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Monday, July 21, 2014

Adventureland screenplay - posted by Don

Adventureland - August 5, 2007 Revised Draft script by Greg Mottola – hosted by: Daily Script – in pdf format

In 1987, James Brennan’s dreams of a summer European tour before studying at an Ivy League school in New York City are ruined after his parents have a severe career setback. As a result, James must get a summer job to cover his upcoming expenses at the decrepit local amusement park, Adventureland, where he falls in love with a witty co-worker, Emily Lewin. In that bizarrely shady workplace, the young carnies have unforgettable and painful learning experiences about life, love and trust while James discovers what he truly values.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

Find this and more scripts over on the Movie Scripts page.

Stowaway – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Stowaway

Anne Boleyn has escaped the Tower of London and seeks safe passage out of England. With the help of a young fishmonger, can she evade capture by Charles Brandon? A man determined not to fail his king…

Historical scripts – they’re such a tricky thing. A lot of history is downright dull. And when the wrong subject is chosen (or executed incorrectly), the result can be a cinematic nightmare… or an exposition laden snorefest.

And yet, historical scripts have such potential. To entertain. To educate. To bring a deceased culture and time back to living, breathing life.

When done correctly, such scripts look a lot like Stowaway.

Set in London 1536, Stowaway imagines a scenario where Anne Boleyn evaded the executioner’s ax. Hidden away in a warehouse, she awaits word from Henry Percy – who seeks to secure his love safe passage to Denmark on a ship. But the clock is ticking. For Duke Charles Brandon is on the hunt. Aware of Anne’s escape, he prowls the fish market, bribing everyone he meets for clues. One of the commoners he approaches is young fishmonger Bryce. And when Bryce discovers Anne’s whereabouts, he knows he has a grave decision to make…

In the masterful hands of writer Elaine Clayton, Stowaway brings 1536 England to vivid life. Reading the script, one sees the olde-world laid out before them, and can almost smell the fish market (a good or bad thing, depending on one’s point of view.) Read this script, and you’ll find yourself caring for the characters – and wanting to know more about them. Several centuries after the real life versions have turned to dust, that’s a remarkable writing feat.

Expertly written, Stowaway is a historical gem. One that deserves to be produced in full glory.

About the writer: Elaine Clayton is a London-based screenwriter, who has written several well-received shorts and is currently working on her first feature length scripts. Comfortable in a broad range of genres, Elaine has an innate sense of structure and arc development. Contact her at Elaine_clayton (AT) Hotmail(.)co(.)uk

Pages: 6

Budget: Ok. Let’s talk budget. Settings include a fisherman’s wharf and several secondary locations. And everything needs to look authentic. Period clothing would be required for the four main characters, and a number of extras. Needless to say, this is one script that couldn’t be done on a shoestring. And yet… such requirements aren’t insurmountable. For instance, the script describes a ship. But do we really need to see it in the water? Or would a shot of the ramp suffice? For a creative director with a decent budget… this script could still be shot as a work of art.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Lookin’ for a few good scripts and writers! - posted by wonkavite

Yeah, STS is on a roll…

A little over four months since the site went live, we’re thrilled to say our reviews have helped five writers get their short scripts optioned, as well as facilitating several indie director/writer connections.

But… we need your help, in two very important areas:

Give us some damn’ good scripts!

A site is only as great as its content.  So we need good scripts to review.  Lots o’ them.  Tons of them.  Short and feature length.  We wanna drown in (good) scripts like it’s a mega-budget producer’s slush pile. Our mission statement at STS is to find the best, highest quality short (and feature length) scripts for review.  So if you have a gem that’s really ready for prime time (or have someone you want to recommend), check out the link below for submissions. (Don’t forget to include a URL link to your script!)

http://simplyscripts.com/submit_your_script-sts.html

Give us a few damn’ good writers!

In the next month or so, STS will be expanding to include feature length reviews.  And that’s when even more fun’s gonna start!  But that’s a ton of readin’ and reviewin’, so we’re gonna need a bit of help.  In addition to script showcasing, STS also features occasional interviews with indie directors and industry related book reviews.  If you feel you’ve got a knack for any of those three writing areas – and want to contribute – send us a sample of your work for consideration using the URL listed above.  No, it’s not paid.  But you’ll get credit for your article and press.  And in this biz, that’s a pretty good thing….

Friday, July 18, 2014

And THIS is what happens to Veteran Writers… (PJ McNeill in the Trenches) - posted by wonkavite

…they end up working on scripts – not to mention juggling a complicated home move.

Due to a looming deadline, P.J. regrets to inform STS’s faithful that he’ll be on vacation for a month – coming up for air on August 15th.  Until then, we promise to keep you fed with a bonus script review on Fridays  So make sure to tune in, anyway!

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Love Locked – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Love Locked

Two teenagers discover romantically painted padlocks on a bridge. Are they Valentines from a love-struck Romeo… or something more sinister?

Mystery is a terrific engine for driving a story; the history of cinema has proven that time and again – from the appearance of the Monolith in 2001 to Who Killed Laura Palmer in Twin Peaks. The existence of a question mark in your script will keep audiences on the edge of their seats – no matter your chosen genre.

