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Friday, April 22, 2016

Speaking Test – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

SPEAKING TEST
Granted, Safeer’s English “not good”, but neither is his examiner.

The job interview has a long history with filmmakers. There’s terrific raw material to be mined especially in the comedy genre. Just take a look at Owen Wilson hamming it up in You, Me And Dupree, Monty Python’s skit The Lion Tamer with John Cleese and Michael Palin; Big Keith’s Appraisal in The Office, and Kevin Spacey’s turn in American Beauty – ‘would you like smiley-fries with that’?

In reality, job interviews are seldom easy and always challenging. Preparation is essential, as are nerves of steel. It’s essential to put your best foot forward. After all this is high-stakes stuff – this is your life, your future. More often than not you get one chance to make that all important first impression.

In Speaking Test, Manolis Froudarakis’ main character, Safeer, is determined to impress. A foreign national from an undisclosed country he has an extra challenge to overcome – English is evidently not his first language. Safeer’s applying for a job as a private investigator. He’s worked at the job successfully in his own country for the past four years. Now all he has to do is pass a test for ‘oral proficiency’ or rather, overcome the language barrier and convince the powers that be that he is indeed the man for the job.

This is no easy feat, especially when The Examiner is a man named Colton – a condescending, obnoxious, prejudiced and racist upstart who does little to disguise his disdain for Safeer by reacting to his test answers with a series of smirks, sneers and guffaws. He continues by stereotyping Safeer and ultimately rejecting his application.

SAFEER
(baffled)
My English good?

Colton laughs even harder. Safeer gulps.

SAFEER
Please, please! … Good detective is
important. Me, I search good, I
find many things.

COLTON
So you could find another
job, if necessary, right?

SAFEER
Other job?

COLTON
You know, like… in a restaurant…
(slowly, with exaggerated gestures)
Plates. Glasses. Water. You wash.

With those final words the interview is over and Safeer is shown the door. Little does Colton know however that by ignorantly equating Safeer’s broken English with stupidity he is the one who’s just made a big mistake. Safeer is nobody’s fool and he’s about to prove it by utilizing the very talents for which he’s just been passed over. Oh, such sweet irony.

Filmmakers: Want a cleverly plotted comedy with an equally powerful message? One that delivers with a terrific punchline guaranteed to have your audiences laughing in the aisles?

Well, don’t delay. Apply now! We predict this one will have applicants lined up around the block.

* We also recommend you read this imagining the role of Safeer being played by the late great Peter Sellers, the author’s inspiration for the character. Alternately, Sacha Baron Cohen would also do the trick. J

Budget: Minimal: yet more reason to interview and “hire” this one!

Pages: 5

About the reviewer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She has also worked professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She is thrilled her first ever entry (Simpatico) into a Screenplay Comp – The LA Comedy Festival ‘Short’ screenplay division took out Top 3 Finalist and hopes the high placing will be a continuing trend. Libby would love to see her words come to life on screen. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail

About the writer: Manolis Froudarakis has won two awards in short screenplay competitions. His main focus is comedy – preferably, comedy with a little edge. You can contact him at: mfroudarakis@yahoo.gr

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Tattooji – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by wonkavite

Tattooji
An abusive boyfriend gets his comeuppance when he has a new tattoo inked.

We’ve all seen them. Hell, most of us have been in them. Relationships that just make absolutely no sense. When you’re on the outside, it’s like watching a car wreck in slow motion. You’re there on the corner, watching them scream toward the center of the intersection from opposite directions. You know the outcome is going to be gruesome, but you can’t look away.

Screenwriter Anthony Cawood’s “Tattooji” is just such a screenplay, one readers (and soon, viewers) cannot look away from. He expertly gets us into the story late, after much of the damage has been done by 20-something Ben, who has a propensity for poor decisions and excessive drinking.

Ben’s excess is on full display as he exits a tattoo parlor and heads to the bar. It’s a brilliant intro quickly painting his shortcomings: usually the tattoo parlor comes AFTER you’ve had too much to drink. This guy’s such a mess, he doesn’t need booze to make bad choices.

After he gets on a good drunk, he makes an awful choice: arrives home bragging to his girlfriend about his new purchase.

