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Monday, October 1, 2018

Cyborn by Mark Renshaw – Produced – Graphic Short - post author Don

Cyborn (3 pages in pdf format) by Mark Renshaw

An android uses a pair of dice to help him choose random memories to relive as his power supply runs out.

This was one of the entries in the Quickie Challenge . Hyper Epics liked the idea and it was re-written by Thomas Tuna and illustrated by Armand Roy Canias.

(click the image to take you to the full version).


Read the rest at HyperEpics.com/Cyborn


About the Writer: 2018 Page Awards semi-finalist Mark Renshaw can be reached through his website at Mark-Renshaw.com. An award-winning writer and producer, his last project earned ‘Best Sci-Fi’ at the Top Shorts and Festigious film festivals.

About Hyper Epics: Home of the 3 page sagas, Hyper Epics is a bold anthology series that offers diverse and exciting comic book stories on its website – www.hyperepics.com – and in print form. Each original story is packed with stunning artwork, memorable characters, and captivating stories enhanced with dazzling soundtracks. It is quickly becoming a go-to destination for readers worldwide.

Monday, September 24, 2018

Tunnel Rat by John Staats – Produced! - post author Don

Tunnel Rat (5 page short screenplay in pdf format) by John Staats

A US Marine encounters unexpected perils as he clears an enemy tunnel.

This was one of the entries in the July Summer Heat/Cold Weather One Week Challenge. John re-wrote Tunnel Rat into comic format and submitted it to Hyper Epics who liked it and together they pitched it to an illustrator, and, one month later… (click the image to take you to the full version).



Please visit HyperEpics.com/Tunnel-Rat for the rest of the story.


About the writer: As a fly-fishing fanatic and skier living in the Arizona desert, John Staats has plenty of time for writing. After focusing on features and shorts for the screen, John has now ventured into writing for the illustrated page with hopes of eventually writing a full-feature graphic novel. His feature Impasse has also been published as an e-book on Amazon. John can be contacted at jestaats(a)hotmail.

About the letterer: Jaymes Reed is an comic book letterer. Check out his site Digital-Caps.com and follow him on Twitter at @DigitalCAPS

About the artist: Sean Bova is an artist. Check out his website at: Sean-Bova.Squarespace.com

About Hyper Epics: Home of the 3 page sagas, Hyper Epics is a bold anthology series that offers diverse and exciting comic book stories on its website – www.hyperepics.com – and in print form. Each original story is packed with stunning artwork, memorable characters, and captivating stories enhanced with dazzling soundtracks. It is quickly becoming a go-to destination for readers worldwide.


Talk about it on the discussion board.

Monday, September 17, 2018

Zombie Romance by Oksana Shafetova – short script review (available for production) - post author LC

Zombie Romance by Oksana Shafetova

On the eve of a zombie apocalypse a young wife has to make a life or death choice in the name of love.

You’d be forgiven for thinking the horror staple of Zombies has reached saturation point and that our appetite and continuing hunger for the lumbering, rampaging, bloodthirsty undead has waned.

Future Box Office however, tells a different story.

There are some twenty Zombie horror flicks already slated for 2018/19 with titles such as The Cured, Little Monsters, Cargo, Patient Zero, An Accidental Zombie (Named Ted), Breathers, and Inherit The Earth, to name just some of the titles already released or awaiting release. These movies have big-name stars attached: Lupita Nyong’o, Ellen Page, Martin Freeman, Stanley Tucci, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt. Brad Pitt is returning in the sequel to World War Z 2, and the original cast of Woody Harrelson, Emma Stone and Jesse Eisennberg make their return in Zombieland 2.

Chances are if you’re reading this blog you fancy yourself as the next George Romero, Jennifer Kent, Mike Flanagan, Julia Ducournau, or James Wan. You want to make a short film with maximum impact, which means you need good material with broad audience appeal.

Want something with a little horror, a little romance, and a good dose of humour? Not to mention blood, gore, and a decent dose of foreboding and suspense? Oksana Shafetova’s, Zombie Romance, has all these ingredients and more.

We open on Barbara, a young woman lying on a bed in a darkened room. Anyone who’s ever suffered a migraine knows the benefits of quiet and darkness. Only trouble is there’s some weird screaming and carrying on going on outside Barbara’s bedroom window. Rest and recuperation is not going according to plan.

We hear the fumbling of the key in the lock of the front door. Thank God, her loving husband Harry, is home. He can take Max, the dog, out for a walk. He might even be able to explain the weird auditory hallucinations Barbara is hearing from outside.

Maybe it’s all in her head.
Or maybe it isn’t…

One thing’s for sure. The words: ‘for better or worse’ and ‘in sickness and health’, are just about to be sorely tested.

Filmmakers: Zombie Romance is a killer script. One you’ll be dying to get your hands on. There’ll be a lot of clamouring for this one, so best set yourself apart from the hordes and get on it fast.

