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Friday, April 10, 2015

Congratulations to David Troop – Naughty Optioned! - posted by wonkavite

Please join us in a resounding congratulations to David Troop, whose comedy script, Naughty, has been optioned by Steve Callas.

Here’s a tantalizing little bit about Steve: Steven Callas is a Greek-American producer and assistant director from Chicago. He has worked on FOX’s musical drama “Empire,” “Love is a Four Letter Word” (NBC), “Runner” (FOX), and has assistant directed and produced a variety of award winning short films and web series. He runs a small studio called Some Film Company that discovers interesting stories and develops them for film. In general, he particularly loves working with writers to fully develop their scripts and then convert those scripts into an actual film. Per Steve: “All my projects that I’ve produced have started with writers coming to me with a script or a series of scripts.”  We’ll keep our readers abreast on production news for Naughty, of course!

In meantime, y’all might want to get a gander at the links below: ’cause being Naughty is definitely nice.  As are other reviewed scripts David has in store…

Baby Steps (Comedy) – You never forget the first time you fall in love – even if you were in diapers.

Allison’s Birthday (Drama) – Two parents mark the birthday milestones in their daughter’s life

Snow Day (Drama) – A grumpy old man spends a snowy day with his granddaughter.

Nebraska (Drama) – A young boy counts down the days until his best friend moves away.

Sex and Violins (Comedy) – A young woman has difficulty finding love because of her unusual fondness for the violin.

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Marguerite – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Marguerite

An aging diva finds her cherished voice failing her with a treacherous understudy waiting in the wings. But she has a few magical tricks up her sleeve

 “The devil’s voice is sweet to hear.” — Stephen King, Needful Things, 1991.

But it’s not the devil’s voice that takes center stage in “Marguerite,” a short script by John P. Dowgin — it’s Marguerite’s own voice, although there’s clearly some devilry going on behind the scenes. “Marguerite” is a modern Gothic horror tale rife with jealousy and treachery and the lust for fame and fortune. And voodoo.

Marguerite Woolsley is an aging African-American diva who will stop at nothing to preserve her youth… and her voice. She’s set to make her triumphant comeback in a modern revival of Scott Joplin’s opera, “Treemonisha,” which tells the tale of slave life on a southern plantation in the 1800s. But the title character is an 18-year-old woman, and Marguerite is in her 60s. As the screenplay tells us, “Her age shows even under stage makeup, but cannot dim her presence.” More important for an opera singer, though, is her voice, and it’s not what it once was. During a dress rehearsal she tries to hit a high “C” and her voice cracks. “The note she hits is not only clearly wrong, it’s not even close.” The producers panic, but not Marguerite. A little dose of voodoo — some candles, animals skulls, a necklace made of bones, and thirteen dead crows — and voila! Her voice is sweet again. As sweet as, well… the devil’s.

But Marguerite’s understudy, Therese, has plans of her own. And some voodoo of her own, too. Like a predator sensing weakness, she strikes, sabotaging Marguerite’s voodoo talisman, her gris-gris bag, and we watch as Marguerite withers. First her voice goes, and then, when we last see Marguerite, “Her face is ancient skin stretched over bone. Her eyes have recessed into her skull.”

And Therese is set for her “triumphant debut” in “Treemonisha.”

But there’s voodoo, and there’s voodoo. And when Marguerite’s gnarled hand reaches into her hidden voodoo shrine and retrieves the ancient book, the mysterious pearl box, and the magic red powder, it can only mean one thing…

…not so fast, Therese!

About the writer: John P. Dowgin is a playwright, screenwriter, director and actor, as well as a founding member of the production company The Porch Room (porchroom.com) for whom he directed the original work ‘Antony & Cleopatra: Infinite Lives” at the 2013 New York International Fringe Festival. Two of John’s plays have been published in the compilation “Accidents Happen” by Samuel French, and have been performed in New York, Los Angeles, Indianapolis, Toronto, Dublin, and Australia. A number of his screenplays are also in ‘development’, which he suspects to be a theoretical dimension like Oz. He lives in New Jersey with his wife and son.

Pages: 17

Budget: Rather high, but manageable, and definitely worth every penny. Locations (e.g., the Metropolitan Opera House) and some aging effects would be the most expensive budget items. If they were simulated somehow, the overall budget would be moderate.

