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Tuesday, July 19, 2016

The Bridge – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

The Bridge
There are over 600,000 bridges in the U.S. alone.
Four friends discover the horror that lurks beneath one of them.

We all remember that day in high school when your first friend obtained their driving license. All the locked doors of the world opened up wide for you and your gang. Leaving… no limits where you could go.

Well, unless the car stops working.

In The Bridge, this unwelcome situation is exactly where our four teenage adventurers find themselves: Billy (the driver), Shawn, Mark, and Katie.

As Fate would have it, they’ve broken down at the end of a rusty, metallic bridge. On a wet, cold night. It’s a bad situation, to say the least.

As it turns out, the mechanical illness that’s befallen their vehicle isn’t easily curable. All four tires are flat. Immediately, confusion reigns:

MARK
What’d you run over?

BILLY
Nothing! This is bullshit!

Requiring relief (both physically and mentally), Mark separates himself from the group, and finds an ideal spot over a railing in the center of the bridge.

Little does he know that’s the last time he’ll ever pee.

Thanks to the lack of lighting, the others don’t even know Mark’s disappeared. At least, until Katie realizes the sound of liquid has stopped.

So she goes over to the same spot.

And suffers the same fate as Mark.

Meanwhile, an oblivious Billy and Shawn argue over what their next course of action should be. When they finally reach a consensus, and call out to the others, they find silence. No answer comes.

So they walk across the bridge to find…

Will Billy and Shawn be the next victims? Can they escape a watery, bloody fate? What’s the actual danger that lurks in the dark? You’ll have to read this one and see.

Don’t let the single setting fool you. The sheer simplicity of this script offers horror directors endless creative possibilities. Pick this one up, and Bridge the gap between yourself and your next festival award!

Pages: 7

Budget: As with many horrors, directors have a choice to go for lots of FX, or imply things with atmosphere and shadows. The result: different possible budgets. It just depends where one wants to go.

About the Reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the Writer: Jordan became addicted to writing in 1995, when as a wee lad, his work garnered recognition among his professors. Since that time, he’s written several short scripts that have been received as “life changing”, “prophetic”, and “orgasmic”. As a finalist in the 72 Hour Script Fest, his words gave birth to the award winning film, Made For Each Other. Jordan doesn’t usually refer to himself in the third person, but when he does, he tends to embellish as evidenced above. He does however encourage people to make the world a better place by educating them through his writing, photography, and filmmaking. Please contact him at JLScripts79 at gmail dot com.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, July 18, 2016

Cigarette Break by Ayham Saati filmed - posted by Don

Cigarette Break (8 pages in pdf format) by Ayham Saati has been filmed.

Smoking can REALLY hurt you.

Watch it here!

Talk about it on the Discussion Board

Love Glow – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Love Glow
Weird things can happen when love is involved.

Love is a powerful motivator – whether it pertains to friends, family or significant others. What people will not do for loved ones is a short list; and it has the possibility of becoming even shorter, when that bond is tested ‘til it breaks.

In Marnie Mitchell Lister’s short script Love Glow, Rick Turner is your typical easy going twenty-something guy who is focused on one typical thing: his dream girl. As far as he’s concerned, Laura’s the best of the best – and deserves nothing but the best in return. Expensive mansions, luxury cars, unlimited shopping sprees – the sky’s the limit, he thinks.

There’s just one problem…Rick is broke. Painfully so. There isn’t even a glimmer of available funds in his bank account, and Rick can feel his dream life fizzling out before it becomes reality.

So Rick does what any “sane” person would do: he checks himself into an experimental medical trial for a few weeks, one that promises to fund his new life. Success! Or so it seems.

Weeks later, Ricks completes the trial, collects his check, and enlists the help of best friend Matt to give him a ride back home. But there’s one thing he’s neglected – side effects.

Despite giving Matt a “glowing” review of his experience, Rick quickly finds his body going wrong. Coughing fits. Luminescent sweating spells. And that’s when Rick’s ears start to melt.

Will Rick turn into a radioactive pile of goo? Will his dream girl find his ever worsening body desirable? And will Matt ever be able to clean his car?

