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Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Family Business – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by wonkavite

Family Business

In Mickey Dolan’s world, blood means you’re related. It doesn’t mean you’re family.

Family quarrels are bitter things. They dont go according to any rules. Theyre not like aches or wounds; theyre more like splits in the skin that wont heal because theres not enough material. – F. Scott Fitzgerald

As grizzly an image as it may be, a “split in the skin that won’t heal” is a woefully inadequate description of the family quarrel at the heart of Family Business, a short screenplay by Damien Michael Aulsberry.

Why? For starters, the “family business” in question is crime, and the head of the family, Jack, is a crime lord. A mobster. And like so many fathers, he’d be pleased if his son Mickey followed in his footsteps, but Mickey has no taste for the criminal life. He wants out.

So Jack calls on one of his hired guns, Liam, to talk sense into Mickey. And if that doesn’t work, the “skin splitting” starts. “If he feels the same way tomorrow,” Jack tells Liam, “I shit you not, put a bullet in his head.”

Problem is, Liam’s been around awhile and he feels like part of the family, too. “I’m not shooting you, Mickey,” he tells him. “We’re like family. Brothers.”

But Jack is not a man who takes no for an answer. “If you can’t,” Jack warns a reluctant Liam, “Eamon moves up, and he and Martin pay you a visit.” Eamon and Martin are Jack’s hit men — two that have no moral reservations about knocking off the boss’s son. And Liam, as a bonus.

Needless to say, Liam finds himself in a conundrum. “You’ve a fucked up family, Mickey,” he says, “and I’m caught in the middle of it.”

And it’s a problem for Mickey, too. So he takes the bull by the horns, so to speak.

They say, “You can choose your friends, but you can’t choose your family,” and that may be true. But they never say you can’t rearrange things a bit when the situation calls for it.

And another thing they say: “Like father, like son.”

Family Business is a great script. Screenwriter Damien Michael Aulsberry has a real winner here. It’s a fun story, which moves right along. The writing is terrific. Liam and Jack and Mickey and company are Irish, and the colloquial banter throughout make this a delightful read. It’ll be a really enjoyable movie, too. So grab this script while you can; and bring Jack, Mickey and Liam to technicolor life!

Budget: Low.

Pages: 13

About the reviewer: Helen Magellan (a pseudonym) is a successful screenwriter with several produced short scripts under her belt.

About the writer, Damien Michael Aulsberry: In Damien’s very personal words: “I write for therapeutic reasons. If I didn’t get all the mad shit out of me head, I’d be a lunatic…” What WE think is you’re a lunatic if you don’t give Damien’s work a read! That, and you can reach out to him directly at damien “AT” donovanprinting “DOT” com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Monday, August 17, 2015

The End in Sight – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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The End in Sight

A hired killer tries to finish one last job before going blind.

A bad guy with a soft spot – looking to do something right after a lifetime of mistakes…  What the heck is it about characters like this that captures the imagination?  Because they do. Every time.  They’re just so… more interesting than vanilla good guys. Screw Mark Hamill.  I’ll take Han Solo any day.  (And admit it…you would too.)  Hit men especially.  Watch the Professional or In Bruges, and dare to disagree.

The End in Sight is a short script that “hits” that exact note perfectly.  Enter Hugo – the consummate hit man.  He’s killed efficiently all his life. Now – unfortunately – he’s going blind.  Which, one could imagine, is really bad ju-ju for a man who relies on visual acuity…

Hugo’s trying to finish one last job before he retires: kill a gangster, and return a wayward prostitute, Winter, to a rival pimp named Skarda.  Needless to say – things get emotionally complicated and go horribly wrong.  Given the setup, this could have been a cliche script.  But The End in Sight does things right; pulling out twists and character beats that make the whole trip worthwhile. So if crime and thrillers are your forte, crack this one open. It’s got a killer ending…

About the writer: Breanne Mattson is no stranger to accolades.  Her feature lengths have made Nicholl Quarterfinalist three times (yeah, that’s three times, beeyotch!) She’s also made semi-finalist in Bluecat, Final Draft and honorable mention in TrackingB.  She’s also received a “worth the read” from Scriptshadow.  Her website can be viewed at www.breannemattson.com (IMDB credits here.)

Pages: 35

Budget: Okay. This one’s no “newbie” script.  Thirty five pages long, it features plenty o’ squibs and bullet hits,  stunt car driving, and both inside and outside locations.  But in experienced hands, this script could be amazing.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Original Script Sunday for August 16th - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are 19 original scripts for your reading pleasure.