About the guest reviewer: Helen Magellan (a pseudonym) is a successful screenwriter with several produced short scripts under her belt.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Incident on I-95 – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Incident on I-95

The arrival of an ominous stranger shatters the serenity of an idyllic American town.

It’s often thought Utopian societies are the way to go. In a time where the O-zone is depleted, terrorists could be living in the apartment below you, and there’s something scary on the news every day – it’s nice to imagine a world where peace, health, and tranquility reign.

One day – humanity dreams – the perfect world will exist. But is that truly possible? After all, one of the greatest contributors to Chaos is the nature of humanity itself. Humans – no matter how peaceful, clean, and healthy their environment – are at heart wild animals ready to strike. Especially when confronted with something they deem threatening.

The soul of Utopian SF is dark satire. And Fred Perry’s Incident on I-95’s got that. In spades.

Picture if you will: a man disembarks from a bus. A stranger out for an innocent walk, and on snowy peaceful night…

As Incident heads towards its crescendo, the man strolls casually through lanes and alleyways. Taking in the serenity of a small, perfect town. But his wanderings are about to take a turn for the worse – into the hands of a bloodthirsty, angry mob. As to what triggers the violence? Read the script. Because this is one satisfying twist you’ll never guess…

A simplistic story wrapped in rich, deep visuals, Incident on I-95 is a joy to read. All the way from its soothing beginnings, to the thought provoking climatic end!

About the writer, Fred Perry: Fred Perry has worked as a screenwriter in Europe, Mexico and the U.S., co-authoring six feature films for Omega Entertainment, Athens, Greece, as well as collaborating on multiple projects with Alfonso Arau (director of LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE and A WALK IN THE CLOUDS).

Fred’s screenplays have won numerous awards. His dark comedy short, FIVE DAYS IN CALCUTTA, won the Grand Prize in the 2014 Palm Street Films Screenplay Competition (shorts category), 1st Place at the 2014 Richmond International Film Festival (comedy screenplay genre), 1st Place, 2013 Fresh Voices Screenplay Competition (shorts), the Grand Prize, 2014 American Movie Awards (shorts), 1st, 2013 DC Shorts Film Festival and Screenplay Competition, 1st, 82nd (2013) Annual Writer’s Digest Writing Competition (subsequently published), the Gold Prize in the 2013 Hollywood Screenplay Competition (shorts), and 1st in the 2012 PAGE International Screenplay Awards (shorts). The script will shoot this January, directed by Dawn Fields of Palm Street Films.

His feature sci-fi script, CROSSINGS won the Grand Jury Award for Best Feature Screenplay at the 2014 Richmond International Film Festival, 1st at the 2014 Omaha Film Festival, 1st in the 9th annual Filmmakers International Screenplay Competition, 1st in the 2013 Holiday Screenplay Competition, and was a semifinalist in the 2013 Academy Nicholl Fellowships.

He is a published playwright, his two-act, THE ASCENSION OF TWYLA POTTS, winning the 2013 London Film Festival (stage play category), and earning the Special Marquee Award at this year’s American Film Awards. Fred has also written and directed plays at the Colony Theatre in Los Angeles and the Carrollwood Players Theatre in Tampa Bay.

Pages: 5

Budget: Moderate. A quick shot of a bus, and small-town streets. Lots of extra for the crowd.

About the reviewer, Rod Thompson: I have been writing creatively since I learned how to write. There is just something about telling a story that I can never get over. Storytelling in itself is like an old flame that occasionally comes to me and just says, “Use me.” The ability to watch a movie through words, or to craft a world in such a manner is the closest to Godliness that man will ever come. True story. Contact Rod at RodThompson1980 “AT” gmail.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Along the Roadside – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Along the Roadside

A murderous drifter meets his match along a desolate stretch of rural road.

Gotta love any script that manages to intertwine a geriatric crocheting in the back seat of a sedan with serial killer butcherings…

Which is exactly what Along the Roadside, from Brian Wind, manages to great comedic effect. Of course that’s comedy as black as the La Brea Tar Pits!

Let’s join sweet old couple Parker and Taylor as they take a leisurely drive down a rural road. A figure in the distance waves them down, so they stop to offer the stranger a lift. That lonely figure is Yancy – the kind of hitcher the geriatric couple should leave stranded at the curbside, choking on their diesel dust. But hey – they’re old, naive and trusting. Just what Yancy’s counting on.

Did I mention that Yancy kills people who pick him up? Yep – that’s his standard M.O.