Love Glow isn’t your typical love story. Instead, it’s a hybrid of the best kind – balancing light humor with the universal theme of love, and a bit of over-the-top sci-fi flare. If you like your SF mixed with comedy, snag this one before it melts away!

Pages: 5

Budget: Mid-range. Yes, there’s a bit of FX involved. But it’s worth it for the festival raves (and laughs)!

About the reviewer: Karis Watie is a writer from Texas who got accidentally transplanted in New England. She is coping by eating dangerous amounts of doughnuts and closely studying television shows that she hopes to one day emulate as a screenwriter. She is pursuing a second bachelor’s degree while not on the couch, to help her dream along. If you want to talk television or drop Karis a spoiler or two, she’s at watiekaris@yahoo.com & @kn_watie on Twitter.

About the writer, Marnie Mitchell Lister: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at http://brainfluffs.com/. Marnie’s had multiple shorts produced and placed Semi-final with her features in BlueCat.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Original Script Sunday for July 17th - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are twenty two original scripts for your reading pleasure.

– Don

Friday, July 15, 2016

Noob – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Noob
An alien-made artificial intelligence faces its greatest challenge: teaching a cantankerous, technology-averse 80-year old human how to work an iPhone.

Old people vs technology: it’s a perennial battle of the ages. And as technology gets more and more advanced, it ain’t gonna get easier any time soon!

Which doesn’t mean one can’t have multiple laughs at its expense…

That’s exactly what James Barron’s satirical Noob aims to do. Lead character Henry’s a grizzled war vet – the kind of guy who thinks physical prowess proves a man’s worth. So when his daughter buys him an iPhone, he struggles to understand the basics – and we mean really “basic”… like turning it on.

Frustrated by failure, the old man’s grief is multiplied when his wife suggests getting help from experts. But Henry’s determined to lone wolf this operation. At first, that doesn’t seem like such a bad idea – Henry calls the correct number for his queries. But then he accidentally changes the language to Spanish. Qué desastre!

Already confused, Henry’s utterly baffled when the weather suddenly changes and a large metallic craft appears. He’s being abducted! So it seems.

As it turns out, his abductor is a computer sent by a technologically advanced species to observe human behaviour for academic reasons – and poses no danger to Henry’s health.

But Henry poses a great threat to the computer…

…because he thinks it’s the Apple support system! And while he didn’t know how to work an iPhone, he certainly doesn’t understand the requests the AI makes – leading to a massive series of escalating communication breakdowns.

Threatening the poor bot’s circuit-sanity.

Hilariously ironic with a brilliant payoff, Noob is a clever commentary of the universal love-hate relationship we have with technology. It’s guaranteed to have everyone laughing – with or without the Genius Bar!

Pages: 11

Budget: Okay, there’s a bit of FX called for here. But nothing a touch of post or CGI can’t handle.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Newly discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow
A bad marriage can turn some people into monsters…

Ever wonder how the most famous couples in fiction made it work after happily ever after? Couples like Tarzan and Jane, Anna and Kristoff, or… Frankenstein and his bride? Well, it might not be as blissful as you’d imagine.

That’s just where we meet Frankenstein and his bride in Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow: in marriage counseling, years after Mary Shelley’s story. Hey, even monsters have problems. He’s distant and literally emotionless, she’s tired of doing the same old things and just wants to go on a killer date (pun intended).

One thing they do agree on: they might be unhappy, but they’re not ready to be separated. “We were literally made for each other” Frankenstein pleads. So the marriage counselor dives in and a really monstrous couples therapy session begins.

As the truth comes out and secrets are revealed, the monster and his bride near a breakthrough… but it seems that every step forward leads to the couple taking two steps back. Will they make it? Not to spoil anything, but this story ends with a nice surprise… and this script is a bloody good time.

Pages: 8

Characters: 3 – Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, marriage counselor

Budget: Low to Mid. Really only two locations, three actors, but you may have to increase the makeup budget to make sure your Stein’s look appropriately gory. That being said, an experienced director with a great crew can make this one look hideous (in the best possible way!)

About the Reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the Writer, Dave Lambertson: I took up writing rather late in life having already been retired before I put pen to paper (okay – finger to computer key) for the first time. My favorite genres to read and write are dramedies and romantic comedies.

