SimplyScripts.com - Read Movie Scripts Online

Friday, October 31, 2014

Notes from a Veteran Writer – “Will You Read My Script?” (P.J. McNeill) - posted by wonkavite

“Will you read my script?”

A few years back, Josh Olson, the screenwriter of A History of Violence, wrote a scathing piece for the Village Voice titled “I Will Not Read Your Fucking Script”. It was a complex piece with a subtle thesis: I will not read your fucking script. Needless to say, it made waves within the screenwriting community and generated a lot of discussion. Some people thought Olson was a dick (::raises hand::) and some people thought the guy had a point. To be more specific, I did think he had a point, but that doesn’t change the fact that he was being a dick doing it.

What the article failed to acknowledge is that, as budding young screenwriters, there is A LOT of pressure put on us to hustle our scripts. When I first moved out to Los Angeles, I immediately gained a connection to a VERY successful screenwriter. I used that connection simply to chat the guy up, ask a few questions and enjoy the rare chance to talk to a professional writer. Later on, I had coffee with a young producer, who chastised me for not pushing my latest script on him. I told her that I didn’t think it was right to push my script on such a tenuous connection, but she pushed and argued to the point where I came around to the idea. That night, I contacted the screenwriter and asked him if he would read my script. I never heard back. I immediately felt very stupid for doing it, and to this day, regret severing that connection with such a request. I acted as if the guy owed me something…as if I was the ONLY person who had ever met him, and then – within a week – asked him to read something. I treated him like an opportunity, not a person.

It doesn’t help that this is how it’s done. In my very first blog post, I wrote about a guy I knew who gave his script to someone and then watched it get passed around like wildfire, only to end up in the hands of a Sony executive, who then bought it. When you hear a story like this, you can’t help but want to share it with everyone you see. Any person could be your big break. And really, what other option do we have? We have connections or we have cold calling/querying.

I think the problem is two-fold, and it’s on both sides of the equation. First, the person you’re giving the script to: odds are they’re a professional, and doing much better than you. They’re most likely so far gone from the time when they were an amateur, that they don’t remember what it’s like. And most importantly: they don’t HAVE to remember. That part is over for them. Also, a lot of them develop a kind of “I had to claw my way to the top, so you do too” kind of attitude. They forget that, in almost every case, their success was probably achieved by someone doing them a favor. But like I said, they don’t have to think about that anymore.

The other side of the equation is you. The obvious part of your side of the equation is that you probably don’t realize just how many people ask them to read their screenplays. The not so obvious part of the equation is the dream. What is the dream? It’s that nagging little feeling in the back of your head that this – will – be – it. You’re going to give them your screenplay, and they’re going to like it so much, they’re going to pass it to their agent, a producer, an executive, whoever. You may give it to them under the guise that you want “feedback” or you “just want to know what they think of it”, but we all know what you really want. I’ve done it too. You want praise. You want success. You don’t want to hear what’s wrong with it. I’ve had many people ask me to read their screenplays under this guise, and get REALLY PISSED (or break off communication entirely) when I’m mildly critical of it. So you – the screenwriter – must come to terms with what you’re asking for. Because the person you’re giving it to sure as hell knows.

Giving your screenplay to people is a MUST in this industry. It has to be done. But like I’ve always said, it’s better if you treat the person you’re giving it to AS A PERSON, not an opportunity. Be real with them. Don’t hide your intentions under something you don’t really want. And most importantly, if you see Josh Olson, ask him to read your screenplay. Because seriously, fuck that guy.

About the writer: A talented writer and 10 year veteran of the industry, “P.J. McNeill” has seen it all (and he’s ready to kiss and tell.) Got a question, a comment or just general bile /praise you want to spew?  Email PJ at pjscriptblog@gmail.com.

