical FX. No need to show everything (subtlety can be a good thing.) But a touch of blood here and there will enhance your audience’s heebie-jeebies even more.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

12 Angry Men (T.V. remake) teleplay - posted by Don

12 Angry Men - February 14, 1996 First Draft script by Reginald Rose – hosted by: Daily Script – in pdf format

Made for cable television remake of the 1957 classic about twelve jurors quick to condemn a Latino youth on trial for murdering his father before reviewing the evidence. Juror #8 holds out with a verdict of not guilty, thus setting the stage for arguments and reasons why or why not the boy may be guilty.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

Find this and more scripts over on the Movie Scripts page.

Lavender’s Blue – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Lavender’s Blue

“A young thief finds compassion in the unlikely source of his arresting officer.”

Never underestimate the power of an effective film title. It’s the attention-getter. Titles can be quite literal (for instance Godzilla, The King’s Speech, or My Best Friend’s Wedding.) Or you may need to watch the movie to figure it out the reference: ala Enough Said, Jacob’s Ladder, and The Shawshank Redemption. Depending on who’s in control on movie night, sometimes the title is all an audience member knows going in. But – whichever direction you choose – the title needs to be relevant and stand out!

In Lavender’s Blue, the meaning of the title is subtle – emerging slowly as the drama enfolds. As the script opens, world-weary veteran Inspector Foster and young Sergeant Watts interrogate a sullen teen accused of stealing… of all things, a lavender scented gift pack of toiletries.

After a few grueling rounds of good cop/bad cop – and one rather sneaky maneuver on Foster’s part – they figure out the boy’s name: 17 year old Chris Turner. More digging uncovers the surprising reason for Chris’ theft. Foster and Watts find themselves faced with a decision: throw the book at the unlucky perp. Or take pity on the kid – bringing him (and his stolen loot) on an unexpected side trip…

An award winning tale, Lavender’s Blue is subtly written with multiple layers; perfect for any director looking to produce an emotionally complex drama that’ll stay with their audience long after credits roll.

About the writer: Boasting an MA in Scriptwriting for Film, Theatre, TV & Radio, MJ is an award winning writer, with shorts optioned and produced in countries as diverse as Croatia and Norway. Residing in sunny England, she is currently hard at work developing a series with the BBC Writersroom – as well as working on a number of features (including one low-budget horror and a fantasy adventure script.) Her website is available here: redcatwriter.wordpress.com/. MJ herself can be reached via mjhermanny – AT – gmail!

Pages: 5

Budget: Relatively low. Settings include an interrogation room and a “hospital” type setting. For your four main characters, make sure to get actors with a strong and nuanced emotional range. Because this script deserves to be done properly!

About the reviewer for Lavender’s Blue:California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

A Ghost in the Embers – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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A Ghost in the Embers

It’s 1883. A lone cowboy beds down out on the open prairie and watches as the smoke from his campfire morphs into a ghostly shape. And not just any ghost — Billy the Kid!

There’s nothing more classic than a Western. Just picture it: a lonely cowboy out on the prairie, accompanied by his horse and howling coyotes. Even if you’re not a fan of the genre, scenes like that just have style. Pair those elements with a ghost story told around a crackling campfire? That’s one heck of a pairing; kind of like marshmellows and chocolate. Or – if you’re the protagonist of Ghost – a tasty can of beans…

…. maybe that’s not as good as S’mores, but it keeps a fella’s belly full. When Ghost in the Embers opens, our hero (the Cowpoke) has just settled down in his bedroll. Just him, his horse “Dastardly” and the vast open sky.

As the campfire crackles, a strange smoke rises from it – forming the ghostly shape of a man. Billy the Kid! For a dead guy, Billy looks good. And surprisingly active, too. Before our narrator can rub the sleep from his eyes, Billy’s dropped down into gunfighter pose. The Cowpoke “dead” in his sights.

A stand-off ensues… between an ancient cowboy, and the fastest draw in the West (even if he has been cold in his grave for two years.)

When the ghostly bullets fly, who will win?

Whoever snaps up this short. Western campfire tales have always been an audience pleaser. Paired with a dash of supernatural suspense, this is one mixed genre script that hits the bulls-eye.

About the writer: Scott & Paula Merrow are a husband and wife screenwriting team. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy,… the whole nine yards.

Pages: 7

Budget: Relatively low. Two main characters, a horse, and one location outdoors. The ghost effects are easily done in post.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Chronicle screenplay - posted by Don

Chronicle - undated, unspecified draft script by Max Landis (based on a story by Josh Trank and Max Landis) – hosted by: Daily Script – in pdf format

Whilst attending a party, three high school friends gain superpowers after making an incredible discovery underground. Soon, though, they find their lives spinning out of control and their bond tested as they embrace their darker sides.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

Find this and more scripts over on the Movie Scripts page.

Snow Day – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Snow Day

A grumpy old man spends a snowy day with his granddaughter.

In these jaded times, it’s easy to forget how lovable movies can be. Remember the first time you saw It’s a Wonderful Life? Christmas Story? Mary Poppins or Chitty Chitty Bang Bang? Even if you’re a movie buff who mainlines Quentin Tarantino for breakfast, there’s something to be said for taking a break… and catching a heartwarming flick every once in awhile.

Snow Day is one of those stories. Cantankerous old Frank, 60s, isn’t the most pleasant person to spend time with… especially if you’re related to him. Unfortunately for his granddaughter Roxanne, Frank’s been charged with babysitting her for the day. Neither one’s looking forward to the experience. Barricaded inside the house on a winter’s day, the two resign themselves to an afternoon of crayons. But as snow comes down, the two bond. And Frank’s heart begins to thaw…

An intelligent little script with great dialogue, Snow Day is sweet and lovable. Sometimes, that’s exactly what we need.

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie. He can be reached at dtroop506 “AT” gmail.com.

Pages: 8

Budget: Some snow and a house. It doesn’t get easier (or more nostalgic) than this!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Original Script Sunday - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are twenty four original works. Check ‘em out.

- Don

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Orphan Black and Avatar and Korra - posted by Don

Over on the TV Scripts and Transcripts page we have the teleplays of the first two episodes of Orphan Black. And, thanks to Wes for the heads up on two excellent websites featuring everything about Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra including transcripts of episodes of the shows.

- Don

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