BEN
… newest bloody thing they’d got.

He’s clearly drunk.

KAITLIN
Which is good?

BEN
Course, it’s fucking amazing.

Very drunk.

KAITLIN
And?

BEN
What?

KAITLIN
How much?

He reveals he paid 400 quid for the tattoo, which is a one-inch emoji that changes and becomes different emojis. His admission accelerates her anger and the tension quickly builds as she needles him for not only this decision, but many he’s made in their relationship. And the fact she’s not been able to treat herself to anything.

KAITLIN
I worked forty six hours this week,
taking shit from idiot punters for
every single minute of every hour.

BEN
But —

She pulls on her unkempt hair.

KAITLIN
Not had my hair done in six months.

BEN
Yeah —

KAITLIN
Or been out with my mates.

BEN
Me —

KAITLIN
Or had any type of treat, you whining little shit!

That gets Ben to his feet and the chase is on toward their violent ending. Again, you knew it wasn’t going to end well. And it doesn’t.

With a deft director guiding two strong and fearless actors, this short will definitely play well. And the extremely-limited budget (an apartment and a temporary emoji or five) will give all a smiley face – despite the eventual crash.

Pages: 6

Budget: Minimal. And a tiny amount of makeup (or animation done in post.)

About the reviewer: Zack Zupke is a writer in Los Angeles. Zack was a latch-key kid (insert “awww” here) whose best friend was a 19-inch color television (horrific, he knows). His early education (1st grade on) included watching countless hours of shows like “M*A*S*H,” “Star Trek” and “The Odd Couple” and movies like “The Godfather,” “Rocky” and “Annie Hall.” Flash forward to present day and his short “The Confession” was recently produced by Trident Technical College in Charleston, SC. He’s currently working on a futuristic hitman thriller with a partner and refining a dramedy pilot perfect for the likes of FX. You can reach Zack at zzupke “at” yahoo.

About the writer, Anthony Cawood: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Beacon Calling – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Beacon Calling
How far would you go to save humanity?

Ping.

Three world-worn wanderers walk wearily through a white winter wasteland. They are John, Noah, and Wilda, and their only guide is the small metal box with the flashing red light.

Ping.

Driven on by the incoming signal, our three explorers are obviously on an important and dangerous mission. Pausing briefly to appraise their situation, they discuss turning back. They are, after all, running low on supplies, and out there, somewhere in the darkness..someTHING is stalking them. Beaten both emotionally and physically, the three realize that there is no decision to be made: if they fail their mission, they’re all dead anyway.

Ping. Ping.

The signal is getting closer…but so is the creature! The group presses on, into the unknown. Where are they heading, and just what have they left behind? And WHAT is this creature!!

Are you getting a sense of the tension in this script? I hope so, because you may want to pop a Xanax before reading. Sled tracks, bloody footprints in the snow, a discarded iPod. The mystery deepens with each visceral image. And if it sounds like I’m being vague, don’t worry, it’s only because I don’t want to spoil the surprise ending.

Get ready for an eleven-minute panic attack, because Beacon Calling is a master class in suspense writing. A slow-build tense thriller filled with all the mystery and intensity of the best episodes of Lost, set in a Mad-Max-in-the-snow style wasteland (take note, George Miller!). This is one script guaranteed to keep your audience on edge, and keep them guessing until the shocking finale. They won’t know what hit them. Directors, come in from the cold and grow something sinister out of this script.

Ping. Ping. Ping!!!

Pages: 11

Budget: Low. Location may be tricky, since it is set in snow. But as long as your production doesn’t go all Revenant on you, costs are reasonable. (Plus, there IS a desert version of this available as well…!)

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple: put the coffee down, coffee is for closers. He is currently working on that screenplay everybody keeps talking about: The Wild Age. Contact him at dane.whipple (AT) live.com

About the Writer: Chris Keaton is an Air Force veteran living with his family in sunny Arizona. He’s primarily a screenwriter, but he does love diving into prose. He has had several short screenplays produced and go on to win awards. He’s optioned a few features screenplays and currently has a thriller feature in pre-production. A young-adult novel based on one of his screenplays is soon to be released. You can see some of his projects on his website, (www.Chris-Keaton.com) or follow him on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Chris-Keaton/456096811068609).

