SimplyScripts.Com Logo

Friday, November 25, 2016

The Final Level – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

The Final Level (pdf format) by Jeff Bush

Two warriors fight for their survival in a wicked game with deadly adversaries.

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock throughout 2015, you’re aware that Sci-Fi is really a big thing. As of July 1st, Jurassic World’s grossed $520 million in the US alone. And newcomer Terminator: Genisys is up to $17M worldwide. Each a blockbuster in its own right; which is surely no surprise. ‘Cause who doesn’t love an adrenalin-pumping monster or robot flick… especially in these summer days?

Which is exactly the appeal of Jeff Bush’s riveting short, The Final Level. It’s a simple concept with non-stop action… limited location, but wild FX.

The protagonists: Gladiators Ayreon and Olzon – clad in leather armor and armed with plasma shooting guns. They’re trapped in a room and fighting to the death… creatures attacking on all sides.

What creatures you ask? Well, they’re something called the “Myygen” – “arachnid in appearance, with twitching, dripping whip like tails.” The Myygen come in different sizes (all equally lethal, of course.) They shoot a “moist, sticky web” of slime at their human targets – loaded with venom that burns. Poisons. And kills.

As their ammunition dwindles, Ayreon and Olzon retreat to a lift – one that promises them swift ascent to freedom. But as elevator engines start to rumble, the Myygens attack with a vengeance – blocking off the valiant warriors’ escape.

Why are Ayreon and Olzon there? Can they survive the onslaught? And if they do – what horrors await them just above?

Needless to say, this is one script that requires FX/CGI. But in these days of affordable tech and software – that’s far from an unreachable dream. Look at Cloverfield and District Nine – two films that proved that wild FX can be done effectively… and relatively cheap. If you’re a director that aspires to work in the SF field, grab Final Level and run with it. It could be your passport to even greater things!

Pages: 8

Budget: A small challenge, but imagine the fun with FX/CGI. Two lead testosterone-fueled actors, a female with a distinctive voice for voiceover work, plus a few extras.

About the Writer: A veteran writer with almost a decade of experience, Jeff Bush has written 15 shorts, and 2 features – with 3 more in the works. Partnered with writer Shawn Davis, Jeff has another film due to be optioned by Nancy Glass Productions/MTV, and a cowritten feature due for production in August, with release towards the end of 2015. A stickler for details and format, Jeff’s tastes run toward the horror/thriller genre… almost always with an R rating! Reach out to him at dreamscale (a) cox.net.

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on an animated feature.

Read The Final Level (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Trapped – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Pete Barry

Trapped* (pdf format) by Chris Keaton

Searching for a bit of the past, a survivor of an apocalypse finds himself trapped.

Spoiler alert: you’re going to die.

It could be quick – a sneaky brain aneurysm that shuts you off like a light switch. Or maybe it’ll be the slow torture of terminal illness. Or a sudden, tragic accident. But whatever the fates hold in store, you’ll have to face it. Eventually. That’s one of the reasons horror is such a beloved genre. It’s our morbid fascination of watching the human animal in its death throes… and wondering how we ourselves will fare.

Written by talented screenwriter Chris Keaton, Trapped is just such a tale. Bleak. Grim. Depressing. And you won’t be able to turn your eyes away.

In the indeterminate future, society’s collapsed. Dave’s been struggling to survive ever since. Wandering through desolate terrain. Scavaging. Surviving by any means necessary. Which has worked… at least, until now. In a lightening quick moment of lousy luck, he finds himself trapped in an abandoned garage; pinned under an engine block at the bottom of a pit. Unless a miracle happens, Dave’s reached The End.

There’s no chance of medical care. Wild dogs prowl outside. And he hasn’t seen another human being in months. But when a small group of travelers discover Dave’s predicament, it looks like he might be saved! But is it the help he was praying for? Or something else entirely?

Much like The Walking Dead (and other post-apocalyptic tales), Trapped is framed against the death of society. But the story itself is far more personal. Surprisingly uplifting in certain ways, it’s about facing your own mortality. And appreciating the small joys of life… while you can.

Horror and thriller indie directors take note: the potential for great performances in this one is vast. A small cast – no FX. All that’s needed is someone with the vision to bring it to screen. Grab this little gem while you can.

Or you can ignore it. It’s your funeral.

Pages: 7

Budget: Mid-range. Set in an automotive garage, there are a few “equipment” requirements. But nothing that would break the bank. (Especially if you’re pals with a local mechanic!)

About the writer: Chris Keaton is an Air Force veteran living with his family in sunny Arizona. He’s primarily a screenwriter, but he does love diving into prose. He has had several short screenplays produced and go on to win awards. He’s optioned a few features screenplays and currently has a thriller feature in post-production. A young-adult novel based on one of his screenplays is soon to be released. You can see some of his projects on his website, Chris-Keaton.com or follow him on Facebook at Facebook.com/ChrisKeaton.