In addition to this short, I have written four features; “The Last Statesman” (a 2015 PAGE finalist and a Nicholl’s and BlueCat quarterfinalist), “The Beginning of The End and The End” (a PAGE Semi-Finalist). Taking Stock (a drama) and a new comedy – “Screw You Tube”. Want to learn more? Reach Dave at dlambertson “AT” hotmail! And visit his website at http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

The Object of My Infection – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

The Object Of My Infection
Warning: Adult Content
A CDC research scientist uses the only tools available to her to end an abusive relationship.

Richard Gere played one of the most menacing, hated police characters of all time in 1990’s “Internal Affairs.” With immense help from writer Henry Bean and director Mike Figgis, Gere crafted one of those rare performances where you actually sweat and squirm in your seat while you watch his slimy Dennis Peck lather in deceit, corruption and murder.

Writer David Lambertson has created a similar character in “The Object Of My Infection” with suspended police captain Drew Sanders, a foul creature with police badge tattoos on each bicep who “looks as though he belongs in a Deep South trailer park.”

Drew’s wife Emma is his opposite; a lab technician/scientist at the Center for Disease Control. From page one, the stage is brilliantly set with good (white coat and all) versus evil (a law man we surmise has twisted the law).

There’s no line Drew won’t cross or snort including infidelity, which he blames his wife for.

EMMA
She was here today? In our bed?

Drew doesn’t take his eyes off the television.

DREW
I don’t know what the fuck you’re talking about?

EMMA
I can smell her! I can smell what you did!

Drew takes a long sip of beer.

DREW
(far too casual)
Well, maybe if you weren’t so catatonic in the sack, I wouldn’t
have to be chasing stray pussy.
(beat)
It’s like fucking a corpse with you.

Emma screams at her coked-up husband to leave, throws house keys at him, nicks his cheek – and pays an all-too-painful price. His brutality includes several backhands to Emma’s face before dragging her to the bedroom for their first-ever sodomy session.

Bruised and permanently battered, Emma’s determined to end the vicious cycle despite Drew’s day-after promises to stop using and abusing.

Dangling at the end of her frayed rope, Emma eventually brings home a special treat from work for “Dear Hubby” – in the form of a white powder he thinks is cocaine. Naked on their bed, the only thing she wears is a bump across her stomach and Drew can’t resist, the last in a long line of his mistakes.

There’s no mistaking the quality of storytelling in “The Object Of My Infection,” which would have minimal budget. The biggest hurdle may be finding a location to mimic the CDC.

And finding a brave enough actor to take on Emma’s role.

Pages: 12

Budget: Moderate – except for a lab scene, the other locations are simple… with only two main characters (that better have great emotional range.)

About the reviewer: Zack Zupke is a writer in Los Angeles. Zack was a latch-key kid (insert “awww” here) whose best friend was a 19-inch color television (horrific, he knows). His early education (1st grade on) included watching countless hours of shows like “M*A*S*H,” “Star Trek” and “The Odd Couple” and movies like “The Godfather,” “Rocky” and “Annie Hall.” Flash forward to present day and his short “The Confession” was recently produced by Trident Technical College in Charleston, SC. He’s currently working on a futuristic hitman thriller with a partner and refining a dramedy pilot perfect for the likes of FX. You can reach Zack at zzupke “at” yahoo.

About the writer, Dave Lambertson: I took up writing rather late in life having already been retired before I put pen to paper (okay – finger to computer key) for the first time. My favorite genres to read and write are dramedies and romantic comedies.

In addition to this short, I have written four features; “The Last Statesman” (a 2015 PAGE finalist and a Nicholl’s and BlueCat quarterfinalist), “The Beginning of The End and The End” (a PAGE Semi-Finalist). Taking Stock (a drama) and a new comedy – “Screw You Tube”. Want to learn more? Reach Dave at dlambertson “AT” hotmail! And check out his website for even for goodies HERE! (http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts).

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Cassandra – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Cassandra
A young woman hires a company that claims it can show her future with her boyfriend. But when she discovers a future infidelity, she must decide whether to let the visions dictate her choices in the present.