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Congratulations to Jason Allen – Lotsa Stuff Optioned and In Production! - posted by wonkavite

Please join the team at STS in congratulating Jason Allen for yet more optioned shorts!

Jason’s had quite a bit optioned through Shootin’ the Shorts. Though as much as we love hamming it up in the limelight, credit has to go PRECISELY where it’s due.  IE: to the writer whose mind, imagination and dedication to his craft has kept the hits a’ comin’ day by day.

As of now, the following productions are slated for April 2016, in amazingly varied locations:

The Painful Side of the Pillow – optioned by San Francisco-based Once Upon a Thyme Productions.

The Man From Everywhere – to be shot in NYC

I Swear – due to curse up a blue streak in Jolly ‘Ole England

Falcon Ridge – picked up for Indiana production

Feel the need to join the crowd?  Well, you should.  So check out these other scripts by Jason.  They’re still available… for now.

The Putt Putt Preacher – (Mockumentary) – For Father Mahoney, it’s not just a game…it’s an act of God. And, a religious calling has never been funnier. Just recently voted BEST short screenplay at the GA Milledgeville Film Festival!!

The Seashell (Comedy) – Don’t believe everything you hear. Even inside a seashell…

Madam Lucinda (Comedy)- A young man visits a psychic seeking knowledge about life. But are there hunchbacks, dungeons, transgenderism and werewolves in his future? And is that a bad – or a real good thing?

Jasper & Mimi Forever (Comedy) – The curious tale of Jasper and Mimi, two wild n’ crazy outcasts in love.

About the writer: Jason K. Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, Tennessee. His produced short scripts include AMERICAN SOCK, which won Best Screenplay at the 2014 San Diego Film Awards, and AUTUMN LOVERS, winner of the Audience Award at the 2013 Artlightenment Festival in Nashville. He also wrote the feature film LUCKY FRITZ starring Julia Dietze (IRON SKY) and Corey Feldman. Jason is also a wilderness guide, nature photographer, and published author. See IMDB for his complete credits: www.imdb.com/name/nm3021924

Monday, April 18, 2016

Eye for an Eye – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Eye for an Eye

Grieving parents get to decide the sentencing for the men convicted of their daughter’s brutal rape and murder

“Women worldwide ages 15 through 44 are more likely to die or be maimed because of male violence than because of cancer, malaria, war and traffic accidents combined,” Nicholas Kristof reported nearly three years ago in the New York Times. In recent years more than a thousand women are murdered by men each year in the United States. Acquittal of a likely suspect or sentencing that seems mild in comparison to the crime committed often provokes public outrage. Friends and family members struggle for closure: some seek peace through forgiveness, while others desperately strive for an end to their suffering as the perpetrators languish on death row.

J.E. Clarke’s latest Science Fiction (Minority Report influenced) work, Eye for an Eye, entertains the possibility that the public and a victim’s loved ones could actively participate in the sentencing of men found guilty of vicious violence and homicide. The film has Prosecutor Watson carefully summarizing the facts of the case during a sentencing hearing presided over by Judge O’Connor….via television monitors. Multiple screens flash simultaneously with images of the judge, the status of the proceeding, the crime scene and the public’s real time responses to the points raised by the lawyers, each one tallied through a thumbs up-thumb down counter.

The screen reveals: the filthy bus interior. Torn seats. Protruding springs. Blood spatters. Everywhere…

Watson uses her glove to scroll across the shot…”Lured inside, Ms. Morris was sexually assaulted for two hours. Beaten. Bitten. And worse.”

The lawyers tensely observe the counter as they plow through their arguments.

And then, the judge turns to the family members. What punishment would they choose for the criminals?

A fictional dramatization loosely based on the horrendous murder of Jyoti Singh, the work provides an alternative ending to the sentencing that enraged so many who are sickened by the continued violence against women. Audiences will be sure to engage so deeply with the proceedings portrayed in Eye for an Eye that when Judge O’Connor poses the question, viewers will find themselves aching for a chance to respond.

Pages: 7

Budget: Moderate. Will require a room with several screens as well as footage from the crime scene.

