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Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Phil and the Kettle filmed! as The Coffee Maker from Hell - posted by Don

Phil and the Kettle (11 pages in PDF format) by Greg Thomson filmed as The Coffee Maker from Hell

A man is terrorized by his sadistic kettle (Short, Comedy)

The Coffee Maker from Hell from Jeasley on Vimeo.

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The Skinny Samaritan – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Guest Reviewer

The Skinny Samaritan
After a local hero is released from the hospital for being on a hunger strike, people at a nearby bus stop discuss the events that made him a legend, and possibly a martyr.

Though they claim to unite us, titans of politics and civil rights movements divide opinion regularly.

From Christ to Churchill to Clinton, public figures who preach their values and views often stir up as much conflict as they aim to quell.

In Mark Lyon’s The Skinny Samaritan, Kenneth – the titular character – may not be running for commander in chief or world savior. But his recent release from a hospital provokes heated debate among commuters, anyway.

You see, Kenneth’s earned his nickname by going on a hunger strike. As far as his motivation goes, not everyone thinks he’s justified.

He should be punished, exclaims Rosalie. He should be praised, retorts Greg. As these two bus stop regulars bicker, Jarvis – the new guy in town – asks “what’s up with Kenneth?”

Boy – did he step in it with that one!

What exactly is Kenneth’s cause? What has he done to nudge it along? And which “side” is more sympathetic in your eyes? You’ll have to read The Skinny Samaritan yourself (and ponder the question) to decide.

No matter one’s political leanings, one constant remains true: audiences hunger for films that make them think. If you’re a director that craves intelligent drama, Samaritan’s a tasty offering. One you shouldn’t push away.

Pages: 11

Budget: Pretty low – all that’s needed is a decent cast, and a bus.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Mark Lyons Mark Lyons is a four-time award-winning screenwriter from Youngstown, Ohio. He’s written several scripts, including ‘The Ephesian’, which won Best Drama at the 2015 Austin Revolution Film Festival (which also garnered him a Best Screenplay nomination), and was selected Best Drama for the Cinema Constant 2015. He also penned Best Film award-winner “God’s Empty Acre”, which was filmed as ‘Girl(s)’ at the 2013 Winter Shorts Film Festival and Best Drama at the 2013 World Independent Film Expo. He was also nominated for a Best Screenplay award at the 2016 Action on Film Festival. Currently, Mark is teaming with writer Sharon Day and producer Justin Colon to co-produce the feature film ‘The Hay Men’, set to film in Summer, 2018. He can be reached at markielyons1107 (a) gmail

Read The Skinny Samaritan

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Hannah – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Hannah
When a woman arrives at a domestic violence shelter,
she and her daughter must confront their twisted past.

There’s something very wrong with Hannah.

… But I’ll let you discover just what that is yourself as you read this horror chiller, penned by Brothers Grimm, David and John Beran.

As with most “fairytales”, the violence in Hannah starts immediately, with mom Violet assaulted by her ex. Barely escaping from Joe with her life, Violet flees to the steps of Leland House (a woman’s shelter), with young daughter Hannah in tow.

It’s not the first time they’ve been there. But Violet’s determined it’ll be the last. As she settles in and figures out her family’s next move, Violet sends Hannah off to play with other children. But Hannah’s definition of play is… let’s say – Strange.

Havoc and horror rain down on a number of Leland residents, quick. To the point that Violet and Hannah are told to leave; this time for good.

For better or worse, they might be checking out anyway. Especially after Joe discovers where they’ve been hiding, and breaks in to extract revenge.

A slow-burn horror with a nasty twist, Hannah would make the perfect short for horror conventions, or Halloween. But whatever you do or go – make sure you don’t read this one in the dark!

Pages: 24

Budget: Medium to high. Several locations (a Laundromat and a shelter – both interior and exterior sets). Several characters with speaking roles and a small makeup/effects budget for some of the gruesome imagery.

About the Reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the Writers: Brothers David and John Beran have optioned three feature screenplays together and separately David won Shriekfest’s Best Horror Feature Screenplay award for “Nevermore.” John’s script “The Secret Song” was named as a quarterfinalist in Francis Ford Coppola’s American Zoetrope contest and the PAGE International Screenwriting Awards.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Saturday, August 13, 2016

The Scripts of the August 2016 One Week Challenge - posted by Don

Wherein writers, on very short notice, were told they had one week to write a ten page screenplay based upon the theme of Trapped in a Cab (could be a car for hire, e.g., Lyft, Uber, Limo, or Tuk-tuck.

Check them out!

Friday, August 12, 2016

Always Bad – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Always Bad

A woman searches for her missing daughter… with a child predator on the loose.

Where is my child?

It’s a question – THE question – that no parent ever wants to have to ask themselves. Almost daily, parents lose track of a child for a few seconds. In those moments, your throat parches worse than the Sahara, the world spins like a Kaleidoscope, and the muscles in the back of your neck pull piano-wire taut. If you’re a parent, you’re familiar with the sinking feeling: the last fleeting microseconds before falling into the pit of pure panic.