In fact, he mentions that detail to his over friendly benefactors, who seem to take it far too well (beyond a Waltons-esque exclamation or two). Even Yancy is puzzled. For awhile.

You can probably work out the twist by now. Or at least part of it. But there’s an Easter egg or two in this one, pertaining to Taylor’s name…

A great example of less being more, Along the Roadside packs a hell of a lot into five pages and limited characters. With an overload of dark humor.

About the writer: Brian Wind can be contacted at bwind22 “at” yahoo!

Pages: 5

Budget: A very affordable shoot: limited location – small cast. We’ve only got one warning: budget for a quick trip to the grocery store…

About the reviewer: Anthony Cawood is an award winning screenwriter from the UK with four shorts produced, two in post production and another 10 short scripts optioned/sold. You can find out more at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, April 6, 2015

A Line in the Sand – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

A Line in the Sand

Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive. – The Dalai Lama

“A Line in the Sand,” a short screenplay by award-winning screenwriter (and graphic novelist) Tim Westland, describes a gritty dystopian future, a civilization on the edge, at a crossroads — a dramatic, high-tension moment that could either rescue mankind from itself or cause our society to unravel completely.

The story takes place in 2037, and like all the best tales of futuristic dystopias (e.g. Blade Runner, The Matrix, etc.), “A Line in the Sand” is a masterful blend of two things: First, it’s a rockin’ good sci-fi story (complete with all the trimmings — UltraMarines, exo-suits, and high-tech weaponry) with a somber gloominess about it. This is one possible future that we hope never comes to pass. And secondly — it’s totally plausible. It could come to pass. “A Line in the Sand” pits religious fanaticism against nuclear madness. It’s like a headline from today’s news — projected twenty years into the future. Scary, to say the least.

There’s a third thing that ramps up the emotional impact of this script — more than anything else it’s a story about people. Specifically two people: two men, both warriors, but radically different nonetheless. One is a military man trying to save the world; the other a fanatical religious terrorist trying to tear it to shreds.

They meet on a California beach at sunset after the terrorist group has destroyed a nuclear reactor. It’s a horrific scene. As UltraMarine John Hawkins says, it’s “going to stain this coastline for the next ten thousand years.” While he combs through the rubble on the beach, he stumbles upon a lone survivor, one of the terrorists. The man is badly injured, “covered with festering radiation sores.” Hawkins could kill him right then and there. Why not? An eye for an eye and all that. Among the horror and the wreckage, what’s one more death?

But the damage is already done; one more death won’t make things right. And Hawkins is a compassionate man. So when the injured terrorist asks for a favor – the chance to enjoy one last sunset – Hawkins carries him to the beach and props him up against a rock at the water’s edge. As they listen to the waves crash against the shoreline and watch the sun touch the horizon, the two men share philosophies: one contemplating a grim future, the other with not much future left.

But which is which? And, the terrorist’s storyline isn’t quite yet. It turns out there’s still some life radiating within him.

Is the Dalai Lama right? Without compassion can humanity survive?

Maybe Hawkins should have killed him when he had the chance….

Pages: 6

Budget: Moderate-to-high. Some futuristic scene setting may be required, but with some creativity (or some CGI), they could be simulated.

About the writer: The co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, Tim Westland received first place for Balls Out in the NNYM 15 page contest. A moderator at Moviepoet, he’s an outstanding writer with an eye for the details. His IMDB page can be found here.

About the reviewer: Helen Magellan (a pseudonym) is a successful screenwriter with several produced short scripts under her belt.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Original Script Sunday for April 5th - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are twenty six original scripts for your reading pleasure.

Don

Friday, April 3, 2015

Quorum – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

4/3/14 STS Update: Quorum – AKA Town Hall Incident – has been selected as a finalist in the Marquee Lights and IFIPIG short script competitions.  So grab this one before it’s gone!

Quorum

A small town sheriff gets the drop on uninvited visitors from out of town – and Big Government’s meddling.

Big Government. Sticking its massive horns into State and Local County rights. It’s a real inflammatory issue these days, served up with a rainbow of different flavors. Religious displays. Gun ownership. Environmental and Social concerns, clashing against property rights. Topics such as these get folks all hot and bothered – regardless of which side of the issue one lands on. But one thing we can all agree. Watching David get the best of Goliath – that’s a mighty satisfying feeling. No matter what political pin shines on your lapel.

