SimplyScripts.com - Read Movie Scripts Online

Friday, October 31, 2014

Notes from a Veteran Writer – “Will You Read My Script?” (P.J. McNeill) - posted by wonkavite

“Will you read my script?”

A few years back, Josh Olson, the screenwriter of A History of Violence, wrote a scathing piece for the Village Voice titled “I Will Not Read Your Fucking Script”. It was a complex piece with a subtle thesis: I will not read your fucking script. Needless to say, it made waves within the screenwriting community and generated a lot of discussion. Some people thought Olson was a dick (::raises hand::) and some people thought the guy had a point. To be more specific, I did think he had a point, but that doesn’t change the fact that he was being a dick doing it.

What the article failed to acknowledge is that, as budding young screenwriters, there is A LOT of pressure put on us to hustle our scripts. When I first moved out to Los Angeles, I immediately gained a connection to a VERY successful screenwriter. I used that connection simply to chat the guy up, ask a few questions and enjoy the rare chance to talk to a professional writer. Later on, I had coffee with a young producer, who chastised me for not pushing my latest script on him. I told her that I didn’t think it was right to push my script on such a tenuous connection, but she pushed and argued to the point where I came around to the idea. That night, I contacted the screenwriter and asked him if he would read my script. I never heard back. I immediately felt very stupid for doing it, and to this day, regret severing that connection with such a request. I acted as if the guy owed me something…as if I was the ONLY person who had ever met him, and then – within a week – asked him to read something. I treated him like an opportunity, not a person.

It doesn’t help that this is how it’s done. In my very first blog post, I wrote about a guy I knew who gave his script to someone and then watched it get passed around like wildfire, only to end up in the hands of a Sony executive, who then bought it. When you hear a story like this, you can’t help but want to share it with everyone you see. Any person could be your big break. And really, what other option do we have? We have connections or we have cold calling/querying.

I think the problem is two-fold, and it’s on both sides of the equation. First, the person you’re giving the script to: odds are they’re a professional, and doing much better than you. They’re most likely so far gone from the time when they were an amateur, that they don’t remember what it’s like. And most importantly: they don’t HAVE to remember. That part is over for them. Also, a lot of them develop a kind of “I had to claw my way to the top, so you do too” kind of attitude. They forget that, in almost every case, their success was probably achieved by someone doing them a favor. But like I said, they don’t have to think about that anymore.

The other side of the equation is you. The obvious part of your side of the equation is that you probably don’t realize just how many people ask them to read their screenplays. The not so obvious part of the equation is the dream. What is the dream? It’s that nagging little feeling in the back of your head that this – will – be – it. You’re going to give them your screenplay, and they’re going to like it so much, they’re going to pass it to their agent, a producer, an executive, whoever. You may give it to them under the guise that you want “feedback” or you “just want to know what they think of it”, but we all know what you really want. I’ve done it too. You want praise. You want success. You don’t want to hear what’s wrong with it. I’ve had many people ask me to read their screenplays under this guise, and get REALLY PISSED (or break off communication entirely) when I’m mildly critical of it. So you – the screenwriter – must come to terms with what you’re asking for. Because the person you’re giving it to sure as hell knows.

Giving your screenplay to people is a MUST in this industry. It has to be done. But like I’ve always said, it’s better if you treat the person you’re giving it to AS A PERSON, not an opportunity. Be real with them. Don’t hide your intentions under something you don’t really want. And most importantly, if you see Josh Olson, ask him to read your screenplay. Because seriously, fuck that guy.

About the writer: A talented writer and 10 year veteran of the industry, “P.J. McNeill” has seen it all (and he’s ready to kiss and tell.) Got a question, a comment or just general bile /praise you want to spew?  Email PJ at pjscriptblog@gmail.com.