About the writer: Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has placed QF and SF for feature lengths in Page, and has two feature length films optioned for 2015/2016: limited location horror  “Containment.” and SF feature “Stream of Consciousness.” More of Ms. Clarke’s work can be read at www.philclarkejr.com/jec.html. Ms. Clarke can be reached directly at janetgoodman “at” yahoo.

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She has always loved to write, but only recently has begun to work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, April 15, 2016

Congratulations to Thorsten Loos – Wall in the Garden Optioned! - posted by wonkavite

Don’t you just love it when a plan comes together?  Oh – and when a lyrical script gets what it deserves – a director to bring it to the screen?

If so*, please join STS in congratulating Thorsten Loos for the recent optioning of his bitter-sweet script Wall in the Garden, to American producer Hafid Abdelmoula. Having already won placement in the Wildsound Festival Short Script ContestWall is due to start shooting in May 2016.  We promise, we’ll keep you apprised!

In the meantime – consider hitting up Thorsten… and see what OTHER SCRIPTS he has in store!

About the writer: A German writer, Thorsten Loos initially studied computer science and ran his own software development company for a living. These days, he primarily writes tales and scripts in the Science Fiction, Conspiracy and Paranormal genres. (Though he does drift into different genres with his shorts.) Thorsten’s currently working on episodes for a webseries called Unearthly, as well as character scripts for an international TV series in development for a U.S. based production company. His pilot script Project Endolon made it to the semi finals of the Creative World Awards2015, and his pilot Mindwalker won a live table read by actors at Wildsound Festival recently. Want to learn more? Then reach out to him at loos.thorsten “AT” web.de!

* And if not: who the heck are you – Scrooge?

Thursday, April 14, 2016

iRobot – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

I Robot

It’s Man Vs. Roomba when Octogenarian Roy receives a surprise present from his daughter

The ever widening dangers and potentials of technology. A common theme in both literature and film, the topic spans the gamut of genres. SF/Horror: Hal in 2001. Short Circuit (Comedy). Even Romance – Spike Jonze’s acclaimed SF film Her.

And cantankerous old people? No script writer can go wrong with that! Geezers aways make for colorful characters. Betty White in Lake Placid. The entire cast of Cocoon

Put those two factors into a short. Add a touch of dark humor, and the result is guaranteed to be memorable.

As iRobot opens, so does old man Roy’s door. Cranky and frail, he harasses the poor teen Postman relentlessly. He asks the kid a million questions. Insists on getting I.D. Eventually, Roy pulls the package from his hands. Slams the door in the kid’s face.

Back in his kitchen, Roy opens the box: it’s a surprise present from daughter Wendy. A fully automated Roomba style vaccuum cleaner; designed to help around the house. Though perpetually unimpressed, Roy turns the device on. He sets it down and gives it a spin.

…but the new-fangled gizmo does more than spin. It whirrs and clicks. And starts to clean. Mesmorized, Roy watches the bot “do its thing.” After conducting an initial patrol across the floor, the robot circles back – and slams into Roy’s ankle. Before you can yell “that tears it!” the war is on. A cat and mouse game ensues between Roy and his mechnanical nemesis. It may not be a Terminator, but this is one Roomba that’s ready to rock and roll. And not necessarily in a good way…

Easy to shoot, iRobot can be played several ways. Horror. Or tongue in cheek satire. But turn it on and give it your spin. It’s a fun tale of Man vs. Machine, with a lighthearted combination of genres.

About Anthony: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Pages: 10

Budget: Very low budget. Three actors and a roomba’s all you need.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Gravel Heart – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Gravel Heart
A devastated fourteen year old confronts the violent neighbor who killed his dog

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you read these two words: Old Yeller? Right, sadness, maybe anger. Maybe gas, depending on what you ate today.

The point is, everyone is familiar with the tragic story of Mr. Yeller and (almost 60 year old spoiler warning here) knows why he had to be put down.

But what if Old Yeller didn’t get rabies? What if, instead, he was killed by a stranger in a random act of violence? What would you do if someone killed your best friend?

That is the exact question that faces Tommy in the compelling drama Gravel Heart, written by talented scribe Michael Curtis.

And Tommy is no pushover. He grabs a shotgun and heads out to extract revenge on the man who took his best friend, a yellow mutt, away forever. And really – who can blame him?

