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Tuesday, October 6, 2015

The Bear – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

The Bear

An elderly woman faces torment and exploitation at her nursing home — until an unexpected friend comes to her aid.

The decision to place a loved one in a nursing home is always difficult. Learning of abuse at a facility can turn a family’s loving decision into a nightmare. One can only imagine how frightening it is for a senior who has no family to protect them.

Margo Fleming, the protagonist in The Bear, does her best to fend off Pete’s violence. However, she is old, frail, and terrifyingly alone. Pete – a sleazy orderly – is after Margo’s teddy bear, a stuffed animal that the old woman takes with her everywhere and fearlessly defends. As a result, Pete’s convinced that the bear must harbor something valuable in its stuffing. And he’s determined to get his hands on it. By violence, if necessary.

Staff at the facility where she lives sees what’s going on, but Pete effectively scares them off by threatening to use his powerful connections to retaliate if they intervene.

As Margo comes up with strategies to thwart Pete’s plans, someone is watching… and waiting for a chance to take matters into their own hands.

Will Pete’s horrible plans be thwarted? Or will Margo become yet another senior home statistic? And, what secrets does Margo’s teddy bear hold anyway?

Writer Steven Clark’s work is suspense-filled and touching – with just the right amount of comic relief as it navigates the difficult subject of elderly abuse. Viewers will love the layers of surprises that await them in The Bear.

And there’s no doubt in our minds that festival audiences will love it as well.

Pages: 6

Budget: Moderate. Scenes with numerous actors in an assisted living facility.

About the writer: A writer since the age of 12, the first book that Steve Clark ever read was Amityville Horror. The second was Cujo. He’s been writing ever since, and is currently hard at work on two features. He’s reachable at SAClark69 “AT” (or on Long Island, if you’re in the area!!)

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She has always loved to write, but only recently has begun to work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.





All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, October 5, 2015

The Seashell – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

The Seashell

Don’t believe everything you hear. Even inside a seashell…

Picture yourself on a casual weekend stroll. The sun shines over the horizon; it beckons to you, toasty warm… promising the perfect day. Could it be better? Of course it could.

Mr. Director, set that scene. Add sand crunching under your toes. A crashing surf which rolls smoothly by. Yep, that’s right – you’re at the beach! Insert some seashells to collect, and the ambiance is… ideal.

Especially when you pick one up and put it to your ear. You hear the echo of the ocean, just inside. Or something else. An unexpected sound.

Such is the premise of The Seashell – a comedic short by writer Jason K. Allen.

For when twelve-year-old Lauren finds herself on the beach, she picks up her own seashell. And can’t believe what she hears.

It’s not the ocean. It’s a voice. Quite a strange, weird one indeed. The owner of that voice: a tongue-tied chap named Ricky. He’s filling in for Mother Nature, who’s been detained. Ricky claims he’s trying to help… in fact, he says, he’s her son!

Needless to say, an awkward conversation ensues. Reality gets even stranger when Lauren realizes Ricky’s telling the truth. What the heck can one say to the spawn of Mother Nature? Even one as inept as Ricky? So Lauren grills Ricky for details. After all, it’s worth learning how the world works. Mother Nature may be a bitch… but Ricky’s goofy… and quite sweet!

Are you a comedy director in search of something unique? Then give quirky Seashell a good listen. It’s a low budget cast of two, with one setting. We’re sure you’ll like what you hear…

Pages: 6

About the Reviewer: A writer since the age of 12, the first book that Steve Clark ever read was Amityville Horror. The second was Cujo. He’s been writing ever since, and is currently hard at work on two features. He’s reachable at SAClark69 “AT” (or on Long Island, if you’re in the area!!)

About the writer: Jason K. Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, Tennessee. His produced short scripts include AMERICAN SOCK, which won Best Screenplay at the 2014 San Diego Film Awards, and AUTUMN LOVERS, winner of the Audience Award at the 2013 Artlightenment Festival in Nashville. He also wrote the feature film LUCKY FRITZ starring Julia Dietze (IRON SKY) and Corey Feldman. Jason is also a wilderness guide, nature photographer, and published author. See IMDB for his complete credits:





All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.


Sunday, October 4, 2015

Original Script Sunday for October 4th - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are thirty original scripts for your reading pleasure.

– Don

Steven Clark’s short The Combination filmed - posted by Don

Last year Steven Clark’s The Combination spent some time on the discussion boardsA personal tragedy drives a man to repair a damaged bicycle.

