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Monday, April 14, 2014

Coprophagia – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

 

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Coprophagia

A horror/satire about dog poop. Really.

GROSSOMETER ALERT – LEVEL ELEVEN – YOU HAVE BEEN DULY WARNED.

Some of you have read the title and already cringing. Others of you – the ones with a less eccletic vocabulary… well, consider yourselves blessed. For now.

In a world where torture porn films are the norm, it’s hard to shock an audience these days.  Dismemberments. Exploding body parts. Grisly sexual assaults. And comedy is just as jaded.  After American Pie (both flute and pie), The Hangover and the Bridesmaid vomit scenes…  We’ve all become Comfortably Numb. You can’t reach us now.

Consider the bar raised. Once again.

The premise to Coprophagia is actually quite simple.  Protag Jeff is your stereotypical good guy.  He lives in the suburbs, has the hots for his neighbor Rachel, and owns a Golden Retriever named Buddy.  He only has one little problem: Buddy’s taken to eating his own poop.  (Quick note: this isn’t the horrible part. Anyone with dogs is used to charming acts like that.)  Fortunately, Jeff’s vet prescribes a new medicine, and it works like a charm.  Buddy stops chowing down, and Rachel agrees to come over for a home cooked meal.  Jeff – however – finds himself experiencing certain… cravings.  Ones that are becoming difficult to control.  Will Jeff overcome his insane obsession? Or will his date with Rachel go to, uh, sh*t?

As gross as it is, Coprophagia (the script, as well as the act) is difficult to explain.  It’s well written – and the story’s solid; with a satisfactory ending. (I won’t say it “explodes”.  That would just be too childish.) When reading this one, it pays to bear in mind that this is a world where the Human Centipede did well, and even spawned a sequel.  In the right hands, Coprophagia could be a gem of a dark horror comedy… one that your audience would *never* forget.

About the writer: Chris Shamburger was a semi-finalist in the 2011 Shriekfest Film Festival and finalist (Top 10) in 2013 for his recently-produced script, Hiccups. He was a semi-finalist in the 2008 Straight Twisted Horror Screenplay Contest and has been published in Twisted Dreams Magazine and Horror in Words. He lives in Marietta, GA with his partner and their Chow-mix rescue, Walter. Aside from writing, Chris has been teaching pre-kindergarten for the past five years. (Kind of explains a lot, doesn’t it?)

Pages: 14

Budget: Moderate.  Three main characters and a handful of supporting roles.  A number of suburban settings: outdoors, a house interior, and a vet’s office.  You’d have to do a bit of animal wrangling in this one, but nothing that requires “tricks”.  As for the FX?  Well, you’re on your own when it comes to props….

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR VISIT THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

 

Friday, April 11, 2014

Ginger Snaps screenplay - posted by Don

Ginger Snaps - July 15, 1996 draft script by Karen Walton – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

Is becoming a woman analogous, in some deep psychological way, to becoming a werewolf? Ginger is 16, edgy, tough, and, with her younger sister, into staging and photographing scenes of death. They’ve made a pact about dying together. In early October, on the night she has her first period, which is also the night of a full moon, a werewolf bites Ginger. Within a few days, some serious changes happen to her body and her temperament. Her sister Brigitte, 15, tries to find a cure with the help of Sam, a local doper. As Brigitte races against the clock, Halloween and another full moon approach, Ginger gets scarier, and it isn’t just local dogs that begin to die.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

A Trick of the Mind – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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A Trick of the Mind

Page International Screenwriting Awards

A newlywed couple’s walk in the woods becomes a battle for survival when one of them is gravely injured.

For a lot of indie directors, the holy grail for a script is one location, two characters  – a ton of drama, and nothing else.  At least, if they have the chops and the actors to pull it off.

If this describes you, then you’ll want to give A Trick of the Mind a try.

At first glance, Trick might seem a daunting script.  Forty full pages…. And it’s a short.

And yet, this one’s a surprisingly quick read.  One which could translate to a riveting story onscreen.

A Finalist in the 2012 Page Awards, Trick follows the story of Natalie and Nick – a newly wed couple camping in the winter woods.  They stop at a bridge to take in the view; only to have the rotted wood disintegrate under their feet, sending Nick plummeting to the ground. Almost paralyzed, Nick starts to hallucinate. He tells Natalie of a dark invisible stranger who hovers nearby– telling him horrible things, and threatening both of their safety.