 

Thursday, October 30, 2014

The Midnight Meat Train screenplay - posted by Don

The Midnight Meat Train – Undated, unspecified draft script by Jeff Buhler (based on Clive Barker’s short story “The Midnight Meat Train” – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

The photographer Leon lives with his girlfriend and waitress Maya waiting for a chance to get in the photo business. When Maya contacts their friend Jurgis, he schedules a meeting for Leon with the successful owner of arts gallery Susan Hoff; she analyzes Leon’s work and asks him to improve the quality of his photos. During the night, the upset Leon decides to wander on the streets taking pictures with his camera, and he follows three punks down to the subway station; when the gang attacks a young woman, Leon defends her and the guys move on. On the next morning, Leon discovers that the woman is missing.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Let Me In screenplay - posted by Don

Let Me In – February 2, 2009 first draft script by Matt Reeves (based on the novel by John Ajvide Lindqvist) – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

A twelve year-old Owen is a lonely and outcast boy bullied in school by Kenny and two other classmates; at home, Owen dreams of avenging himself against the trio of bullies. He befriends his twelve-year-old next door neighbor, Abby, who only appears during the night in the playground of their building. Meanwhile, Abby’s father is a wanted serial-killer who drains the blood of his victims to supply Abby, who is actually an ancient vampire.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

The Twilight Saga: Eclipse - posted by Don

The Twilight Saga: Eclipse – July 14, 2009 blue draft script by Melissa Rosenberg – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

Bella once again finds herself surrounded by danger as Seattle is ravaged by a string of mysterious killings and a malicious vampire continues her quest for revenge. In the midst of it all, she is forced to choose between her love for Edward and her friendship with Jacob — knowing that her decision has the potential to ignite the struggle between vampire and werewolf. With her graduation quickly approaching, Bella is confronted with the most important decision of her life.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Monday, October 27, 2014

Oblivion screenplay - posted by Don

Oblivion – March 27, 2011 draft script by William Monahan (current revisions by Karl Gajdusek (based on the story by Koseph Kosinski)) – hosted by: SciFiScripts – in pdf format

One of the few remaining drone repairmen assigned to Earth, its surface devastated after decades of war with the alien Scavs, discovers a crashed spacecraft with contents that bring into question everything he believed about the war, and may even put the fate of mankind in his hands.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Annabelle screenplay – - posted by Don

The final lap for October One Week Writing Challenge. Scripts are due by 11:59 pm edt tonight!

Annabelle – October 7, 2013 unspecified draft script by Gary Dauberman – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

A couple begin to experience terrifying supernatural occurrences involving a vintage doll shortly after their home is invaded by satanic cultists.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

The Last House On The Left screenplay - posted by Don

More inspiration for the October One Week Writing Challenge. Two days left to write.

The Last House on the Left – Undated, unspecified draft script by Mark Haslett (revisions by Adam Alleca, current revisions by Carl Ellsworth) (based on the film by Wes craven) – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

After kidnapping and brutally assaulting two young women, a gang unknowingly finds refuge at a vacation home belonging to the parents of one of the victims: a mother and father who devise an increasingly gruesome series of revenge tactics.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Black Christmas screenplay - posted by Don

More inspiration for the October One Week Writing Challenge. Three days left to write.

Black Christmas – October 19, 2005 numbered draft script by Glen Morgan (based on the film “Black Christmas” directed by Bob Clark and written by Rob Moore) – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

An escaped maniac returns to his childhood home on Christmas Eve, which is now a sorority house, and begins to murder the sorority sisters one by one.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Candyman screenplay - posted by Don

More inspiration for the October One Week Writing Challenge. Four day left to write.

-Don

Candyman – August 1991 ‘corrected’ draft script by Bernard Rose (based on Clive Barker’s The Forbidden) – hosted by: Horrorlair – in pdf format

Helen Lyle is a student who decides to write a thesis about local legends and myths. She visits a part of the town, where she learns about the legend of the Candyman, a one-armed man who appears when you say his name five times, in front of a mirror. Of course, Helen doesn’t believe all this stuff, but the people of the area are really afraid. When she ignores their warnings and begins her investigation in the places that he is rumored to appear, a series of horrible murders begins. Could the legend be true?

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More scripts, horror and otherwise, on the Movie Scripts page.

Search with Google

    Google
    Web SimplyScripts

The October One Week Challenge is on!

Award Season Screenplays

Featured SimplyScripts Blogs


ScriptSearch

Advertisement

More Navigation

Latest Entries

Categories

Script of the Day
October 31, 2014

Award Season Screenplays

Advertisement

Donate

Advertisement



Writers I dig

Advertisement

Search Amazon

Search Sheet Music

Search All Posters

SimplyScripts Newsletter

    Subscribe to the SimplyScripts Newsletter