About the reviewer: Pete Barry is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright, actor, director and musician. His short plays have been published in numerous collections. He’s also a cofounder of the Porch Room, a film and theater production company, website available at http://www.porchroom.com/. Please feel free to reach out to him with script requests at petebarry27 (a) Hotmail.

Read Trapped* (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

*Fixed the broken link

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Dog Years – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by David M Troop

Dog Years
The barrier guards at the Large Hadron Collider make a strange discovery that makes them stop and wonder… just for a moment.

I never understood the whole “take your dog shopping with you” thing. Especially since most stores and restaurants don’t allow pets inside. (What’s wrong with places like that, anyway? The presence of dogs makes everything better, you ask me.)

“Hey, Sparky, let me take you from the comfy air conditioned house and lock you inside the sweltering Ford death box. That way, you can watch me eat a foot long tuna sub through the window at Subway. Doesn’t that sound like lotsa fun?”

In fact, whenever I see a dog alone in a parked car, I prefer to imagine he had an argument with his owner, stole the keys, and drove himself there. Maybe he gnawed on a bone until it calmed him down, then drove back home to wag his tail and apologize.

Highly doubtful, I realize, but it makes me feel better than the alternative.

By now, you’re probably wondering how this all ties in with the new short script Dog Years, by super scribe Anthony Cawood.

It does. Trust me. Because maybe there are MORE explanations for such things than meets the eye.

Pascal and Antoine are two security guards at the Hadron Collider, who stumble upon a dog locked inside a car. Pascal thinks it’s weird the car’s been there all day, but Antoine dismisses it as “just someone’s pet.”

Pascal just might let it go at that, if it weren’t for “the sign.” Attached to the dog’s collar, it actually reads FROM THE FUTURE. Explain that one, smart guy.

Still, Antoine blows it off as a practical joke. Or maybe it’s one of those hidden camera reality shows. Still – ultimately – it’s just a dog.

So a defeated Pascal mopes back to the guard’s station.

I won’t expose the ending, but what happens next is a bit – extreme.

A fun quirky script, Dog Years will make you chuckle (and think twice) the next time you see a poodle sitting behind the wheel of that rusty mini van in the Walmart parking lot.

Comedy directors – especially those with a fondness of dogs (and security guards) – should scoot across the lawn, and lap this script up. Quickly!

Pages: 4

Budget: Low. A small cast of only three, and one of them will literally work for kibble. As for the Hadron Collider?  Stock footage can be subbed in. Or just another sign!

Disclaimer: The reviewer wishes to express that no animals were harmed during the writing of this review.

About the Reviewer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, and this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

About the Writer, Anthony Cawood: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Read Dog Years

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Fault – Short Script for Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Guest Reviewer

Fault
Technology can solve most ills – except when social conditioning plays a part….

Over the past few decades, treatment of mental health has improved leaps and bounds. Today, we’re revolted at how the mentally unwell were whisked away to asylums and had experiments forced on them – like cogs in the pharmaceutical machine.

Of course, problems still exist today. Especially when it comes to children; many of whom suffer from agonizing emotional distress – yet are far too scared to face the truth.

Steven Clark’s Fault tackles this tricky topic with respect. On page 1, we’re introduced to a seemingly typical teenage situation: young Mary Kate is holed up in her room – doing nothing, saying nothing, and refusing everything offered by her father, David. It’s a common condition – for any age.

But what isn’t common is the “cure”. After having her brain scanned thoroughly, Mary Kate’s doctor installs a small chip in her arm. The teen seems deeply nervous, but her mother Abby’s desperate to have the procedure done.

After the implant’s complete, the doctor pulls Abby aside for a word of warning. The chip treatment can sometimes be – let’s say – “too perfect” for its own good. But Abby’s mother is convinced. If anything will save her Mary Kate, this technology is the way.

And technology doesn’t make mistakes – right?

Will the treatment worked as intended? Or will there be a tragic glitch – sending an already troubled family down a darker path? With these answers come profound insights: regarding how society views troubled children. Not to mention, how they view themselves.

A short script that discusses big, unsettling ideas head on, Fault will shine bright with the right actors. Pair candid, raw performances with a skilled director – and the result will be troubling. But faultless, nonetheless.

