SimplyScripts.Com Logo

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Writer’s Block by John Hunter – Filmed! - posted by Dane Whipple

Writer’s Block (pdf format) by John Hunter – Filmed by Jeff Easley

Billy Wilson would kill for a good story. Will he die for one?

Writer's Block (Short Film) from Jeff Easley on Vimeo.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The Original Review

Words, words, words! For writers, words are life. On a good day, words flow onto the page to create stories that move and inspire us. A well-written story can uplift and…um…hang on, I swear I had something for this. Dang, writing is tough.

Billy Wilson knows all too well the struggle with the blank page. Sitting on a park bench looking for inspiration in a bottle of booze, Billy has a serious case of writer’s block. As Billy ponders just how to come up with a truly unique story, along comes a proverbial spider: Vance Buttons. You see, Vance has a secret to share. He is a serial killer. A well-practiced, calculating, pre-meditated murderer. With half-drunk whimsy, Billy queries for a few specifics. How to choose a victim? Randomly. Geographic preference? Never the same place twice. Just when it seems Billy has found something new to write about, one more problem crops up. He is dealing with a killer after all. Will Vance put Billy out of the misery that is writer’s block, or put him out of his misery altogether? Is Billy writing the story, or is the story writing him?

Feature films dealing with the writing experience pack a potent, powerful punch. Some of film’s truly great screenwriters, from Charlie Kaufman to the Coens, have tackled the subject. AdaptationBarton Fink, and Wonder Boys have all built reputations as favorites among both filmmakers and audiences. In this grand tradition, Writer’s Block succinctly taps into a subject that consistently garners accolades on the festival circuit and beyond. If you are looking for a film with an intelligent build to an unforgettable finale, I recommend you come down with a case of Writer’s Block.

Quickly, before the killer strikes again!

Pages: 4

Budget: Low. Assuming you can find a park bench, that is.

About the writer, John Hunter: With the completion of (4) boffo features, a litter of riveting shorts, a one hour take-your-breath-away sci-fi TV pilot and first 30 minute episode for that series, I am now officially THAT guy — The one who really needs an Agent or Executive Producer. Contact me at x32792 (AT) yahoo.com

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple is the man who fixed the 1919 World Series. How did he manage that? Saw the opportunity, I suppose. He is currently working on that screenplay everybody keeps talking about: The Wild Age. Contact him at dane.whipple (AT) live.com

Read Writer’s Block (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Like a Moth to a Flame – Sold - posted by Pete Barry

Sold

It will be produced and directed by Jeff Easley. Production will begin in early March.

Jeff recently directed John Hunter’s “Writer’s Block” and “The Coffee Maker from Hell” written by Greg Thomson.

Jeff’s IMDb and Vimeo pages.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Like a Moth to a Flame (11 pages, pdf format) by Matias Caruso

A woman attempts to exorcise her lost lover. But is his pull too powerful to wish away?

Love, they say, is a flame. Passionate. Unstoppable. Consuming everything in its wake. That type of love can drive one to irrational, insane acts. Commit unspeakable crimes in its name.

Nadia’s flame is Jack.

Her love for Jack blots out all else. Reason. Proportion. Even reality.

Alone in her dark apartment, Nadia obsesses over the lost love of her life. Though the holes in her memory blot out certain things, other visions refuse to go away. The miserable existence she’s led since he’s been gone. The drastic measures she’s taken to kill the pain. Shopping. Eating. Cutting her arms with razors.

At her wit’s end, Nadia finally summons “Mr. K.” – a mysterious shaman wearing rings made of bone, a man she believes can make the pain go away.

Is it a hallucination? Or black magic? And does that even matter, if the pain itself is real? But can Mr. K. do anything to end Nadia’s suffering; save her from the misery?

A terrifying psychological fantasy ripped from the imagination of master writer Matias Caruso, Like a Moth to the Flame explores multiple dark themes: rationalization, addiction. The void left behind when one’s cut off from the object of their desire.

It’s a low budget masterpiece with frightening visuals. Give Moth a read – it’ll suck you in, and burn your wings.

