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Thursday, August 28, 2014

A Day with Death – Official Trailer - posted by Don

Congrats to Breanne. Her script A Day with Death has been filmed. Check out the official trailer.

A Day with Death – Official Trailer # 1 (HD) from asurftv on Vimeo.

A cantankerous sixty-five-year-old woman has a few things to do before she goes and Death will just have to hold off. Along the way the two become unlikely companions.

Interestingly enough, it turns out that this particular Reaper is a tall young lady whom Margaret quickly nicknames “Kulapo.” Being the charming lady that she is, Margaret convinces Kulapo to accompany her through the town for one day – tying up “loose ends.” Along the way, they develop a bond…

Written By Breanne Mattson
Produced, Directed & Edited By Asurf Oluseyi
Production Manager – Larry Homs Ahmed

Talk about it on the Discussion Board.

- Don

Adaptationing Night School – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Adaptationing Night School

A screenplay writer runs into trouble when his lunatic twin stops by to help…

(Warning – adult language and situations)

Some scripts defy explanation. And logic. And sanity…. Yet somehow they still make sense (after a dose of LSD.) Some rather classic titles fall into this category: Blue Velvet, Donny Darko, and Being John Malkovich are some examples. While not universally loved – or understood – there’s a certain appeal that such scripts bring. When faced with a steady diet of Hollywood cookie-cutter films, craziness can feel fresh. And good.

While not as psychedelic as Naked Lunch, “Adaptationing Night School” falls into this general genre: a slightly unhinged breath of fresh air.

A strange little script, Adaptationing opens with nebbish protagonist Noel. Unattractive with a receding hairline, he’s Paul Giamatti on a real bad day. Plunking away at his laptop, he’s also a wanna-be screenwriter. His class assignment (adapting a novel) is due in only ten hours. And he’s barely gotten past fade-in. Enter Leon: Noel’s identical twin brother. Fun-loving and crazy, Leon’s everything Noel isn’t. Not to mention pushy. Within minutes of arrival, he gets an earful of Noel’s writing woes and takes charge. He dictates changes in the script and arranges a “school trip” to the local booze n’ dive: in the name of “research”, of course.

At that point, things get weird. Like they weren’t already. Guided by Leon’s voice-over narrative, a few characters (including Noel’s snarky writing teacher Sparkman) appear and disappear. When Noel refuses to meet cute with the local barflies, Leon impersonates his brother – and picks up well-endowed lush Maureen. The three head back to Noel’s with the intention of (cough) getting to know each other. What happens then? Well, everything goes even more to hell even more…

Will every audience like Adaptationing? Hell, no. Probably not even the majority. Scripts like this are an acquired taste: like Octopus and Thousand Year Old Duck eggs. But this script is a writing gem, full of quoteable lines. Sparkman’s are particularly standout. Check out Adaptationing if you like your stories somewhat skewed. And have David Lynch sensibilities… J

About the writer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota.  He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script.  If for some reason you want to learn more about him, you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog.

Pages: 17

Budget: About the only thing that’s not crazy about this script. Settings include an apartment, a bar and some street scenes. No FX needed. Characters include Noel, Leon, Maureen, Sparkman and a handful of extras.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Predominantly Blue – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Predominantly Blue

A mother makes a special baby quilt.

Writing a short screenplay requires specialized skill. Hyper-streamlined language – evoking a maximum of visuals. A defined beginning, middle and (satisfying) end – contained in the tiniest of boxes.

Imagine the box just got smaller. Much like the introductory scenes of Pixar’s “Up”, Predominantly Blue has all the emotional power of a big Hollywood tear-jerker. Delivered in less than two pages. And a scant two lines of dialogue.

The script opens quietly. Karen (30s) works late into the night sewing a baby quilt. The color’s predominantly blue. Her husband Greg sneaks in to check on her. Together, they stand at the foot of their infant son Michael’s crib. The perfect family personified. But there’s a shadow of something else in the room. Remnants of something that is no more.