-Don

Friday, August 14, 2015

El Paso Loco Luchadoras – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by wonkavite

El Paso Loco Luchadoras

When they impersonate a notorious female gang during a convenience store robbery, two wannabe crooks must face-off with the very legends they are trying to imitate.

When it comes to the world of professional Mexican wrestling, the question burns:

Real? Or fake?

Fans of that star struck industry love their entertainment – and their guilty pleasures. Known far and wide for their extravagant characters and costumes, professional wrestlers fascinate viewers with their physical prowess – and their theatrical performances as well.

In recent decades, Mexican wrestlers- Luchadores– have extended the dramatic quality of the sport to great heights. The most notable example was Super Barrio’s run for U.S. president in 1996, when he held mock rallies in the United States and Mexico. The Luchador’s persona became a real-life superhero candidate – complete with a genuine platform, and campaign.

In his pivotal crime-comedy El Paso Loco Luchadoras, CJ Walley celebrates the power of such larger than life identities… replete with a female centric Pulp Fiction bent.

The protagonists of our story: Felix and Maria. Down and desperate for cash, we meet the two young women as they set out to rob a store. Rank amateurs in the world of crime, the two impersonate a gang of female wrestler thieves – a notorious band of bandits known as Los Locas Luchadoras. But when the real Luchadora’s show up, the duo’s fumbling plans are doomed to fail. Stitched together by CJ Walley’s masterful narrative skills, El Paso evolves into a dance of identity and role reversals; girrrrrl power  chemistry and comedy melt into Walley’s subtle story-telling blend – leaving the audience in stitches!

Are you a fan of Quentin Tarantino? And what about comic crime narrative – imbued with feminist poetic justice? Than grab onto El Paso with a flying headlock. Don’t let this dramatic gem slip away!

Number of Pages: 7

Budget: Low to medium. The main cost will be the luchadora costumes for 6 actors.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She recently has begun work on two screenplays.

About the writer: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write new specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producers, directors, and actors in LA, NYC, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington DC, Zurich, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Dallas while occasionally blogging for Stage 32.  If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Congratulations to Dustin Bowcott – Evicted Optioned!! - posted by wonkavite

Recently, STS ran a review of Evicted – a short n’ gritty crime ditty penned by Dustin Bowcott.

We’re happy to announce Evicted‘s already found a home – optioned to LA based producer Glyn Turner. Please join us in congratulating Dustin!

And for those directors who lost out, hear us out – there’s more where that came from.  For instance, this sweet/nostalgic SF tale:

Time for Love An elderly lady discovers an old flame in her shed

Check it out for your next project, while you can!

About the writer: Dustin Bowcott is a self employed microbe retailer and father of four boys. He has enjoyed writing since the day he read his first novel. For Dustin, writing is something he has to do, when not writing, he’s thinking about writing and will absorb himself into multiple projects at one time. When he gets tired of writing one thing he moves onto another and has been known to work on three different stories in one day, writing for sometimes 12 hours straight and, on occasion, even longer. Dustin can turn his hand to any genre and has just finished first draft of a new children’s novel. Dustin is a BBC Writer’s Room finalist and a Shore Scripts finalist both in 2014. He is a produced and optioned writer, and has recently turned his hand to production, having produced his first short film with another in the pipeline that should be completed this year. Want to see what else he has in store? Give him a shout-out at dustin7375 “AT” gmail.

 

 

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Quality Control – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Quality Control

A clone has to prove to an observer that he deserves a second chance in order to avoid incineration.

Science Fiction – it’s such a complicated bag, full of staggering subcategories. Fantasy swordplay ala Star Wars. Swash-buckling action via Guardians of the Galaxy.

But the analysis of social conflicts – that’s what makes SF special. Ask any hardcore Science Fiction fan – the true beauty of the genre is the ability to examine hard-hitting social issues – spotlit by futuristic light. Along with the pleasures of Star Trek, are true classics such as these:

Soylent Green -a police detective discovers the government’s secret ingredient, designed to feed a world ravaged by the greenhouse effect, and overpopulation.

Planet of the Apes – an astronaut crash lands on a mysterious planet dominated by primates – the theory of evolution turned upside down.

Minority Report – Tom Cruise solves homicides via a special police unit – who negate the concept of free will, and arrest murderers before they commit crimes.

Then there’s screenwriter Ammar Salmi’s Quality Control – depicting a futuristic society where clones are routinely grown – almost like slaves. At least, if they’re allowed to live…

Witness if you will, Clone 36. A “man” who’s been accused of a crime. Confined to a cell, and deemed chattel, our protagonist’s future dangles in the hands of Dave – a faceless pencil-pusher who would rather terminate the offending Clone… just to save himself needless paperwork.