Budget: Low budget – a cast of two, in a single apartment – lit by the static of a television set. And leave room for a great costumer designer. Mr. K deserves some fashionable threads!

About the writer: An optioned and award winning screenwriter, Matias Caruso has far too many accolades to name. So we’ll stick with just one: he’s the 2014 Grand Prize Winner of the International Page Awards Contest. Not to mention an all-around terrific guy. Interested in Matias’ work? Email him at matiascaruso32 (a) gmail

About the reviewer: Pete Barry is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright, actor, director and musician. His short plays have been published in numerous collections. He’s also a cofounder of the Porch Room, a film and theater production company, website available at http://www.porchroom.com/.  Please feel free to reach out to him with script requests at petebarry27 (a) Hotmail.

Read Like A Moth To The Flame (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Deal of a Lifetime – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Guest Reviewer

Deal of a Lifetime (12 pages in pdf format) by James Barron

Some old cars are hidden treasures… aren’t they?

In today’s world, the adage “If it sounds to good to be true, it probably is” is more relevant than ever. We’ve all received those amusing emails from Nigerian princes and accidentally clicked on those adverts offering us a way to get a beach body in 4 weeks days seconds.

But how many of you have asked for $10,000 for a rusty Corolla worth $400 max… and shockingly find it accepted?

Carl, the proprietor of Carl’s Cars and main character in Deal of a Lifetime, has done just that; successfully offloading the junker to young and apparently street smart Rodrigo.

Carl should be laughing all the way to the bank, right?

Well, he isn’t. You see, before Rodrigo arrived, another man, Gabriel, thought $2,000 was an absolute bargain for that hunk of junk, and left the dealership to get the needed cash.

So when Rodrigo grins with delight at the prospect of forking out $10,000, Carl begins to suspect foul play. Or some sort of scam.

However, he soon learns that his humble Corolla hides a priceless secret within its unappealing exterior. A secret so incredible that the potential buyers are willing to exchange something far more valuable than money for access to the vehicle.

In fact, their very lives…

Featuring a unique concept and amusing – yet thought provoking – dialogue, a Deal of a Lifetime is just what you’ll have on your hands if you scoop this script up, and drive it off the lot!

Budget: Not bad at all. Borrow a junker Corolla, and you’re pretty much set.

About the Writer: James Barron is a former law student turned screenwriter who loves to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller. Check out his work at JBarronScripts.com

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp (a) gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

Read Deal of a Lifetime (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, December 23, 2016

The Gifted Photographer – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by LC

The Gifted Photographer (pdf format) Ian J. Courter

A photographer pays a house-call to shoot a family portrait where his true talent becomes apparent.

Photographs, those treasured mementos of our lives – they can chart a life from birth through to adulthood, and beyond. We keep photos in our wallets, in lockets around our necks, in photo-frames by our bedside tables. Photographs allow us to freeze moments – to travel back in time.

The Gifted Photographer is set towards the end of the Victorian era. At first glance it conjures Great Britain, but America had its own Gilded Age, most notably in the regions of New England and the Deep South. Think Gothic Architecture, the Women’s Suffragette Movement, Republican domination, and literary greats such as Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain. This was also a period characterized by high society and strict morality.

Ian J. Courter manages beautifully to evoke the images of the time – the cobblestone streets, horse drawn carriages and top-hats.

Photography at this time was in its infancy – there was no such thing as the ‘Selfie’ and no such thing as Instagram or Snapchat. The taking of photographs, in particular portraits, was only ever done for special occasions.

The story opens on Michael Houtman, the titular photographer of the piece. Herbert and Margaret Jaffe have requested his services for a very special family portrait with their daughter, Linda. Michael strikes up a conversation with Linda and discovers this sweet young woman suffered a nasty spill on the ice a few months ago. The accident has left her sickly and confined to a wheelchair, but this morning she wakes to a perfect Spring day feeling better than she has in a long time – and she’s ready for her close-up.

But this is no ordinary day, no ordinary photo-shoot, and no ordinary photographer…

Far be it for me to shed too much light, or bring into focus the darker themes and rich cultural history explored in The Gifted Photographer, suffice to say the Latin phrases Ars moriendi and Memento mori both give clues into a not so well known practice explored in this unique tale.