Within the next half a page, the full meaning behind author Kay P. Mackie’s careful details are unveiled. Literally punching readers in the gut. Speaking as a veteran writer, I’ve reviewed hundreds of shorts. Yet Predominantly Blue has haunted me through the years. The sadness of the script never wanes. Your heart breaks over, and over again.

The perfect script for a “serious” director, PB features virtually no dialogue – relying on skilled cinematography and acting to tell its tale. Choose your talent for this one wisely. It’s sure to be a film festival favorite.

About the writer: California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com… And kpmackk “AT” gmail.

Pages: One+

Budget: Minimal.   Three main characters.  A house.  A church load of extras.  Make a small donation, and film on Sunday.

About the reviewer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie. He can be reached at dtroop506 “AT” gmail.com.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author

 

 

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

The Haunting screenplay - posted by Don

The Haunting - July 30, 1998 early draft script by David Self – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

When Eleanor, Theo, and Luke decide to take part in a sleep study at a huge mansion they get more than they bargained for when Dr. Marrow tells them of the house’s ghostly past.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More on the Movie Scripts page.

Bringing Dad Home – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Bringing Dad Home

A son arrives to collect his estranged father and his possessions – but finds something more. Old memories…

 A long, long time ago. In an era far, far away… There were a special breed of books, entitled “Choose Your Own Adventure.” Kind of like a video game, the reader was in charge of where the tale would lead. At certain pages, the narrative would split – leaving the audience to choose Path A or B. It was a brilliant novelty – loved by young readers of the time.

With Bringing Dad Home, screenwriter Zach Jansen brings this very concept to visual life… creating a narrative that must be shot for split screen. The premise of the story may sound basic. But the combined result is genius.

The script follows Richard – a man in his forties – as he arrives at a nursing home to pick up his Dad. As he walks through the facility, he chats with the nursing home administrator – the dialogue subtle and vague. Why has Richard arrived after all these years? That much (and more) isn’t clear.

Arriving at his father’s room, Richard rummages through a suitcase of belongings – including several photographs. As he fumbles through the faded pictures, Richard’s memories flashback. To a father who doesn’t believe in perfection. Who judges and criticizes his son at every turn. In a true Cat’s in the Cradle moment, Richard recalls an exchange with his own son; a turning point when he almost parrots his father’s harsh words. Then he stops and compliments the boy. The underlying emotional theme is a universal one: Richard’s scream and promise to the world that he won’t end up like his father…

But what comes next is less familiar. As the story morphs into it’s own Choose Your Own Adventure, the viewer is given a choice of two alternatives. One leads to reconcilation for Richard. The other to… we won’t tell. It’s a classic fork in the road. And no-one can dictate which path to take.

As is the case with real life, Bring Home Dad doesn’t wrap up ends nicely. It lacks that “Kaiser Soze – Sixth Sense” moment that shorts are so known for. But – if brought to life properly – it’s guaranteed to stand apart in festivals and short film competitions. It’s the sort of watermark script that a director can leave their personal stamp on. And leave the audience discussing long afterwards….

About the Writer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota.  He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script.  If for some reason you want to learn more about him – which of course you DO! – you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog. He can be reached at Zach.Jansen “AT” mail.com

 Pages: 6

 Budget: Moderate. You’ll need a several extras, a “nursing home”, and a handful of outdoor locations. But – as is true with most dramas – the most important ingredient will be the right actors.

About the Reviewer: Rod Thompson currently serves on Active Duty in the United States Navy, with fifteen years of honorable service. In the past ten years he has written numerous award-winning short scripts, with five (or so) having been produced. He recently won Best Drama in 2014’s “Table Read My Screenplay” feature length contest. Rod can be reached at rodthompson1980 “AT” gmail.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Monday, August 25, 2014

Always Bad – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Always Bad

A woman searches for her missing daughter… with a child predator on the loose.