 

Thursday, October 30, 2014

The Midnight Meat Train screenplay - posted by Don

The Midnight Meat Train – Undated, unspecified draft script by Jeff Buhler (based on Clive Barker’s short story “The Midnight Meat Train” – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

The photographer Leon lives with his girlfriend and waitress Maya waiting for a chance to get in the photo business. When Maya contacts their friend Jurgis, he schedules a meeting for Leon with the successful owner of arts gallery Susan Hoff; she analyzes Leon’s work and asks him to improve the quality of his photos. During the night, the upset Leon decides to wander on the streets taking pictures with his camera, and he follows three punks down to the subway station; when the gang attacks a young woman, Leon defends her and the guys move on. On the next morning, Leon discovers that the woman is missing.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

The Mating Dance – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

 The Mating Dance

When it comes to Romance, listening to advice can lead to unexpected results…

Ah – the love story. Nowadays, almost every movie has one. Even genre movies throw in a handful of romance. Milk, Iron Man, The Wolf of Wall Street. Even the animated hit Frozen gets in its share of kissy-cuddly action. It’s almost a required sub-plot B.

For the romantic-comedy, of course, relationships take center stage. Two people “meet-cute.” Life throws obstacles in their way – simultaneously tearing them apart, yet bonding them subtly closer. Just as they realize they’re meant for each other, a misunderstanding causes a tragic break up. Ultimately, the couple reconcile and kiss. The curtain falls. The last scene fades.

Yep, getting to “Happily Ever After” requires some choreographed steps. But even if you’ve heard this song before, doesn’t mean you’ve seen the latest moves.

In her short The Mating Dance, talented writer Marnie Mitchell-Lister puts a fun, original spin on that never-ending ballad of romance…

Separate guests at the Hilton, singles Jake and Marla literally bump into each other at the reservation desk. Their bags become entangled, resulting in several clumsy “dance steps”. When they finally break free, an embarrassed Jake heads for the hotel lounge. Sure, Marla’s cute and all. But Jake’s recently divorced. It’s been awhile since he’s been in the game. To kill time before his flight, Jake impulse-buys a book at the convenience stand: The Mating Dance for Men, by Ramesh Kumar. May as well read up on the latest tips…

After signing out, Marla also stops by the stand. And a book catches her eye. The Mating Dance for Women, by Dr. Padima Sanghi-Kumar. She grabs it, making sure no-one sees… and settles in to read as well.

We all know what comes next. The couples’ eyes meet. Then an awkward pause – mutual attraction in the air. Soon, the Mating Dance begins in earnest. Awkward introductions. Stammered “lines”. The two stumble toward Getting to Know Each Other, aided by contradictory advice from their hidden books. Yep, Jake and Marla could use some guidance. But will they find their rhythm, or drive each other away?

Like the best romance comedies, TMD doesn’t take itself too seriously: alternating “voice-overs” from the books with awkward dialogue between the couple. (Anyone who’s been through a bad first date knows exactly what that’s like.) You’ll be rooting for Jake and Marla instantly. And you’ll want to read this to the end. Because happily-ever-after doesn’t happen when a couple meets. It always clicks at the end.

Comedy indie directors take note… This is one script worth choosing as your dance partner. A fun premise, and easy to film, it won’t be single for too long!

About the writer: Having completed 9 features and over 70 shorts, Marnie Mitchell-Lister has no plans on stopping. Currently, she’s working on a variety of projects; an animated feature, a psychological thriller and a TV pilot about a bored housewife whose quest for excitement gets her in all sorts of trouble. Some of Marnie’s work can be found on her website: www.brainfluffs.com.

Pages: 6

Budget: Three simple interiors: a hotel lobby, the hotel lounge, and a shuttle. Two main characters, a couple extras, and two actors with distinctive voices to provide voiceover dialogue, preferably with catchy accents.

About the reviewer: California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Let Me In screenplay - posted by Don

Let Me In – February 2, 2009 first draft script by Matt Reeves (based on the novel by John Ajvide Lindqvist) – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

A twelve year-old Owen is a lonely and outcast boy bullied in school by Kenny and two other classmates; at home, Owen dreams of avenging himself against the trio of bullies. He befriends his twelve-year-old next door neighbor, Abby, who only appears during the night in the playground of their building. Meanwhile, Abby’s father is a wanted serial-killer who drains the blood of his victims to supply Abby, who is actually an ancient vampire.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Til Death – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Til Death

A marital tiff erupts to epic proportions.