Of course, all you have to do to find out more is read the script. You’ll not only discover the secret talent The Gifted Photographer possesses, but will also uncover the talent of writer Ian J. Courter.  

With an ending that will stay with you long after the lights come up (we recommend reading it at night) and a final sting in the tail you won’t see coming, we advise you to get The Gifted Photographer in the can quick as a flash, before somebody else snaps it up.

Pages: 8

Budget: A little will be needed to make this one period.  But given what you get in the return, it’s definitely worth it!

About the writer: Ian J. Courter has an academic and technical-writing background, and is published in both fields, so a shift to another form of writing seemed natural. He strives to combine his writing skills with nearly two decades of military experience to develop screenplays with vivid locations and in-depth, realistic characters. What started as a hobby quickly became a passion.  In only a few short years, he has written three feature-length screenplays and nine short scripts.  He currently has several feature-length scripts in various stages of development and continually seeks inspiration for more. His email address is ian.j.courter “at” gmail.com.

About the reviewer: L. Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.

Read The Gifted Photographer (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, December 15, 2016

What A Good Boy Does – Short script review, available for production - posted by James Barron

What A Good Boy Does pdf format by Ben Clifford

A young boy feels like he needs to tell his parents about a horrifying thing that happened to him — only to find out that they might not want to know. Trigger warning.

Picture that classic 1950’s image of the perfect American family:

Mother in her apron, steam rising from a fresh batch of brownies.
Father with his dinner jacket and pipe, smiling like he just told a joke.
Son at the table, their pride and joy, what a good little boy.

Now take a match and light it on fire.

This is a story of the cracks and holes and twisted, burnt corners of the nuclear family dream. Mother is a strung-out mess, desperate to keep up appearances. Father is the buttoned-up breadwinner whose well-being trumps all else. And their son, Bobby, has a secret. Something that makes his mother very worried. Something that might just send the whole façade crumbling down. How far will mother go to plaster over the cracks? How deep can one family bury their skeletons?

If you want a safe, happy family drama, check the Hallmark channel. If you’re looking for a psychologically complex tale with the courage and conviction to face those very dark places, you owe it to yourself to check out Ben Clifford’s What A Good Boy Does.

Production: This ten page short is an actor’s film. Suburban neighborhood. Suburban house. Two couples and a child.

About the writer: Ben Clifford is an Australian screenwriter

About the reviewer: James Barron is a former law student turned screenwriter who loves to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller. Check out his work at JBarronScripts.com

Read What A Good Boy Does (10 page short drama in pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, December 9, 2016

North Star – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

North Star (pdf format) by P.J. Palmer

A rancher on a secluded mountain ranch makes life-changing sacrifices to take care of his ailing wife.

Films that explore devastating illnesses fall in and out of favor… and aren’t to every moviegoer’s taste. Are they “entertaining”? No. But best of them (for instance, Still Alice or The Theory of Everything) strike to the heart of what makes drama great. Exposing what it means to be human, and vulnerable. To have one’s life – or a loved one’s – altered by a twist of fate. Stories that deal with such topics may never draw the popcorn crowd, but their impact will persevere – long after the latest blockbuster spectacle fades away.

In his poignant short North Star, writer P.J. Palmer shines a narrative light on a stroke victim’s family. Specifically, on the difficult decisions required of a loving husband… and caregiver.

Steve and his wife Cheryl (50s) live on a secluded mountain ranch. At first glance, Steve’s daily routine seems mundane. He rises before dawn, shaves, dresses – and patters about their bedroom quietly so as not to wake Cheryl. In the kitchen, he fires up the coffee and lights the stove. Then, accompanied by two rambunctious dogs, Steve heads outside to do chores.

Once back, Steve returns to the bedroom and opens the curtains to wake his wife.

…but with daylight come realities. For Cheryl is thin and frail – and completely dependent on Steve for her needs. Bathing, dressing, feeding. Everything. But through his actions, Steve’s dedication to his wife is clear. His love: unconditional.

The situation’s heart-wrenching… and ultimately unsustainable. As their daughter Erin laments: “We all wish it were different. Just gonna do what we have to, to make it through.” But there are some hard decisions ahead – even for the most devoted family.