As the script opens, the three hour observation breezes by. Will Clone 36 convince Dave of his innocence? Or suffer an animal’s brutal fate?

Heavy on the drama, but feather light on FX, Quality Control is limited location – and a sterling choice for directors with an intelligent bent. Like the best of breed in SF, QC is a thought provoking treatise about the dangers of the legal system. And the potential violation of human rights.

Pages: 5

Budget:  Low.  One special effect done in post: overlays of charts and data on screen.

About the Guest Reviewer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

About the Author: Born and raised in Bir El Ater, Algeria, Ammar Salmi majored in computer science at USTHB university. He found interest in screenwriting when he was 19 – falling in love with it only two years after reading “The usual suspect” script. Ever since, he’s been learning, reading, and writing (his words). Though not produced yet, Ammar’s gearing up for his first feature, and can’t wait to see what the writing future has in store!  Interested in QC? Reach out to Ammar via realxwriter “AT” gmail. 

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Claustrophobia – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Claustrophobia

Sometimes, MRIs look deeper than the flesh…

The definition of Claustrophobia – “extreme or irrational fear of confined places.”

Chris Sparling’s excellent Buried has deservedly ruled as the king of contained thrillers since it first hit our screens back in 2010. Well, it looks like its glorious reign is about to come to an end… thanks to this recent horror submission by J. E. Clarke. A terrifying little tale entitled Claustrophobia – With Contrast.

It’s erstwhile protagonist: long-suffering, neurotic Lori – a migraine sufferer forced to undergo an MRI scan to determine the cause of all those blasted headaches. Even at best, MRIs aren’t exactly a walk in the park. Especially when one is claustrophobic!

Horrified at the prospect of remaining perfectly still for thirty minutes, Lori is forced to take a sedative – and packed into the “metallic coffin” tighter than a sardine in a tin can. And things are about to get far worse. Already disoriented and terrified, Lori’s world turns upside when she overhears the two techs – Mike and Sarah – discussing how it’s taken several days to clean the machine. Why? Because the last female patient died on the table – the victim of a massive brain haemorrhage….

Strapped in and groggy, Lori struggles to respond. Just as a strange voice hisses in her ear. Then the visions begin – the spectre of a blood drenched woman, reflected in the glass pane inches from Lori’s face. Lori twitches her big toe to raise the alarm, but finds herself ignored – trapped like a rat to her dismay.

Will Mike and Sarah pick up on Lori’s signals of SOS? And are the drugged woman’s visual disturbances a side effect of medication or real – a terrifying glimpse of her soon-to-be grisly fate?

Horror directors – take note. Claustrophobia is chock full of great visuals. A high-concept script packed with tension and suspense!

Pages: 6

Budget: Low. Access to an MRI machine (or some facsimile thereof). Four very talented actors and cinematographer. That – and buckets of fake blood!!

About the Reviewer: Gary Rowlands is a produced and published writer. His contained horror Offline was the ‘featured script of the month’ in March and has since been optioned. He is seeking representation and can be contacted at gazrow at hotmail dot com

About the writer: Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has placed QF and SF for feature lengths in Page, and has two feature length films optioned for 2015/2016: limited location horror  “Containment.” and SF feature “Stream of Consciousness.” More of Ms. Clarke’s work can be read at www.philclarkejr.com/jec.html. She can be reached at janetgoodman “AT” yahoo.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

Sunday, August 9, 2015

Original Script Sunday for August 9th - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are twenty two original scripts for our reading pleasure.

– Don

Friday, August 7, 2015

Baby Steps – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Baby Steps

You never forget the first time you fall in love – even if you were in diapers.

Okay, we’ll admit that talking baby scripts aren’t always the best thing since sliced bread.  Case in point: the Look Who’s Talking Series, from One through…well, whenever they decided to finally stop torturing the movie going public.  Honestly – after the first fifteen rounds, baby poop jokes get kinda…stale.  To put it mildly.  (Even if poop itself continues to be funny to those of us with a case of arrested development.)

But occasionally, a script comes along that proves the exception to the rule.  A script with a gentle sense of humor, and heart.  Baby Steps is that exception.

This short follows the story of Millie and Hank – two babies that meet cute one day in the park; only to have their chance encounter and hopes dashed to smithereens when their mothers roll them away.  Their baby hearts are broken – never to meet again.  Or will they?  (Cue the dramatic music here.)

Folks, this one’s an honestly cute and intelligent romance.  Not to mention an easy shoot – baby wrangling and spit-up aside.  Give this short a shot… and make your audience feel young at heart.

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

Pages: 9

Budget: Very low.  Well, with the exception of dealing with baby actors.  Unless your friends have a few that can be borrowed…

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

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