 Married couples can find s-o-o-o many things to bicker about. Toilet seat up, toilet seat down, stop hogging the covers, I-don’t-like-the-panties-drying-on-the-rod*. You know, that sort of thing.

For Paul and Jenna, it’s the fancy towels — specifically, how could Paul have had the audacity to actually use them, when he knows damn well they were Jenna’s favorite wedding gift!

In this wildly humorous short, award winning screenwriter Rick Hansberry zeroes in on just how crazy domestic skirmishes can get. As the battle lines in this tale are drawn, Paul and Jenna find every possible way to push each others’ buttons: power tools, flushing the toilet while the shower’s being used, and multiple viewings of Sex and the City (oh, the Humanity!) Reminiscent of Woody Allen or Neil Simon, the snarky, quick witted dialogue escalates to def-con four quickly. It begins with a raging thunderstorm – and ends with a wild-west shootout. Including cleavage. And power tools.

A sneering, jeering bundle of fun, ‘Til Death is totally character driven, and super simple to produce. Did we mention relatable? Well, for some of us it is… :)

About the writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” His first feature is set to be released in Spring 2015. Trailer available here. He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

Pages: 5

 Budget: Micro.

About the reviewers: Scott & Paula Merrow are a husband and wife screenwriting team. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy,… the whole nine yards. They’re reachable at scott-paula “AT” comcast.net

* Especially during that time of month, when my friends are coming over for the game.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

The Twilight Saga: Eclipse - posted by Don

The Twilight Saga: Eclipse – July 14, 2009 blue draft script by Melissa Rosenberg – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

Bella once again finds herself surrounded by danger as Seattle is ravaged by a string of mysterious killings and a malicious vampire continues her quest for revenge. In the midst of it all, she is forced to choose between her love for Edward and her friendship with Jacob — knowing that her decision has the potential to ignite the struggle between vampire and werewolf. With her graduation quickly approaching, Bella is confronted with the most important decision of her life.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

O-Beast – Feature Length Bonus Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop Features

O-Beast

A chubby teen is nearly killed in a bullying incident… imbued with supernatural powers, her fat terrorizes the town for revenge

Horror movies just seem so dull these days. Don’t get us wrong: exorcisms, hauntings and found footage slashers… all these sub-genres have their place. But when compared to horror in the Eighties? Something just seems – missing. Movies such as Reanimator, Evil Dead, Chucky, The Stuff. Such films could never be called high art. But they were creative, colorful and weirdly fun. And isn’t that what we go to movies for?

Fortunately, some horror writers haven’t forgotten the good old days. Case in point: the horror-satire O-Beast.

Written as an homage to the Eighties (kind of like Scary Movie on steroids), O-Beast is gleefully crazy, and stuffed with intentional cliches. The class slut, the mean jock and his clique. Then there’s the downtrodden fat chick everyone makes fun of. Her name: Monica Bomer. Or as everyone calls her: The Bomer. Three hundred pounds. Riddled with acne and despair. Except for her camp counselor (Native American Chief Hokem Runningwater), Monica has absolutely no friends. But then she runs into Paul, the mysterious – yet cool – new kid at school. Things are finally looking up. Until a bullying incident with the jock sends Monica plummeting off an overpass. The height’s enough to kill normal people. Fortunately, Monica’s protected by layers of blubber – which explode out of her on impact. She’s left in a coma – but alive.

As for the fat? The local cops leave that on the side of the road, for the vultures. Since the jock’s the Mayor’s son, the case is instantly closed. But is really over?

Especially when the fat starts to merge. It takes on a life of its own – seeking disgusting, vile revenge.

With each victim, the fat grows. Soon it reaches epic proportions; wreaking havoc on everything from a Camero to a Ferris Wheel. (Seriously.) The whole town’s in peril. Only Paul can stop the horror – aided by the powers of Chief Runningwater. Can the Fat be stopped, and Monica saved?

Streamlined and just under 80 pages, O-Beast is a breeze to read. Chock full of Eighties in-jokes and tongue in cheek humor, O-Beast feels like the bastard child of The Blob and Toxie the Avenger… with laugh-out loud moments.