There’s no sugarcoating North Star’s theme, but its psalm to humanity rings true throughout. Vivid descriptions, and touching moments – contrasted with harsh reality. Are you a drama director in search of a substantial story that resonates? Be assured, you’ve got one here.

Pages: 11

Budget: Relatively low. Only four actors, all of whom have meaty roles. Steve, Cheryl and Eric (and neighbor rancher Mike.) A couple of dogs and a cat are optional. A horse is a necessity – but no riding required.

About the Writer: P.J. Palmer has worked on 20+ short films, web series, music videos, documentary projects and commercials as a director, producer and/or writer. He began his career at Warner Brothers Studio working on the set of the TV series ‘ER’. Palmer is now alumni to the 2013 Edinburgh Film Festival Talent Lab. He was also an artist in residence with 2014 Steinbeck Festival where he premiered his documentary: ‘GRAPES OF WRATH’ (Director / Producer) starring James Franco and Lois Smith. That same year Palmer won the CLIO for best commercial for producing Srixon’s ‘JOURNEY TO BETTER’ broadcast campaign. Palmer’s comedy pilot project ‘SLACKLY MANOR’ (Producer) won the 2013 LA Comedy Script Festival. Recently, Palmer guided the ground-breaking, dramatic web series ‘ANYONE BUT ME’ (Series Producer) through three seasons in NYC to dozens of top industry awards including Best Web Series and Best Drama. His short film “GOOD LUCK” (Director) was picked up for distribution by Fox Digital Studios and accepted into several festivals. Another short film of his, ‘MEMBERS ONLY’ (director) is out to festivals. Previously, in making his first documentary, Palmer was on the ground during the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina as a disaster relief volunteer while filming the documentary ‘AMERICAN RED CROSS: KATRINA RELIEF’ (Co-Director / Producer). Palmer is now in production directing the feature length documentary ‘FOR ED RICKETTS’, exploring the lasting influences of John Steinbeck, Joseph Campbell and Ed Ricketts, set to debut in the spring of 2016. Currently, Palmer is in active development on the Scottish feature script ‘PULL NO PUNCHES’ as his narrative feature directorial debut. IMDB: Portfolio

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on an animated feature.

Read North Star (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, November 28, 2016

Boulangerie – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by LC

Boulangerie (pdf format) by Jose Arana

An abused girl in a French village meets the most unlikeliest hero: a baker.

Babette’s Feast, Big Night, Rataouille, Chocolat, Heartburn.

What do all of these classic movies movies have in common? Food. And their accompanying themes of the power of food – food as seduction, as self indulgence, and that eternal struggle between self denial and sensual gratification. Food is a powerful and primary ingredient in all of our lives to comfort and sustain, but mostly to nourish.

Writer Jose Arana introduces us to Richard Dubois, a man in his late 50s, who knows all about food, specifically that staple – bread. Problem is, he appears to be missing some of that all important nourishment. When we first meet Richard he’s kneading a ball of dough as if his life depends on it. He’s a man in the zone, and, it appears, a man in a considerable amount of emotional pain – working that dough as if to exorcise his demons. What these demons are at this point, we don’t know, but how fitting it is that the French word for ‘bread’ is in fact ‘pain’, and it’s writ large on Richard’s face.

Set in a small Parisian village in a quaint old style bakery – Jose sets the scene so you can almost taste the fluffy white rolls, the sweet brioche, and the buttery croissants – feel the warmth emanating in the room, and smell the freshly baked bread as it comes out of the oven.

But outside a storm’s raging, torrential rain, lightning, thunder – it’s a dirty night and commuters are scurrying home to the warmth and safe haven of their homes and loved ones. Not so, eight year old Madeleine, who suddenly appears on Richard’s doorstep. At first glance Richard fails to recognize her – her face concealed under a hooded rain-coat and looking bedraggled from the wild weather – it takes him a moment to realize she’s a local girl and he quickly invites her inside to get warm and take shelter.