Where is my child?

It’s a question – THE question – that no parent ever wants to have to ask themselves. Almost daily, parents lose track of a child for a few seconds. In those moments, your throat parches worse than the Sahara, the world spins like a Kaleidoscope, and the muscles in the back of your neck pull piano-wire taut. If you’re a parent, you’re familiar with the sinking feeling: the last fleeting microseconds before falling into the pit of pure panic.

Zach Jansen’s Always Bad evokes those distressing sensations… seen through the eyes of Mary, a single mother whose young daughter is lured away from home by a mysterious stranger known only as “Kevin.”

As the script opens, an exhausted Mary washes dishes in the sink – keeping one eye on her daughter Anna Beth, playing with dolls just outside. A lot can be read from the weariness in Mary’s eyes. There’s a darkness somewhere in her past. An evil that just won’t go away.

As Mary focuses on her chores, Kevin emerges from a wooded area nearby. A soft spoken man in nice clothes… clearly out of place. A Wolf in Grandmother’s clothing. Stranger Danger personified. Engaging Anna Bell in casual conversation, he asks her to help him find something he lost… and leads the unsuspecting girl away.

Mary looks up. Anna Beth’s gone. A parent’s worse nightmare!

Rushing outside, a terrified Mary searches the neighborhood – fearing she may already be too late.

One of the cardinal rules of film-making is to “show it, don’t tell it.” Words may be powerful… but visuals – when done properly – are mightier. And so it is with Always Bad, a story driven more by emotion than dialogue. Though he speaks little, Kevin’s character shines through before his third line of dialogue. And Mary? Well, her actions speak louder than words. Actors crave characters like these – as will your audience. With the right casting, Always Bad is one drama that speaks to the most primal of a viewer’s fears. For parents, anyway.

About the Writer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota.  He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script.  If for some reason you want to learn more about him – which of course you DO! – you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog. He can be reached at Zach.Jansen “AT” mail.com

Pages: 5

Budget: Low-to-No Budget: only three characters, and two settings (an apartment and a yard outside.)

About the Reviewer: Rod Thompson currently serves on Active Duty in the United States Navy, with fifteen years of honorable service. In the past ten years he has written numerous award-winning short scripts, with five (or so) having been produced. He recently won Best Drama in 2014’s “Table Read My Screenplay” feature length contest.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Scripts of the 7 Week Challenge – A Time to Forget by Eric Wall - posted by Don

Writers were challenged to write a script in 7 weeks. The genre: Thriller. The theme: Male lead about 50 years old. Race against the clock. The gist: Assume a male actor in his 50′s, in good physical shape, is looking for a mid to high budget “Race-Against-The-Clock Thriller”.

Each day, one script from the 7 week challenge will be featured. And finally…

A Time to Forget by Eric Wall (EWall433)

An assassin’s memory is erased in preparation for a hit on the President of Palestine, but when he begins to question his employer’s motives, his mission turns into a race against time to discover his true identity. 112 pages (pdf format)

Discuss this script on the Discussion Board

Original Script Sunday for August 24th - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are fifteen original scripts for your reading pleasure.

- Don

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Scripts of the 7 Week Challenge – A Journalist’s Riposte by Arty Whale - posted by Don

Writers were challenged to write a script in 7 weeks. The genre: Thriller. The theme: Male lead about 50 years old. Race against the clock. The gist: Assume a male actor in his 50′s, in good physical shape, is looking for a mid to high budget “Race-Against-The-Clock Thriller”.

Each day, one script from the 7 week challenge will be featured. Next up…

A Journalist’s Riposte by Arty Whale (ArtyDoubleYou)

A journalist must fight his way through a team of deadly mercenaries, all while trying to figure out not only why they want him dead, but their more sinister of intentions. 100 pages (pdf format)

Discuss this script on the Discussion Board

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