In the case of Love Locked, the genre is horror. And the mysterious objects: a series of padlocks found on a bridge by teenagers Susie and Sam. It’s Susie who discovers the first one; a lock painted in red with initials – PC hearts KS. A cute romantic gesture. Over the next several weeks, the couple finds even more – each with PC… and someone else. Who is PC? And why is he (or she) so fickle? Susie decides to find out – but will she get more than she bargained for?

Love Locked is perfect for horror directors on a budget – a fresh little tale that ends with a bang.

About the writer: Anthony Cawood is an aspiring screenwriter from the UK with a number of scripts in various stages of production, two of which have just wrapped shooting. His script, A Certain Romance, recently won in the Nashville Film Festival Screenwriting Competition (short script category). You can find out more at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Pages: 10

Budget: Pretty cheap. A few outside shots, and only two main characters!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Confession – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Confession

A conflicted man struggles with truth and consequences.

There are certain requirements of screenwriting. Create interesting, empathetic characters. Give them a dilemma they have to escape. Tell your tale in chronological order…

Actually, ever since Pulp Fiction, that last rule has sort of fallen by the wayside. Sometimes, starting with the point that everything explodes is the absolute best thing to do with a story. Then work backward – leaving your viewers dying to know how your characters got there.

Confession is a solid example of a script that does just that – while keeping the interest and urgency of intact.

True to its title, Confession opens with protagonist Jake in a confessional booth, about to speak to a priest. Dressed in a torn sports coat, Jake’s nervous and bloody. Stricken with a sudden change of heart, Jake flees before unburdening his sins… to himself (or the audience.) What follows next are the steps that brought Jake to his knees – literally. The crime, the sin. The small life decisions that ultimately add up to consquences greater than its sum.

Make no mistake. There’s action in this script. But at its heart, Confessions is a character study… one that an indie director could sink their teeth into; no matter which direction this story’s told.

About the writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” His first feature is set to be released in the summer of 2014. Trailer available here .  He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

Pages: 6

Budget: Relatively low. A handful of sets (including, of course, a confessional booth.) There is one action scene that requires a bit of stunt work. But nothing budgetarily crazy.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sunday, July 6, 2014

Original script Sunday and the beginning of a 7 week challenge - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are nineteen original scripts.

And we are one week and ten pages into a seven week challenge wherein our writers are working on a race against the clock thriller with a male protagonist in his fifties. You can check them out here.

Friday, July 4, 2014

PJ McNeill’s busy with family and fireworks (but he still wants to hear from you!) - posted by wonkavite

Due to the 4th of July celebrations, P.J. McNeill will be taking a break from his regularly scheduled column.  But worry not; he’ll be back with fresh material next week.

In the meantime, he’s asked STS to encourage readers to email him with questions, comments and observations at pjscriptblog@gmail.com.  Who knows?  The insights that you bring up just might inspire the next article (or series of articles) he writes!!

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Family Trip – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

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Family Trip

A poor Texas family loads up their camping gear for a weekend trip, but one of them will not be returning.

When it comes to political controversies, there are few as emotionally volatile as abortion. And that’s not surprising. Where one stands on abortion strikes right at the heart of one’s fundamental values (religious or secular). At what point in fetal growth does personhood and rights begin?   And once they do – how to balance the rights of a developing human against those of the woman who must carry it? It’s a diversive issue – driven by deep philosophical and political beliefs.

But when it comes to the actual procedure, the reality is far from abstract. Regardless of one’s decision, the impact of abortion is intensely personal. For the woman – and often her family.

Family Trip focuses on that aspect – following the Heron family as they travel out of town… ostensibly for a camping trip. Going along for the ride are Wendy, Hank and their fifteen year old daughter, Carrie. Despite the camping gear piled on top of the car, it quickly becomes clear that the Herons aren’t heading to the woods. As the appointment and the clinic nears, FT handles a number of potentially inflammatory scenes with remarkable subtlety: discussion of possible protestors. The legal requirement in Texas for the doctor to show Carrie an ultrasound of the fetus. Eschewing overly-dramatic scenes, writer Eric Wall instead uses touches of dialogue and small details to do something far more impressive: create a three dimensional view of a family that clearly loves each other; bonding together during a difficult time in their lives.

Thoughtfully written (and devoid of grandstanding), FT is likely to act as a Rorsach test for its readers – the message differing depending on how one interprets it. But regardless of one’ s personal stance on abortion – this is one script that deserves to be part of the discussion.

About the writer: I’ve been writing screenplays for over ten years. For most of that time I considered it a hobby, but I decided to make a serious go of it a little over a year ago. Since then I’ve written several short scripts and one feature, with another feature nearing completion. Despite occasional inquiries, I have not been optioned, but I’m hoping that changes in 2014.

Pages: 17

Budget: Reasonable. There are a variety of settings: the car, the clinic, a diner. Probably best not done on a shoestring… but nothing exorbitant, either. The main requirement: get solid actors that can handle subtle dialog and context.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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