Now it moves thanks to Matt Levine.

A husband drowning in grief and guilt and his despondent wife struggle to save their marriage and restore their lives in an unconventional manner, after the loss of their only son.

The Combination Short Film Hi-Def from Matt on Vimeo.

Talk about it on the discussion board.

Saturday, October 3, 2015

Old Time Radio Saturday - posted by Don

Lights Out: Ghost Party – transcript- from: Generic Radio

A séance party gets out of hand when an actual undead creature is summoned.

Information courtesy of Generic Radio

BBC: The Dweller in the Darkness: A Play of the Unknown – transcript- from: The Wireless

A surprisingly solid thriller about six people in a haunted house. Broadcast in April 1925, this is a very early example of a play written especially for radio.

Information courtesy of The Wireless

The Fabulous Dr. Tweedy: The Farmer – transcript- from: Generic Radio

Information courtesy of Generic Radio

The Witch’s Tale: The Altar – transcript- from: Generic Radio

The son of aristocrats takes vengeance on the French Revolutionaries who cost him his parents — and builds an altar of hate.


Information courtesy of Generic Radio

Dragnet – transcript- from: Old Time Radio Researchers Group

Two years’ worth of “Dragnet” scripts

Information courtesy of Old Time Radio Researchers Group

Friday, October 2, 2015

Stone Cold Sober – Optioned! (The Legend of CJ Walley Begins) - posted by wonkavite

Yep, CJ Walley does it again!  STS‘s answer to Quentin Tarantino, with a uniquely feminist Bonnie and Clyde spin, we’re happy to announce that CJ’s just optioned his pensive SF short Stone Cold Sober to director to Joshua Kimbrough (Las Vegas Film Collective).  Fortunately, there’s more where that came from – so give these three unique crime-drama offerings a shot:

Dixie Gash Bandits – When they stop to fix their get-a-way vehicle, two runaway sisters must tackle both love at first sight and the bounty hunters hot on their tail.

Lone Star Runner Hunnies – Fleeing a drug deal gone wrong, four girls held up in a lonely Texas diner face the dilemma of capture vs saving a mortally wounded friend.

Crazy Kitty (review pending) – A group of teens receive a visit from an “old friend”.  But reunions are not always happy things…

About the writer, C.J. WalleyI began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write new specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producers, directors, and actors in LA, NYC, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington DC, Zurich, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Dallas while occasionally blogging for Stage 32.  If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM;

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Red Light – Feature Length Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Red Light

One year after a woman is killed by a red light runner, three teens run the same red light in hopes of seeing her ghost, who they believe is responsible for the recent string of bizarre murders.

Okay, horror fans: think quickly. On your grubby, bloody feet! Here’s a question about our much beloved genre… one you can answer instantly:

What sub-genres of horror are so iconic and classic they warrant separate categories in Netflix? Hmmmm, let’s see…. Zombies? That’s an obvious “no-brainer”… once the ghouls have had their feast. Then there are Possession/Exorcism tales. Alien Abductions. Creature Features. Ghost stories of every scary shape and size.

Then there’s the biggest creep show of them all – a category of horror that deserves it’s own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Folks, I’m a Preaching’ to Y’All about Slashers. Ruminate a moment, and you’ll see.

When you think of memorable horror films, what Big Bads come to mind? Come on kiddies – it’s easy! Michael Meyers. Jason Voorhees. And Freddy Krueger (oh dearest Wes, R.I.P.)

Those are the names of true Boogey Men. Sinister celebrities that stand out from the crowd.

And that’s what makes any horror film a box office blast: the creation of monstrous archetypes with mind-blowing visuals. Ones that burn their details into your mind.

And let’s be honest here. That’s a pool of talent which occasionally must be refreshed. Sure, classic creepy crawlies will always sell *some* tickets. But once the sequels reach #8-10, then it’s time for new faces to emerge. The rush of YOUNG BLOOD… as it were.

Ladies and Gents, STS is proud to present to you just such a thing. It’s a horror Slasher that has “Franchise” written all over it. And won’t leave you yawning “cliché!”

We bring to your attention: Red Light. It’s a creepy blood drenched entry to the horror cannon. With a memorable villain that’ll sear itself into your mind.

Here’s the grim scenario: a lonely, miserable dark night. The location: rural “Old Haven Road” – smack dab in the middle of bum-f*ck nowhere. An old woman – Tabitha Hudson – approaches the intersection, clad in a bright yellow raincoat. The light’s safely red – so she crosses.