Contained Horror. One location, two leads, a mutt, minimal SFX, Zombie makeup… And you’re set to go.

About the Writer: Oksana Shafetova has always been fascinated with storytelling, but discovered her inner voice only a couple years ago. Graduated as an editor, she has worked in the fields of journalism and video game narrative, until she finally found her true passion in script writing. Oksana gets inspiration from cinematography, and empathizes with an audience to think up riveting plot twists in her own works. She currently lives with her husband, an illustrator, in Dusseldorf, Germany. SHe can be reached at: oshafetova (a) gmail.com

Read Zombie Romance (4 pages in pdf format)

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: L. Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Creak and Shriek by Rob Herzog – Short Script Review (available) - post author Steve Miles

Creak and Shriek (8 pages in pdf format) by Rob Herzog

An eight-year-old boy struggles for answers when his horror sound effects record starts playing on its own in the middle of the night.

Today is a very special day: today is Noah’s 8th birthday.

Only the party didn’t quite go to plan.  No one showed – no one all that important anyway.  Mom’s taken it personally.  Not that she needed much of an excuse to get a head start on her nightly tipple.  Despite it all, Noah’s holding up, distracted by his brand new ‘Scary Sounds of the Night’ recording.

It’s an odd gift, but by all accounts Auntie W. lives far from normality.  She’s the distant kind of aunt that talks to skunks and lives alone in the woods.  The kind that always forgets a birthday… until now.

            MOM (O.S.)
Gonna give yourself nightmares, kid.

     A heart beats on the sound effects record: lub-dub, lub-dub.

     Noah’s mom stands just out of view in the doorway. He turns
     off the record player, letting it groan to a stop.

            MOM (O.S.)
I don’t know why you’d wanna
listen to that. It’s hell’s soundtrack.

Howling winds and pounding hearts are one thing, but groaning ghouls prove too much for young Noah and he calls it a night. Maybe Mom was right, why would anyone want to listen to a soundtrack filled with nothing but scary sounds?

Better yet, what type of person would send such a gift to a child?

As it turns out, the crazy type that lives off-grid on a diet of daisies and roadkill.  Scary Sounds of the Night is more than a recording; it’s a 12” vinyl nightmare that refuses to be put on mute.

…And it knows your name.

Rob Herzog’s Creak and Shriek delivers a strikingly simple yet effective horror short.  Two characters, one room and some well placed sound FX could bring this horror short to the screen with a minimal budget.  Any filmmaker looking to get their hands on a fun Twilight Zone style chiller would be remiss not to check this short script out.

About the writer: Rob Herzog of Chicago teaches American literature and moderates a high school yearbook. He has also coached freshmen wrestling. He will soon earn a master’s degree in English composition from Northeastern Illinois University. He has written six short scripts and one feature screenplay. His shorts have won prize money in two small contests and awards in some others. He can be reached at: robherzogr (a) hotmail (dot) com

Read Creak and Shriek (8 pages in pdf format)

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: Steve Miles started writing scripts around five years ago after realizing that his social life was vastly overrated. He enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit – from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums. Check out more of his work at sjmilesscripts.webs.com

Friday, August 24, 2018

All Things Blue by Steven Miles – short script review (available for production) - post author Steven Clark

All Things Blue (8 pages in pdf format) by Steve Miles

A fleeting moment of friendship leads a lonely young girl to a devastating truth.

In an everyday neighborhood, could be yours, there is danger, and it could come from a myriad of sources — a stranger, an errant vehicle or something as simple as a scraped knee.

But for six-year-old Iza and her mother, Adel, something fierce hides among the clouds. Something ready to pounce at any moment. It keeps them indoors, glued to the radio, with a heavy supply of bottled water and rations at the ready.

Adel says it’s a Dragon, with claws like icicles and eyes big enough to see anything that moves. That’s why Daddy had to go away and fight it. And this is what Iza believes.

But we know better.

The tension is palpable, as Adel struggles about her day, keeping up this charade. Something’s got to give, and it will happen sooner rather than later.

Stifled by being locked away from the world, Iza roams outside to a park across the street. There, she befriends a neighborhood boy, Ted, who’s not much older, but a world wiser. He, too, has grown tired of hiding indoors.

And for this one fleeting moment, they get to be kids again. Laughing. Giddy. Too lost in the moment to worry, they cheerfully take turns pushing one another on a roundabout.

It’s short-lived.

For as the Air Raid sirens scream in the distance, the children shoot a glance upwards to see the contrails of a warplane streaming across the sky.

This is Iza’s Dragon. But Ted knows the truth.

And so does Adel.

A coming of age tale at its core, screenwriter Steve Miles has weaved a heart wrenching narrative of a parent living in fear of the inevitable, coupled with the innocence of childhood on the verge of being lost forever.

If you’re a filmmaker, and you know your stuff, this is one you can read with your eyes closed. A festival ringer. A calling card of the highest order.