Pages: 8

Budget: Relatively low. One doctor’s office, one house – that’s it.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Based in upstate, NY, Steven Clark is the writer of over 30 short scripts, several of which are under option, in pre-production, or have already been made into films. On A Clear Night, a family Christmas feature aimed at a Hallmark Channel-type audience, is currently in the works. Steven can be reached at Steamroller138 (a) gmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, July 15, 2016

Noob – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Noob
An alien-made artificial intelligence faces its greatest challenge: teaching a cantankerous, technology-averse 80-year old human how to work an iPhone.

Old people vs technology: it’s a perennial battle of the ages. And as technology gets more and more advanced, it ain’t gonna get easier any time soon!

Which doesn’t mean one can’t have multiple laughs at its expense…

That’s exactly what James Barron’s satirical Noob aims to do. Lead character Henry’s a grizzled war vet – the kind of guy who thinks physical prowess proves a man’s worth. So when his daughter buys him an iPhone, he struggles to understand the basics – and we mean really “basic”… like turning it on.

Frustrated by failure, the old man’s grief is multiplied when his wife suggests getting help from experts. But Henry’s determined to lone wolf this operation. At first, that doesn’t seem like such a bad idea – Henry calls the correct number for his queries. But then he accidentally changes the language to Spanish. Qué desastre!

Already confused, Henry’s utterly baffled when the weather suddenly changes and a large metallic craft appears. He’s being abducted! So it seems.

As it turns out, his abductor is a computer sent by a technologically advanced species to observe human behaviour for academic reasons – and poses no danger to Henry’s health.

But Henry poses a great threat to the computer…

…because he thinks it’s the Apple support system! And while he didn’t know how to work an iPhone, he certainly doesn’t understand the requests the AI makes – leading to a massive series of escalating communication breakdowns.

Threatening the poor bot’s circuit-sanity.

Hilariously ironic with a brilliant payoff, Noob is a clever commentary of the universal love-hate relationship we have with technology. It’s guaranteed to have everyone laughing – with or without the Genius Bar!

Pages: 11

Budget: Okay, there’s a bit of FX called for here. But nothing a touch of post or CGI can’t handle.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Newly discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Cassandra – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Cassandra
A young woman hires a company that claims it can show her future with her boyfriend. But when she discovers a future infidelity, she must decide whether to let the visions dictate her choices in the present.

Cassandra: a tragic figure in Greek mythology who had the ability to foresee future dangers, but as she was cursed, no-one believed her warnings. The term “Cassandra complex” comes from this tale and is still a popular idiom today.

George Ding’s Cassandra takes this myth and spins it into an enthralling piece of dramatic sci-fi. Greece is replaced with near-future Bejing, and Cassandra the prophet is now Cassandra the corporation, offering young couples a glimpse of how their romance will likely unfold. And our lead characters are no heroes, but Xiaoyu and Yi, two people in Cassandra’s target demographic.

Like so many lovers, this duo don’t know if they’re ready to tie the knot and become one. But Amy, Xiaoyu’s dear friend and a newlywed, proclaims that Cassandra erased all her doubts about her boyfriend. In fact, Amy’s such a friend that she wants the same thing to happen to Xiaoyu and Yi.

So Xiaoyu gets booked in for an appointment with Cassandra by Amy. But that’s where the similarities end. Her glimpse doesn’t erase her doubts, it expands them. Worse still, the doubts are self-inflicted; her future behaviour sows the seeds for them, not Yi’s. And while she hints at what she sees to Yi, he doesn’t believe she’d do such a thing…or will she?

Will Xiaoyu accept Cassandra’s caution as the inevitable truth, or will she try to alter the course of the future through her actions in the present?

By combining an ancient legend with a futuristic yet believable setting, Cassandra provides a vision not just for couples, but for budding directors too. It predicts many award wins, but be quick – blink and this glimpse will end up belonging to someone else!

Pages: 22

Budget: Moderate. A few different scenes and settings – but despite this being SF, there’s no need for crazy FX!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: George Ding was born in Beijing and moved to the lush, yuppie suburbs of Washington D.C. at the age of four. He received a B.A. in Film Production with a minor in East Asian Languages and Cultures from the University of Southern California. After graduation, George took a two-month trip to Beijing and has lived there ever since.

He currently works as a freelance writer and filmmaker. His writing has appeared in VICEThe New York Times and The Washington Post.

Want to see more? Of course you do! Visit George at http://georgeding.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

It’s A… Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Guest Reviewer

It’s A…

Life Goes On – Even When the World’s Reached Its End

Man, the apocalypse is rough. For the X-Men – and everyone.

Especially if you’re pregnant. Never getting to see your child run, play, live… that’s hard news to swallow with little notice. Let alone fully accept.

This is the exact dilemma Anne and Sarah face in Anthony Cawood’s wrenching drama, It’s A…

Anne’s pregnant and about to pop. Sarah’s expecting too – though not so far along.