Lost and cold, Natalie’s forced to go it alone.  Will she survive – and bring help in time to save Nick – both from his injuries and whatever lurks in the woods?

Despite these details, it would be a mistake to think of Trick as an “evil things in the forest horror script.”  At its heart, this one’s a solid drama – one that will have its audience rooting until the end.

About the writer: A Canadian writer residing in British Columbia, Ryan Soprovich can be reached at ryzocasa – AT – telus.net

Pages: 41

Budget: Low.  All that’s needed are two characters and a patch of woods.  Admittedly, you’ll need a variety of terrain (including a bridge), and actors that aren’t afraid to get scraped up.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

Page

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR VISIT THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Cooked – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Cooked

A this-or-that of urban legends as an old cat lady goes about her day. …

There’s something about mixing horror and comedy that just works so well.  You know, like Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – mix chocolate and peanut butter (or is that peanut butter and chocolate?), and the result is better than any single ingredient.  Doubt me on that?  Try some of these titles on for size: Army of Darkness, Shaun of the Dead,  American Werewolf in London (in parts.).  ‘Nuff said.  Game, set and match.

Following in that noble of tradition of laughing at potentially grisly events, Cooked follows the story of little old lady Barbara, as she pulls into her driveway.  Her son Jacob has lent her the family cat for a day of fur-baby sitting – and Barbara’s thrilled.  But, as old people sometimes are (especially in films), Barbara can be a bit… absentminded.  As the script progresses, the feline dangers in house begin to mount.  An open microwave.  Upended knives in the sink.  Will Barbara be a good grand-mamma to little pussy?  Or is there a cat-astrophe in their future?

Give Cooked a read.  It’s a fun little script with a strong ending.  And hey…  any script that endangers a cat is fine with me.

About the writer: Chris Shamburger was a semi-finalist in the 2011 Shriekfest Film Festival and finalist (Top 10) in 2013 for his recently-produced script, Hiccups. He was a semi-finalist in the 2008 Straight Twisted Horror Screenplay Contest and has been published in Twisted Dreams Magazine and Horror in Words. He lives in Marietta, GA with his partner and their Chow-mix rescue, Walter. Aside from writing, Chris has been teaching pre-kindergarten for the past five years.

Pages: 4

Budget: Low budget ; the entire script takes place at a single house (interior and exterior shots.)  One character.  Two, if you count the cat.  Which  is probably the only tricky part.  But that’s what stuffed props are for!! Or housecats you no longer need…

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

A Mighty Fire – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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A Mighty Fire

A blues-man seeks a legendary recording that may be nothing more than old rumors…or it might just be real.

When it comes to serving up memorable horror with unique characters and fresh concepts that haven’t been done to genre-death, it’s hard to beat Robert Newcomer.  Showcased previously at STS, “Bert” (as he’s affectionately known when we’re feeling cheeky) is also writer of Someplace Nice and Dark, a creepy little riff involving a delivery boy, a trailer, and an old man afraid of his own shadow.

In Mighty Fire, the setting is more exotic: a beat up old record shop in New Orleans.  Not the tourist section. The Seventh Ward.  Young blues wanna Jean Juneau arrives on the shop’s porch seeking the last record of blues legend Robert Johnson (rumored to have been recorded while Johnson was dying from a bad case of poison and a woman scorned.)  Known as Mighty Fire, the record is said to be the ultimate blues experience: agony and ecstasy all rolled into one.

Jean pawns his guitar and gets the recording.  Has he made the deal of a lifetime? Or a contract with the Devil himself?  Crack this script open, and find out!

About the writer:  Robert Newcomer recently received his first IMDB credit for another short, Them That’s Dead.  An intelligent writer, he has several other shorts and a horror feature length available for consideration. (IMDB credits listed here.)