Take Jack Burns – County Sheriff of an unnamed locality, smack dab in the middle of USA Anywhere. As is normal in such small districts, Jack wears several hats. For instance, Chairperson of the County Board of Supervisors – an assembly just about to meet. And this time, they’ve got guests. Namely, Carl Welsh – EPA. And Randall Eckhard, attorney. The two have breezed in from out of town, to ensure certain laws get enforced. It’s quite a laundry list they hold in their hands. Local Farmer Reed, accused of draining ecologically delicate swamp land. Then there’s the removal of religious symbols from town property. The Cross – displayed up until recently in court. And then there’s that Navity Scene

Both are conspicuously absent when the Feds arrive. Sheriff Jack’s in full compliance… or is he? Or do the townsfolk have something up their sleeve? Something that’ll turn Big Government’s demands on its head. And Goliath to his knees?

Humorous and definitely controversial, Quorum is bound to get your audience chattering. It’s a satiric piece with all the right beats. Mr. Mark Twain would be very proud.

About the writer, Fred Perry: Fred Perry has worked as a screenwriter in Europe, Mexico and the U.S., co-authoring six feature films for Omega Entertainment, Athens, Greece, as well as collaborating on multiple projects with Alfonso Arau (director of LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE and A WALK IN THE CLOUDS).

Fred’s screenplays have won numerous awards. His dark comedy short, FIVE DAYS IN CALCUTTA, won the Grand Prize in the 2014 Palm Street Films Screenplay Competition (shorts category), 1st Place at the 2014 Richmond International Film Festival (comedy screenplay genre), 1st Place, 2013 Fresh Voices Screenplay Competition (shorts), the Grand Prize, 2014 American Movie Awards (shorts), 1st, 2013 DC Shorts Film Festival and Screenplay Competition, 1st, 82nd (2013) Annual Writer’s Digest Writing Competition (subsequently published), the Gold Prize in the 2013 Hollywood Screenplay Competition (shorts), and 1st in the 2012 PAGE International Screenplay Awards (shorts). The script will shoot this January, directed by Dawn Fields of Palm Street Films.

His feature sci-fi script, CROSSINGS won the Grand Jury Award for Best Feature Screenplay at the 2014 Richmond International Film Festival, 1st at the 2014 Omaha Film Festival, 1st in the 9th annual Filmmakers International Screenplay Competition, 1st in the 2013 Holiday Screenplay Competition, and was a semifinalist in the 2013 Academy Nicholl Fellowships.

He is a published playwright, his two-act, THE ASCENSION OF TWYLA POTTS, winning the 2013 London Film Festival (stage play category), and earning the Special Marquee Award at this year’s American Film Awards. Fred has also written and directed plays at the Colony Theatre in Los Angeles and the Carrollwood Players Theatre in Tampa Bay.

Pages: 11

Budget: Very low. One small “courthouse” and you’re fine.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Thursday, April 2, 2015

By the Power Vested in Me – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

By the Power Vested in Me

Will a power outage serve as a sign that a wedding shouldn’t happen?

Weddings. They’re very nervous affairs – even under the best conditions. Should I? Shouldn’t I? Am I making the biggest mistake of my life? And what of that ex I still carry a smoldering torch for… Will I regret this in the morning light?

Such questions flow through a lot of guy’s minds, on the morning of their wedding day.

And so it is with Nate when he awakes. 25 and engaged to Christina. Yet he still has feelings for his ex-girlfriend, Audry. As the script opens, Nate’s family busies themselves in the backyard barn – arranging flowers for the ceremony. A thunderstorm rages overhead; a mirror to Nate’s conflicted feelings.

…which is when the lights cut out. It’s a downed powerline – killing the electricity. Is it a Harbinger of Doom: God’s way of saying “no way?”.

The crisis throws Nate’s turmoil into emergency overdrive. He races (without tuxedo) to his truck, and peels out of the driveway. Where is he heading? To his true love, Audry? Or perhaps Interstate 90, and beyond.

The DJ and guests arrive. The wedding hour nears. Nate and Christina’s parents scramble to do their best without power… but secretly worry if Nate will arrive. For storms can ruin many things. Including marriages, before they’re born…

Written by professional storyteller Rick Hansberry, Power is a marvelous slice of life drama. A double entendre title with ticking clock urgency, this is one script with lots of charm.