The news breaks while they’re in a hospital: the meteor is on its way, and there’s nothing anyone can do to stop it. Needless to say, Sarah and Anne find themselves powerless. And alone.
What do they say? What do they do?

How to accept that everything’s ending… demolishing their cherished plans…

Whiling away the time, Anne asks Sarah questions about the future they both know won’t come.

Things like: Did you want your baby to be a boy? A girl? A dancer? A singer? At first, Sarah is reluctant to answer. She never thought about the gender – she just wanted her child to be healthy. A dream that’s now turned into a nightmare.

Refusing to lay down and die, Anne promises Sarah they can find out the sex of the baby together – one last moment of joy before the end.

A rare contained apocalypse story, It’s A... is brimming with emotions; perfect for two up-and-coming actresses and a director looking to show what talent and drama they have inside.

Remember, the world doesn’t have to end with a whimper. Maybe just a lie.

Pages: 4

Budget: Low. Two actresses, one setting and few props. You might need some old news footage, but a clever director could stage that him/herself.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts “AT” gmail and follow Mitch at twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Read READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

James Barron’s Narrator – Optioned! - posted by wonkavite

Okay folks – time to band together for a hearty congratulations to writer James Barron. His seriously satiric and stand-out comedy short, Narrator, has been officially optioned to Alexander D. Holland of Kemosabe Films.

And trust us – that’s just the beginning. James has far more work available – some of which has already aired on STS. And some of which is pending. Soon, my little precious, soon…

So before you miss the bandwagon, we recommend you grab one of these…

Avoidance — A socially anxious man goes to epic lengths to avoid having a conversation with an old acquaintance. STS Review here!

Grammar Nazi Killer — Three social media obsessed teenagers learn that grammatical errors and poor spelling can have deadly consequences.

Hair — A family man trying to keep his life from falling apart becomes obsessed with impending baldness.

Noob — A highly evolved, alien-made artificial intelligence system tries to teach a cantankerous 80-year old human how to work an iPhone.

Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse – Life after the zombie apocalypse is harsh and uncompromising. But for two stoners holed up in an apartment with a lifetime supply of weed, it’s more like an inconvenience. STS Review here!

Course Listing Unavailable – An ambitious student signs up for an internship program promising real world, hands-on experience. Who knew bloodthirsty demons would be involved? STS Review Here!

About the writer: James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail. We suggest you do so – quick!

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

C.A.R.L. – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

C.A.R.L.

An elderly man needs someone to watch over him. The caregiver that comes to his door is not exactly what he had in mind.

There’s nothing like the companionship of a dog. Loyal and affectionate, dogs are furry bundles of love that come in all shapes and sizes: both in real life and on-screen. Benji. Hooch. Old Yeller. Marley and Me. Rin Tin Tin. And speaking of German Shepherds, a rather special one features in C.A.R.L.:

At eighty years old, cantankerous Frank has seen better days. Following his last hospitalization, Frank’s son puts it on the line. He’s going to need a live-in assistant. It’s either that, or the home. A few days later, a German Shepherd arrives on Frank’s doorstep. Alone. He introduces himself as C.A.R.L., and walks inside. Yes, you read that right. A talking dog.

You see, C.A.R.L.’s not your average canine. He’s a Complex Artificial Realistic Lifeform. Top of the line AI, wrapped in fur. Despite the gadgetry, Frank’s not thrilled. His frustration increases as C.A.R.L. follows him around the house, shooting down each of his objections (and following him into the bathroom.) He doesn’t need walkies. Or food. Give him access to the toilet bowl, and he’s fine. Frank resists – he doesn’t need a nursemaid! But those soulful eyes stare back at him. Will Frank give in to the inevitable, and find a true companion after all?

Though it has a science fiction element, C.A.R.L. is really comedic drama: a short script depicting the meeting of two new best friends…

About the writer: Tim Westland, co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, received first place for Balls Out in the NNYM 15 page contest. A moderator at Moviepoet, he’s an outstanding writer with an eye for the details. His IMDB page can be found here.

Pages: 6

Budget: Really depends on how you tackle this one. There’s no reason C.A.R.L.’s speech can’t be handled with voiceover – making the only requirement a well trained German Shepherd. (Which describes all GSDs, doesn’t it?) 🙂

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Search with Google

    Custom Search SimplyScripts

Award Season Screenplays - New!

Great Vocab

Subscribe to the SimplyScripts mailing list

    Email Address

Featured SimplyScripts Blogs

ScriptSearch

Advertisement

More Navigation

Latest Entries

Categories

Script of the Day
January 17, 2018

Advertisement

Donate


Advertisement



Writers I dig

Search Amazon

Search Sheet Music




SimplyScripts Logo