Pages: 14

Budget: Moderate.  There are a handful of characters and settings: the record shop, a bar, and a room.  There may be some FX expense incurred to make sure one gets the atmosphere right. But for scripts like this, it’s worth the price.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The Wild Bunch screenplay - posted by Don

The Wild Bunch - February 7, 1968 unspecified draft script by Walon Green & Sam Peckinpah (Story by Roy Sickner) – hosted by: Daily Script – in pdf format

An aging group of outlaws look for one last big score as the “traditional” American West is disappearing around them.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More Movie Scripts on the Movie Scripts page.

Restraint – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Restraint

A father, trapped in a quarantined city, tries to save his daughter from a terrible fate.

With scripts, sometimes less is more.  Less characters. Less settings. Less FX.  In the right directorial hands, this strategy translates to focusing on what’s important.  IE: the drama between one’s chosen characters. The emotion, the conflict. The urgency.

That’s the essence behind Restraint.  The script opens with Doting Father Fenton sneaking out to a driveway with baby Jessica, strapped with care into her car seat.  He attempts to hotwire the vehicle. Quietly.  From his actions – and news alerts on his phone – it quickly becomes obvious that we’re dealing with a quarantine situation.  Possibly a mini World-War Z.

With armed soldiers on the way –  and infected unseen creatures everywhere – this script is the proverbial ticking time bomb.  Will Fenton and Jessica escape in time?  Or suffer some monstrous fate?

Whether one’s taste run to Romero or the Walking Dead, fans of the zombie genre know that some of the best writing comes from focusing on the human element, and surprise. Restraint pulls that off – successfully.

About the writer: Pete Barry is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright, actor, director and musician. His short plays have been published in numerous collections. He’s also a cofounder of the Porch Room, a film and theater production company, website available at http://www.porchroom.com/.  Please feel free to reach out to him with script requests at petebarry27 “AT” Hotmail.

Pages: 5

Budget: Very low.  Characters include only Baby Jessica and Fenton. The setting: a driveway and a parked car. There’s a small amount of FX makeup, that could probably be done in post.

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR VISIT THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

Monday, April 7, 2014

Original Script Sunday (on a Monday) – Jaws inspired OWC entries - posted by Don

Thanks to Darren James Seeley for his idea for the One Week Challenge. The OWC was inspired by a fan’s callout for low budget and brave filmmakers to crank out a series of Jaws fan-films by October 2015 as according to the possible future timeline seen in “Back To The Future II” (boy that almanac sure came in handy!) when ‘Jaws 19′ would be released.

Thirty brave writers took the challenge. Check ‘em out!

-Don

Trick of the Trade – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Trick of the Trade

When young Harry needs money to buy a gift, he learns that crime does pay, but in an unexpected way.

There’s something about scripts involving school boy crushes, and first loves.  Then again – who doesn’t like stories about disreputable (yet somehow charming) con men?  If you nodded to both of those statements, then Trick of the Trade is right for you.  Because this is a script that actually incorporates both of these elements into one package.

Little Harry Cartwright is a simple rural kid, growing up in Depression era Oklahoma.  The light of his life is Susie Clemons, a pretty little school girl and Harry’s first love.  Unfortunately for both, Susie’s family is moving to Texas. In just two weeks. A crestfallen Harry’s committed to getting her a school photo of himself as a keepsake.  Problem is, it costs a quarter.  And that’s way too expensive for him.

After his request is rebuffed by his father, Harry sets off to the local Pharmacy to see if he can steal the dough.  He’s stopped by Roscoe – a local con man and n’er do well – who tells him to leave the stealin’ to more capable folk.  Undeterred, Harry glues himself to Roscoe, determined to earn his pay… in addition to that damned quarter.

The result?  A combination of Ocean’s Eleven meets Mark Twain.  It’s a satisfying story with a lot of character… perfect for a director looking to prove their storytelling chops.

About the writer: Gary Howell is an attorney who has been writing as a hobby for years, and his short “The Family Man,” led to a connection with an Australian film director. The two collaborated on a feature film, “Broad Daylight,” which is currently in pre-production, with filming to begin in New Orleans in July. He is currently working on two new features.

Pages: 18

Budget: Moderate to Average.  Trick of the Trade is a period piece.  And there are a variety of locations, and characters. Despite that, there’s not much needed in the way of FX – this script is far more character/actor focused than anything else.

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR VISIT THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

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    A New York City DJ struggles with intimacy, death, and depression in the weeks leading up a world changing event. 29 pages
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