About the writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

Pages: 7

Budget: Medium. A few settings, and a storm. But nothing that can’t be augmented with post.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Hunted – Feature Length Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Hunted

After accidentally shooting a girl in the mysterious Ozark mountains, five hunting buddies must battle for their lives and their souls when a backwoods hillbilly taxidermist invokes ancient supernatural powers to bring his monstrous patchwork creations to life to exact his revenge.

Horror – a genre both beloved… and maligned. Those who love it, know what it can accomplish at its best. Churning out metaphysical creeps that last far into the night – long after final credits roll. The genre’s created true classics: The Shining. Jacob’s Ladder. The lesser known Changeling.

But not everything horror need be sublime. There’s more than a little to be said for fun, gore. Pure mayhem. Gremlins. Tremors. Reanimator. Child’s Play. These films may lack intellectual cache… but they’re classics all the same. And what happened to those rockin’ times? Horror these days is so… mundane. Possessions. Slashers. Tons of jump-screams. But – sadly – little else.

Which is why scripts like Hunted are so DAMNED fun.

The script starts as many horrors do. A bunch of buddies head into the woods, bound for a hunting/camping trip. Some are jerks. Others good guys. Already, you know most won’t survive. Though in this case, the victims to-be are Iraqi veterans. At least that means they’ll fight back. The most respectable of the bunch: Zion Edwards. African American, battle scarred, weary… and (thanks to an IED) – missing one of his legs. Along with comrades Will, Sean, Craig and Bo, Zion’s looking to commune with nature, and enjoy some long-overdue peace. Too bad he won’t be getting either.

Losing their way*, the team pit-stops at a decrepit mobile home. The owner – Hillbilly Earl – intercepts them at his door. The place looks like Frankstein’s castle – Animal Planet style. Earl’s into taxidermy. The weird, backwoods variety. The lawn’s littered with his creations: strange amalgams of multiple species, sewn together crudely. Jackalopes. A two headed dog. Badgers with Hawk Wings, and Frog Legs spliced everywhere. Needless to say, the meeting doesn’t go well. Especially after Craig swears in front of Earl’s wretched daughter, Sesame… and gets a punch in the mouth as a lesson.

Dodging the inevitable confrontation, our buddies head on their way. But before you can mutter Deliverance, things take a turn towards something far worse. You see, Earl’s been dabbling in Olde Magick. The creatures on his lawn are alive. And Sesame’s not his daughter. She’s his soon-to-be sacrifice.

You see, Earl’s been preparing for a big event. The reanimation of his ultimate creation – kept in his living room, under a tarp. But before Earl can sharpen his hooks and knives, Sesame escapes into the forest, wearing a mud-drenched fur coat. And gets accidentally shot by Craig…

Things go to Hell from there. Bo and Will race with a critically injured Sesame into town, leaving the others to clean up the mess. And that’s when Earl’s mixed up minions descend. After all, good ‘ole Earl needs a replacement for Sesame. Not to mention revenge…

How to explain what happens next? Well picture the chaos (and humor) of Gremlins, mixed with Jim Hensen… on acid. Fur and feathers fly – and blood rains. You want a horror with a large body count, that stands heads and furry shoulders above the pack? Then consider Hunted for your next feature. It’s a script that serves up more than its share of craziness. The wild, gory, memorable kind.

Pages: 107

Budget: Hunted can be done two ways: Animatronic or CGI. Either way, you’d want to be sure you do them critters up ‘jus right.  ‘Cause a beaver with Hawk wings?  That’s something we just have to see!

About the writers:

Rod Thompson: Rod Thompson is an award winning, produced screenwriter of both shorts and features. His tally includes one produced feature length film, four produced short films, a Table Read My Screenplay genre win for Best Drama, a BlueCat Quarter-finalist placing, two NAFF Quarter-finalists and one Semi-finalist placing. Contact Rod at RodThompson1980 “AT” gmail.com.

Tim Westland: co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, Tim received first place for Balls Out in the NNYM 15 page contest. A moderator at Moviepoet, he’s an outstanding writer with an eye for the details. His IMDB page can be found here.

* What is it with horrors, and losing one’s ability to read a map?

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

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April 19, 2015

    Death Pod by Simon Parker

    After the sudden death of his wife a great scientist uses a secret military weapon to transport her back to life, but when she sees the price of this weapon she takes her own life. But she will then learn that death will never be an escape.
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