Zach Jansen’s Always Bad evokes those distressing sensations… seen through the eyes of Mary, a single mother whose young daughter is lured away from home by a mysterious stranger known only as “Kevin.”

As the script opens, an exhausted Mary washes dishes in the sink – keeping one eye on her daughter Anna Beth, playing with dolls just outside. A lot can be read from the weariness in Mary’s eyes. There’s a darkness somewhere in her past. An evil that just won’t go away.

As Mary focuses on her chores, Kevin emerges from a wooded area nearby. A soft spoken man in nice clothes… clearly out of place. A Wolf in Grandmother’s clothing. Stranger Danger personified. Engaging Anna Bell in casual conversation, he asks her to help him find something he lost… and leads the unsuspecting girl away.

Mary looks up. Anna Beth’s gone. A parent’s worse nightmare!

Rushing outside, a terrified Mary searches the neighborhood – fearing she may already be too late.

One of the cardinal rules of film-making is to “show it, don’t tell it.” Words may be powerful… but visuals – when done properly – are mightier. And so it is with Always Bad, a story driven more by emotion than dialogue. Though he speaks little, Kevin’s character shines through before his third line of dialogue. And Mary? Well, her actions speak louder than words. Actors crave characters like these – as will your audience. With the right casting, Always Bad is one drama that speaks to the most primal of a viewer’s fears. For parents, anyway.

About the Writer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota.  He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script.  If for some reason you want to learn more about him – which of course you DO! – you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog. He can be reached at Zach.Jansen “AT” mail.com

Pages: 5

Budget: Low-to-No Budget: only three characters, and two settings (an apartment and a yard outside.)

About the Reviewer: Rod Thompson currently serves on Active Duty in the United States Navy, with fifteen years of honorable service. In the past ten years he has written numerous award-winning short scripts, with five (or so) having been produced. He recently won Best Drama in 2014’s “Table Read My Screenplay” feature length contest.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Warmer – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Warmer
A curious toy designer picks a poor time to put his latest creation to the test

Dolls. Made as innocent friends to play with imaginary children, the typical fictional doll trope subverts this by adding a sinister, often fatal side to them. From Child’s Play to the evil Krusty in The Simpsons, dolls in fiction invariably are associated with horror.

However, there’s no “horror” in Steve Miles’ Warmer, at least from the audience’s perspective. There are no rogue dolls – just Heidi and Abby, twin blonde and brunette Barbiesque inventions by high-flying toy developer Chuck Dunker. Optimistic about his latest prototype(s), he’s ready to pitch them to the CEO of Morton’s Toys.

But just before the crucial dinner/demonstration, disaster strikes. An “accident” leads to Heidi’s head disappearing. Even worse, Heidi and Abby are an interactive hide and seek playing duo – without one, both are useless!

So the dinner/demonstration turns into dinner/description, without Heidi’s presence. Even so, when the daughter of Morton’s CEO brings out an Abby prototype and turns it on, Chuck starts acting awkwardly. Why?

Because Abby’s quest to find Heidi appears to be focused on Chuck – she won’t take her eyes off him!

Worse still, when Abby gets closer to Chuck, Heidi’s silence is broken, very much to Chuck’s discomfort…

HEIDI DOLL (O.S.)
(muffled)
You’re getting warmer!

Where’s Heidi hiding? And why is Chuck so anxious? Read the script and find out – the reveal of Heidi’s hiding place will warm up even the coldest of hearts in amusement!

Pages: 9

Budget: Moderate. Though you know – getting attractive dolls is key!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Steve Miles decided to get serious about writing around three years ago. Since then he’s concentrated on putting together a collection of shorts with a goal of finishing up a feature or two by year-end. Oh, and giving George RR Martin a run for his money! Email him at stevemiles80 “AT” yahoo.co.uk

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Dog Years – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by David M Troop

Dog Years
The barrier guards at the Large Hadron Collider make a strange discovery that makes them stop and wonder… just for a moment.

I never understood the whole “take your dog shopping with you” thing. Especially since most stores and restaurants don’t allow pets inside. (What’s wrong with places like that, anyway? The presence of dogs makes everything better, you ask me.)

“Hey, Sparky, let me take you from the comfy air conditioned house and lock you inside the sweltering Ford death box. That way, you can watch me eat a foot long tuna sub through the window at Subway. Doesn’t that sound like lotsa fun?”

In fact, whenever I see a dog alone in a parked car, I prefer to imagine he had an argument with his owner, stole the keys, and drove himself there. Maybe he gnawed on a bone until it calmed him down, then drove back home to wag his tail and apologize.

Highly doubtful, I realize, but it makes me feel better than the alternative.

By now, you’re probably wondering how this all ties in with the new short script Dog Years, by super scribe Anthony Cawood.