What will Tommy ultimately decide? Will he indulge his darker side? Or learn that “an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind?”

Without giving anything away, Gravel Heart is a tragic story, but also a great meditation on pain, loss and how revenge will never fill the void… no matter how tempting it may be.

The wonderful thing about this script (besides the top notch writing) is how ideal it would be for an experienced director – especially if you partner with a young actor who likes to chew scenery.

Pages: 12

Budget: Moderate. A few actors – two animals – a couple of settings (gas station, home, another home with a garage). You may also want to save a little bit of the budget for effects/props. Or if you happen to have an old truck you don’t mind destroying, you’re set. However, if you happen to be a director who lives – or knows someone who lives – in the country and can find two homes ready for filming, you have most of the locations squared away.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts) offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts “AT” gmail and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer: Michael Curtis is a writer/director living in the Atlanta area. “Gravel Heart
is his first screenplay. IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm4950542/?ref_=pro_nm_visitcons (email mc “AT” edit lab DOT com.)

Accolades for “Gravel Heart:

WINNER – 2015 Best Short Screenplay – WILDsound Writer’s Festival, Toronto
WINNER – 2015 Script to Screen Competition – Sanford Int’l Film Festival
WINNER – 2nd Prize – 2015 Emerging Screenwriters Short Film Competition
WINNER – 2nd Prize – 2015 Reel Writers Screenwriting Competition
WINNER – Silver Prize – Hollywood Screenplay Contest 
Finalist – 2015 PAGE International Screenwriting Awards
Finalist – 2015 New York Screenplay Contest
Finalist – 2015 DC Shorts Film Festival Screenplay Competition
Finalist – 2015 Stowe Story Labs Screenwriting Fellowship
Finalist – 2015 Artists Alliance Short Screenplay Competition
Semi-Finalist – 2015 ScreenCraft Short Screenplay Competition
Official Selection – 2015 Manhattan Short Film Festival

EMAIL THE WRITER TO REQUEST THE SCRIPT: mc “AT” editlab DOT com

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Keeping it Fresh – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Keeping it Fresh
Ken and Ruth have done it all. Except this.

What are you willing to do to keep things fresh? That’s a question many couples in their 60s dare to ask, and Ken and Ruth do their best to answer.

Does Fresh mean honest? Or just exciting? And when the stakes are ‘whatever needs to be done to share one’s life’, how can a couple truly know?

As veteran writer Rick Hansberry’s script opens, we meet Ken and Ruth in their well worn family car; tersely discussing their “action plan.” Ruth’s awash with nerves – her hands playing with a folded piece of paper. Ken tries to be sensitive to her concerns, but fails miserably at every attempt.

Where is this duo going? And why?

Their destination – a grocery store. What on Earth could be nerve racking there?

Soon, we discover Ken and Ruth are in… a race. Of what kind? The truth’s unclear. But what unfolds next is a comedy of errors – a wondrous blend of anxiety and charm. Imagine the slapstick as Ken and Ruth dodge obstacles, friends, enemies, wet floors, and – of course – time.

What will the finish line reveal? We won’t spoil the surprise (or the produce). But you will find a warm, sophisticated comedy – ala a young June Squibb or Seymour Cassell.

This is a script with tons of buy-one-get-two-free.  Including: a budget friendly tale, featuring characters of a “specific” (and underrepresented) age. All of which makes this story stand out – and write it’s way into even old and jaded hearts.

Need some older actors? Consider giving your parents’ “cool” friends something to do for a day. But regardless of who you cast, you’ll charm your way into festivals with this Fresh, young-at-heart gem!

Budget: All that’s needed are two good actors, and access to a deli or supermarket – at least a few aisles.

Pages: 6

About the reviewer: Rachel Kate Miller is a veteran of the feature animation industry, having worked on several Oscar winning films, bringing stories to life. In 2012, she left animation to move to Chicago and run the design department for President Obama’s reelection campaign. She is now living in New York, writing, consulting on various projects and creating an educational animated series for elementary students focused on engaging kids in science.

About the Writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” His first feature is set to be released in the summer of 2014. Trailer available here . He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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