Something’s up, but we don’t know what, and despite the little girl’s protests Richard insists on telephoning Madeleine’s mother to let her know she’s all right. Though he commiserates with Madeleine and is aware of her mother’s reputation for strictness, he is quick to remind her that respecting one’s elders is very important.

But when Madeleine’s mother doesn’t answer the phone… Richard is not happy and the tone shifts.

It’s one clever little girl however who changes the subject and asks Richard about his passion for baking and when Madeleine expresses her interest in taking up the pursuit a bond develops between the two, and not just through a love of bread-making. It’s easy to see Madeleine craves a father figure, also easy to see Richard has a big gap to fill in his life.

Jose Arana weaves a deceptively simple tale With Boulangerie – a balanced and layered dish of bittersweet ingredients with a dash of that secret ingredient – mystery. Through flashback we discover both Richard and Madeleine harbor secrets and that each bears familiar scars, but that in each other they might just find a kindred spirit.

Boulangerie is a gentle and quiet narrative, its subtext and subtle impact felt not only through what is said in dialogue but equally through what is left unsaid. This is a story with much more going on than first meets the eye.

As with all good mysteries, some crucial questions remain unanswered:

What’s an eight year old girl doing out alone and in the middle of a storm? And, what of the suspicious bruises on her arm? Where is Madeleine’s mother, and why doesn’t she answer the phone? Finally, what is the significance of the shattered photo frame – a portrait of Madeleine and her mother, and the flashback to Richard, and his own mother.

Well, you’ll just have to read the script to find out. Will your appetite be sated? Yes, you’ll be full as a goose.

But don’t delay. We recommend you act fast and get first dibs because there’s sure to be a bit of a bun-fight over this one. And, one thing’s for sure, the clever crafting of Boulangerie will definitely leave you wanting more of what Jose Arana has to offer.

Pages: 5

Budget: Reasonable. One location: a bakery and two main rolls (excuse me, “roles.”) It’s a budget that won’t require too much dough. 🙂

About the writer: Jose Arana loves telling stories that are heartwarming and adventurous. With a B.A. in Social Sciences from the University of Southern California and a minor in Cinematic Arts, he enjoys hearing back from how his work leaves an impact in people’s hearts. He loves being of service to others. Contact him at jarana27 “AT” gmail

About the reviewer: L. Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.

Read Boulangerie (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Fabrini – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

Fabrini (pdf format) by Henry Christner

An old hotel elevator operator in Washington, D.C., discovers an alignment of past and present.

Tom Hanks races to the top of the Empire State Building for a fated rendezvous with Meg Ryan in Sleepless in Seattle

Keanu Reeves descends to rescue hostages from the evil Dennis Hopper in Speed

Gene Wilder propels his pure imagination to even greater heights in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

Will Ferrell acts out the ultimate push-button fantasy in Elf

Jennifer Lawrence, Woody Harrelson, and Josh Hutcherson react differently to Jena Malone’s striptease in The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

And in 2010’s Devil… well, never mind.

What do all these movie scenes have in common? An elevator! Ever contemplated inserting an elevator scene into your screenplay? If you haven’t… perhaps you should. It’s a detail so vital to the Die Hard franchise that elevator scenes were included in all five movies. Yippee-ki-yay! As Bruce Willis might say…

And in the short script Fabrini, an elevator proves the perfect stage. The protagonist: 74-year-old Joe Fabrini; longtime elevator operator at the Doyle Hotel in D.C. A man at peace with his place in life, Joe’s almost a part of the hotel himself. Attired in a “burgundy whipcord suit and gendarme cap,” Fabrini is a fixture of a bygone era – eagerly regaling riders with stories of famous people who have stayed at the hotel. Though he clearly relishes the spotlight, he’s also quick to point out, “I see a lot of things. But I see nothing.”

When the story opens, Fabrini has the rapt attention of a couple as he describes a brief encounter with Jackie Kennedy. As the couple exits, Joe’s in midstory of yet another tale… regarding old-time screen actress Ida Lupino. Fabrini takes the interruption in stride, welcoming aboard two new riders: the elegant 66-year-old Miss Carlson and her son, Paul. Miss Carlson visited the Doyle once before. A long, long time ago.