And the effects are do-able. (You’ll need some CG or buckets of toy Slime to make it work.) But if you’re an indie horror director looking for something REAL different, O’Beast is your girl. She’s hefty and weird. But tons of fun.

About the writer, Rod Thompson: Rod Thompson is an award winning screenwriter of both features and shorts. His feature, “The Squire” won Best Drama for the 2014 Table Read My Screenplay contest, and he has placed numerous times for his shorts at MoviePoet.com. His short scripts “Gimme Shelter” and “A Memory in Winter” have both been optioned through their exposure on SimplyScripts.com’s “Shootin’ The Shorts.” He is also “the most humble man alive.”

Pages: 79

Budget: Throw in a bunch of teens, CG and you’re fine.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Monday, October 27, 2014

Oblivion screenplay - posted by Don

Oblivion – March 27, 2011 draft script by William Monahan (current revisions by Karl Gajdusek (based on the story by Koseph Kosinski)) – hosted by: SciFiScripts – in pdf format

One of the few remaining drone repairmen assigned to Earth, its surface devastated after decades of war with the alien Scavs, discovers a crashed spacecraft with contents that bring into question everything he believed about the war, and may even put the fate of mankind in his hands.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Heart of Coal – Short Script (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Heart of Coal

A renowned female psychologist ruminates over serial killer personalities – and the horror they’ve wreaked on her  life…

Narration. Voice-over. For some, it’s a film gimmick that grates on the nerves. But when done right, it can be spectacular. Don’t believe us? Try on a few of these films on for size.

Annie Hall: stand-up comedian Alvy Singer recounts his neurotic, titular love affair. Goodfellas: Henry Hill describes his evolution from small time crook to valued Mobster, and fall from grace to Informant. The Usual Suspects: Roger “Verbal” Kint weaves a tale of five random members from a police line-up, and the evil Keyser Soze. Speaking of Kevin Spacey and voiceovers, what about American Beauty?

All classic films told through the eyes of the narrator. And that’s the power of “V.O”. In the hands of a skilled screen writer, the voice of the narrator can lift a film to new heights. Add complex dimension to a story, and set the proper tone from page One… whether it be comedic, dramatic, or – in the case of Heart of Coal – downright chilling.

Dr. Lianne Berg’s life has had its ups and downs. A child psychologist who works with autistic children, she’s successful, young and gorgeous. A woman driven to succeed by horrors in her own childhood. Only nine when her mother was killed in front of her – stabbed to death sixty-seven times and beheaded. The serial killer never captured. Not surprisingly, the working of such dysfunctional minds became Dr. Berg’s obsession. As the script progresses, her voice drives the narrative; providing a glimpse into her separate worlds. Professional insights on the motives of such monsters, and her own nightmarish memories: how they’ve warped and shaped her life…

Stylishly written and streamlined, Heart of Coal is a deliciously demented script. And an amazing showcase for a thirtyish actress with just the right voice. With the right cast and smart editing, this script is an amazing find. Do this one right, and create a true horror masterpiece!

About the writer: Born and raised in Sweden, Pia Cook has SEVERAL produced features and shorts to her name (full IMDB credits here.) She started writing screenplays in 2006 and has written over sixty short screenplays and ten features. (Yeah… that’s not a typo. Six ZERO.)

Budget: Moderate. There are some locations inside a hospital and a Senator’s office. And a few extras to hire. Not to mention some blood and horror FX. But nothing to lose your head over. (Talk about an unfortunate choice of words!)

About the reviewer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie. He can be reached at dtroop506 “AT” gmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR VIEW OTHER SCRIPTS AT THE STS BLOG HERE

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

Search with Google

    Google
    Web SimplyScripts

The October One Week Challenge is on!

Award Season Screenplays

Featured SimplyScripts Blogs


ScriptSearch

Advertisement

More Navigation

Latest Entries

Categories

Script of the Day
October 31, 2014

Award Season Screenplays

Advertisement

Donate

Advertisement



Writers I dig

Advertisement

Search Amazon

Search Sheet Music

Search All Posters

SimplyScripts Newsletter

    Subscribe to the SimplyScripts Newsletter