It does. Trust me. Because maybe there are MORE explanations for such things than meets the eye.

Pascal and Antoine are two security guards at the Hadron Collider, who stumble upon a dog locked inside a car. Pascal thinks it’s weird the car’s been there all day, but Antoine dismisses it as “just someone’s pet.”

Pascal just might let it go at that, if it weren’t for “the sign.” Attached to the dog’s collar, it actually reads FROM THE FUTURE. Explain that one, smart guy.

Still, Antoine blows it off as a practical joke. Or maybe it’s one of those hidden camera reality shows. Still – ultimately – it’s just a dog.

So a defeated Pascal mopes back to the guard’s station.

I won’t expose the ending, but what happens next is a bit – extreme.

A fun quirky script, Dog Years will make you chuckle (and think twice) the next time you see a poodle sitting behind the wheel of that rusty mini van in the Walmart parking lot.

Comedy directors – especially those with a fondness of dogs (and security guards) – should scoot across the lawn, and lap this script up. Quickly!

Pages: 4

Budget: Low. A small cast of only three, and one of them will literally work for kibble. As for the Hadron Collider?  Stock footage can be subbed in. Or just another sign!

Disclaimer: The reviewer wishes to express that no animals were harmed during the writing of this review.

About the Reviewer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, and this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

About the Writer, Anthony Cawood: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Read Dog Years

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, August 8, 2016

SpaceCats in Space! And now for something completely different. - posted by Don

Every once in a while I post something unrelated to screenwriting, but yet still related to story telling and thus posting it to the site. Sometimes its graphic novels (comic books) and sometimes it gaming. This is one of those gaming times. And, I introduce to you:

I had the opportunity to meet Alex Lau, Lead Programmer and CEO of Robtic Potato an indie game studio, and Rachel Lewis, Animation Director of the SpaceCats in Space! project. SpaceCats in Space! intriqued me. I love cats and I have dropped many thousands of American dollars, one quarter at a time, into hundreds of top down shooters beginning with one of the original top down shooters Atari’s Asteroids. I was utterly captivated by SpaceCats in Space! It’s a top down shooter with an engaging story line.

SpaceCats in Space! is an animated twin-stick shooter feline epic that takes place among the stars. The Kingdom of Meowfyre is under attack, and it needs your help right meow! Play as Princess Angelina Contessa III, and blast your way to meowgical glory in no-holds-barred space warfare against the canine Grolich Empire!

It has engaging gameplay and a good story line. However, what impressed me even more is how well this little indie game studio is run and how well the game and launch has been planned out.

If you have a little coin to throw their way, please do. If you don’t, still check out the SpaceCats in Space! Kickstarter page for a blueprint on how to put together and market a unique indie game.

– Don

For Customers Only – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

For Customers Only

A man and a clerk haggle over store policy.

Wanna know the magic bullet for writing a good comedy script? Sorry, there isn’t one. Thanks for playing. Next!

But if you want to get close, here’s a tip – write a script that highlights a universal frustration, then go over the top and lambast the living hell out of it. That’s why satire is so effective: one of the purposes of humor is that it functions as a psychological defense; providing us poor humans a way to deal with the million miserable things that happen to us regularly – and keeping us from going postal.

Fortunately, there’s no limit of stuff to rag on. And close to the top of the list? Not having access to a bathroom during an… emergency.

That’s the focus of For Customers Only, a short that deals with bathroom humor – in a very literal sense. When the script opens, poor Trent Page is having a bad day.   And it’s about to get even worse. He’s waiting for the bus when his stomach gurgles, signifying… well, you know. He heads to a nearby convenience store to use the bathroom, only to be informed it’s for “Customers Only.” But Trent doesn’t have his wallet. And the old clerk, Carl, is standing firm. Trent attempts to give Carl his phone as collateral. No dice. Upping the ante, he hands over his Rolex. That sacrifice buys him the needed permission; at least until another customer arrives – intent on robbing the store! Things only get, uh, shittier from there…

Admittedly not a high-brow, For Customers is a humorous rollercoaster of fun…all the way to it’s over the top conclusion. If you’re looking for a comedy, give this script serious consideration. After all, it’s a tale your audience can relate to.

About the writer: Brett Martin is an unrepped screenwriter living in Los Angeles that specializes in cross-genre thrillers. He sold an action/thriller  to Quixotic Productions, owned by actor/producer Brett Stimely  (WatchmenTransformers 3). Mark Castaldo of Destiny Pictures  recently hired Brett to write an inspirational sports drama. Montreal-based CineVita Films is producing a concept short for Brett’s new contained thriller spec, which is a unique modern take on a classic public domain fairy tale that Hollywood’s never cracked – yet.

Pages: 8

Budget: Pretty cheap. You just need a convenience store to shoot in (maybe the Clerks location’s available?) That – and a handful actors – should do the trick!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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