Cassandra: a tragic figure in Greek mythology who had the ability to foresee future dangers, but as she was cursed, no-one believed her warnings. The term “Cassandra complex” comes from this tale and is still a popular idiom today.

George Ding’s Cassandra takes this myth and spins it into an enthralling piece of dramatic sci-fi. Greece is replaced with near-future Bejing, and Cassandra the prophet is now Cassandra the corporation, offering young couples a glimpse of how their romance will likely unfold. And our lead characters are no heroes, but Xiaoyu and Yi, two people in Cassandra’s target demographic.

Like so many lovers, this duo don’t know if they’re ready to tie the knot and become one. But Amy, Xiaoyu’s dear friend and a newlywed, proclaims that Cassandra erased all her doubts about her boyfriend. In fact, Amy’s such a friend that she wants the same thing to happen to Xiaoyu and Yi.

So Xiaoyu gets booked in for an appointment with Cassandra by Amy. But that’s where the similarities end. Her glimpse doesn’t erase her doubts, it expands them. Worse still, the doubts are self-inflicted; her future behaviour sows the seeds for them, not Yi’s. And while she hints at what she sees to Yi, he doesn’t believe she’d do such a thing…or will she?

Will Xiaoyu accept Cassandra’s caution as the inevitable truth, or will she try to alter the course of the future through her actions in the present?

By combining an ancient legend with a futuristic yet believable setting, Cassandra provides a vision not just for couples, but for budding directors too. It predicts many award wins, but be quick – blink and this glimpse will end up belonging to someone else!

Pages: 22

Budget: Moderate. A few different scenes and settings – but despite this being SF, there’s no need for crazy FX!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: George Ding was born in Beijing and moved to the lush, yuppie suburbs of Washington D.C. at the age of four. He received a B.A. in Film Production with a minor in East Asian Languages and Cultures from the University of Southern California. After graduation, George took a two-month trip to Beijing and has lived there ever since.

He currently works as a freelance writer and filmmaker. His writing has appeared in VICEThe New York Times and The Washington Post.

Want to see more? Of course you do! Visit George at http://georgeding.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, July 11, 2016

Party Mom – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Party Mom
Being a Mom doesn’t mean you’re not cool.
…Or does it?

“I’m not a regular mom. I’m a cool mom,” purrs Amy Poehler’s Mrs. George in Mean Girls. This line comes right after she’s sufficiently stabbed Lindsey Lohan with her fake, extremely perky boobs and then told her teenage daughter (and friends) that there are no rules.

We’ve all known moms like that, right? A mom who still wants to be young, who can’t accept the age wrinkles written all over her face. You think that’s as bad as it gets?

Well, you’ve never met Party Mom.

Written by talented scribe David M Troop, Party Mom tells the story of one Mom’s quest to ensure that her daughter (Kayla) has the best tenth birthday possible at Chuck E. Cheese. Turns out, it’s a miracle the party is taking place there – due to various “mishaps”, Party Mom’s been banned from several local establishments; especially the “fun” and bouncy kind…

And this shin-dig is no exception. It doesn’t take long before all hell breaks loose and Party Mom is drunk, disheveled and dancing on Chuck E. Cheese himself.

That’s about when daughter Kayla snaps. She’s embarrassed of her mom (as any self respecting ten year old would be) and tired of her antics even more. Kayla demands her mom grow up and storms off to compose herself – leaving Party Mom to reflect on what she’s done.

What will Party Mom do? Will she stop drinking? Or agree to act her age?

Most importantly, will she ever be allowed in another Chuck E. Cheese? You’ll just have to read this script – and see!

Pages: 6

Characters: Party Mom, dad, daughter Kayla. Some extra kids and parents. Oh, and probably some security guards/Chuck E. Cheese staff.

Budget: Depends on what locations you select: anywhere from low, mid and high. An actual Chuck E. Cheese might cost a bit, although the setting could easily be shifted to a backyard if you have the right props. Regardless, a smart director could make this with friends and family for cheap and have a funny, touching meditation on what staying young really means.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus. Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced. Dave would like to make it three. Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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July 28, 2016

    Lyssa's Child by Steve Miles

    An expert in Multiple Personality Disorder interviews a disturbed recluse who claims to be the victim of a malign entity. 12 pages
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