Fabrini immediately engages the two in repartee – it turns out Miss Carlson likes Lupino too! Fabrini and Carlson share fond memories of the Doyle Hotel’s ballroom, that “wonderfully romantic place in the old days.” Which is when young Paul reveals, “It’s the reason we’re here.” The question is – what exactly does that mean?

A vivid story-within-a-story, Fabrini is a touching tale filled with sweetness and nostalgia. For a smart and sensitive director, this ride is well worth taking…

Pages: 7

Budget: Minimal. A handful of characters. Dress Joe Fabrini appropriately to add flair. Getting permission to commandeer an elevator should be easy. Plus, do yourself a favor — Google “Ida Lupino.” 🙂

About the Writer: Henry Christner, a former teacher and newspaperman, is a relative newcomer to screenwriting. He is the author of one feature, “Let Me Die in My Footsteps,” and three shorts — “Conversion,” “Hagridden,” and “Fabrini.” He can be reached at Hdchristner (a) yahoo!

Read Fabrini (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Scooter – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

Scooter (pdf format) by Libby Chambers

In the Suburbs of Sydney in the 70s, an adolescent girl longs for a scooter…or at least she thinks she does.

Remember when you were 12? We all do – no matter how long ago it was. No responsibilities and no worries. The realities of life left to the adults. Looking back, that childhood naïveté and innocence was pretty close to bliss. Even if we didn’t know it, at the time.

Indulging in a bit of nostalgia is comforting. And therein lies the appeal of Scooter. It’s the 1970s. The setting? Sydney, Australia – a sunny day. 12 year old Lizzie lounges outside with older sister, Nina. They’re watching a group of exuberant 14 year old boys race scooters down a hill. And Lizzie’s getting jealous.

“The boys fly down the hill at breakneck speed, whooping as they go.” Lizzie’s positively “transfixed.” Christmas is coming soon, and Lizzie wonders if Mum and Dad might buy her a scooter of her own. In bed that night, she shares those thoughts with Nina. But Nina discourages her, telling Liz she overheard their parents discussing Dad’s job. Asking for a scooter “isn’t a good idea.” Money’s kind of tight right now.

And with those simple words, Lizzie’s dreams are dashed to the floor.

Remember Christmas when you were a kid? Waiting with bated breath to see what morning would bring… and if it would be as magical as you hoped for? Lizzie’s about to go through that turmoil, too. But will she get what she really, truly wants?

A sweet sentimental script, Scooter is reminiscent of many classics. Stand By Me, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, and Moonrise Kingdom. Like those eternal standards, Scooter brings to mind that long-lost time – when life was simple, and the biggest concern on every child’s mind was yearning for that special present.

Are you a director or producer looking for Christmas to come early? Scooter would make a terrific gift!

Pages: 11

Budget: Low. Two girls, a few rambunctious teenage boys, and a hill. Simple interior shots in a house. Add BYOS (Bring Your Own Scooters) and some Christmas decor for a fun trip down memory lane!

About the Writer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She has also worked professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She is thrilled her first ever entry (Simpatico) into a Screenplay Comp – The LA Comedy Festival ‘Short’ screenplay division took out Top 3 Finalist and hopes the high placing will be a continuing trend. 🙂 Libby would love to see her words come to life on screen. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is still working hard on her animated feature.

Read Scooter (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Search with Google

    Custom Search SimplyScripts

One Week Challenge

SimplyScripts Newsletter

    Subscribe to the SimplyScripts mailing list

    * indicates required


    Help Forever Red get made! Got no coin? Don't sweat it, comrade. You can still help by following the campaign on Seed and Spark!

Award Season Screenplays - New!

Featured SimplyScripts Blogs

ScriptSearch

Advertisement

More Navigation

Great Vocab

Latest Entries

Categories

Script of the Day
October 22, 2017

    Meeting The Other Woman by David Lambertson (eldave1) writing as Anonymous

    A wife discovers something important about her own life when she finally meets the other woman. 12 pages
    Discuss it on the Forum

    *Randomizer code provided by Cornetto.

Advertisement

Donate


Advertisement



Writers I dig

Search Amazon

Search Sheet Music




SimplyScripts Logo