Just as a car shoots through the light, ignoring the ruby warning sign. Smack! A hit and run – instantly. Tabitha lies in the gutter. Suffers and dies. Yet the driver of the car keeps going: both a crime…and a tragedy. Even more complex than one can understand.

Fast forward. One year.

Another car blows through the light. Again.

Yet another lonely night. But this time, there’s no victim – just a group of careless teens. Some drunk. Others texting. The irresponsible jerks stop at a diner for a bathroom break, only to meet a horrific fate. An avenging shadowy figure kills all but one of them (Matt) in gruesome ways. Who is it? We don’t know. But the killer wears a battered yellow raincoat. And carries a gore-dripping steel pipe.

Within a day, rumors abound. Especially at nearby Augustus State University… attended by the lamented victims. Stories circulate about the yellow-coated specter of death – and the grisly end that awaits anyone who runs that fearsome light.

Among the concerned students are several bosom buddies: roommates Hannah and Nikki. Their fabulous – and muscular – pal Xander and Hannah’s estranged brother, Jimmy. Taunted by snobby sorority queen Rebecca (Jimmy’s catty ex), the crew run through the Old Haven light on a dare. Sure, they’re a bit nervous. But who cares? The curse can’t be really true. After all, Matt survived the massacre.

That night, Matt meets a nasty end…

Which leaves the teens fearing for their lives. Taking the initiative, Hannah and Nikki begin to investigate the true death of Tabitha Hudson. Who drove the car that killed her? And are supernatural forces in play? Or is the rumor just petty gossip – generated by Rebecca and her bitchy entourage?

The mystery quickly deepens. As does the bloody trail. The clock ticks loudly for Nikki and her friends. Each of them – marked for death.

Needless to say, spoilers need not apply. But rest assured – the characters in this Slasher are in Technicolor 3d. The killer and the deaths? Both memorable. As much as Freddy, we’d say…

But the twists and turns are under wraps. So contact writer Chris Shamburger at cshamburger “AT” live dot com for a copy of the script.

Red Light’s a horror classic in the making. Not to mention a future franchise!

About the writer: Chris Shamburger was a finalist (Top 10) in the 2013 Shriekfest Film Festival for his recently-produced script, Hiccups. He has been a semi-finalist twice and has also been published in Twisted Dreams Magazine and Horror in Words. Chris lives in Marietta, GA with his partner and their Chow-mix rescue, Walter. Aside from writing, Chris has been teaching pre-kindergarten for the past six years. You can find him on IMDb here:




All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Near Dark screenplay - posted by Don

Near Dark – undated, unspecified draft script by Eric Red & Kathryn Bigelow – hosted by: Horror Lair – in pdf format

A mid-western farm boy reluctantly becomes a member of the undead when a girl he meets turns out to be part of a band of southern vampires who roam the highways in stolen cars. Part of his initiation includes a bloody assault on a hick bar.

Information courtesy of

More on the Movie Scripts page.

In Search Of – Guest Reviewers for STS! - posted by wonkavite

In Search Of – Guest Reviewers for STS!

Writers out there, take note! STS (Shootin’ the Shorts) is in search of a few TERRIFIC guest reviewers. After all, readin’ and reviewin’ scripts is hard and sweaty work. We need all the talented help we can get.

What we’re looking for: Seriously good writers that can preferably commit to one review a week. Though if it’s less, we understand and still want to hear from you! (In terms of time involved, we’ve generally found that a review can be written and polished in about one and a half hours, if not less. Depends on one’s writing style.) And regarding that writing style – we encourage reviewers to have their own voice but follow the general STS formula. IE: positive, humorous or poignant reviews that market the script’s best attributes.

What we offer: Well, like most writers, we’re all rolling in the money. (Insert sarcastic eye roll here.) Yes, folks – it’s a volunteer position. Unpaid. But what you gain is two fold – for every script you write, you’ll have space for your own “About the reviewer” logline. And a bit of exposure for your work, in that space. And you also gain writing experience – something to put on your resume, and hone your snappy writing skills until they bleed and shine. And trust us: that’s a very, very good thing.

Anyone interested, please send a shout-out to moderator Wonkavite at janetgoodman “AT” Yahoo.* Feel free to just introduce yourself. Or send a sample of your writing work (in the body of your email, please.)

Spammers need not apply. Seriously. None of us at STS needs a knock-off Armani bag, a mortgage refinance, or six extra inches. At least not the last time we checked…


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