Production: The blueprint is meticulously laid out for you here. Two easy locations, and three good actors working on a small budget. Do this story justice, and it’ll do the same for you.

About the writer: Steve Miles started writing scripts around five years ago after realizing that his social life was vastly overrated. He enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit – from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums. Check out more of his work at sjmilesscripts.webs.com

Read All Things Blue (8 pages in pdf format)

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Find more scripts available for production.

About the reviewer: Based in upstate, NY, Steven Clark is the writer of over 30 short scripts, several of which are under option, in pre-production, or have already been made into films. On A Clear Night, a family Christmas feature aimed at a Hallmark Channel-type audience, is currently in the works. Steven can be reached at Steamroller138 (a) gmail. Check out his website BadRepScript.weebly.com and his other screenplays.

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author Guest Reviewer

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow (7 pages in pdf format) by Dave Lambertson

A bad marriage can turn some people into monsters…

Ever wonder how the most famous couples in fiction made it work after happily ever after? Couples like Tarzan and Jane, Anna and Kristoff, or… Frankenstein and his bride? Well, it might not be as blissful as you’d imagine.

That’s just where we meet Frankenstein and his bride in Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow: in marriage counseling, years after Mary Shelley’s story. Hey, even monsters have problems. He’s distant and literally emotionless, she’s tired of doing the same old things and just wants to go on a killer date (pun intended).

One thing they do agree on: they might be unhappy, but they’re not ready to be separated. “We were literally made for each other” Frankenstein pleads. So the marriage counselor dives in and a really monstrous couples therapy session begins.

As the truth comes out and secrets are revealed, the monster and his bride near a breakthrough… but it seems that every step forward leads to the couple taking two steps back. Will they make it? Not to spoil anything, but this story ends with a nice surprise… and this script is a bloody good time.

Characters: 3 – Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, marriage counselor

Budget: Low to Mid. Really only two locations, three actors, but you may have to increase the makeup budget to make sure your Stein’s look appropriately gory. That being said, an experienced director with a great crew can make this one look hideous (in the best possible way!)

About the Writer, Dave Lambertson: I took up writing rather late in life having already been retired before I put pen to paper (okay – finger to computer key) for the first time. My favorite genres to read and write are dramedies and romantic comedies.

In addition to this short, I have written four features; “The Last Statesman” (a 2015 PAGE finalist and a Nicholl’s and BlueCat quarterfinalist), “The Beginning of The End and The End” (a PAGE Semi-Finalist). Taking Stock (a drama) and a new comedy – “Screw You Tube”. Want to learn more? Reach Dave at dlambertson “AT” hotmail! And visit his website.

Read Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow (7 pages in pdf format)

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Find more scripts available for production.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter who offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. Reach him at his website, follow him on twitter @MitchScripts, or email him at Mitch.SmithScripts (a) gmail.

Friday, August 17, 2018

Insomniac by David M Troop – Filmed! - post author Zach Zupke

Insomniac (12 page short thriller in pdf format) by David M Troop

A late night talk jock gets an unsettling caller.

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Read the script review

Hollywood and its inhabitants live in a crazy paradox. In one breath, they claim originality to be extinct. Yet they pan for it… daily. Then, when a true nugget of uniqueness is found, it’s immediately turned into a movie dating game:

“Think of it as Superman meets Super Fly!”

The Godfather – meets George Burn’s Oh, God!

Mary Poppins Meets Mary Jane!”

(I think that last one actually happened. At least my hallucination-induced penguins say so.)

And David Troop’s hauntingly clever Insomniac could certainly be pitched in those terms. It’s “Play Misty for Me” meets “Se7en.” Now there’s an easy elevator sell. But I’d rather call it… screenplay gold!

Like many an evil tale, Insomniac begins at the edge of night. Late night talk show host Dave Burrows burns the late night oil in Philly – catering to listeners who’d rather not be listening, but have tuned in for multiple sorry reasons: “My husband snores.” “You catch the Eagles game, Dave?” In other words, they’re insomniacs. Sleep’s a distant memory.

But Dave’s rapport with his listeners soothes their woes… well, mostly. Treating each anonymous caller as a long-lost friend, his delivery is warm and glib. Especially when he gets a ring from “The Caller”, who tells him – “I’m having this nightmare. But I’m awake.” The Caller worries out loud that he’s gone crazy.

“No. Actually it sounds like my first marriage,” quips a weary Dave. “Get out and take a walk. Clear your head.” Spot on advice. Or so it seems.

Two weeks later, the “Caller” resurfaces. This time it’s to thank Dave for his sage advice. The Caller’s enjoyed his new practice of walking at night. Especially that time he met a freshman girl. “She looked young. Almost too young to be in college…”

The Caller trails off, his voice sinister. And Dave snaps instantly awake. Both he – and the reader – know immediately when this story’s heading. Details of a butterfly shaped toe ring. A foot tied to a bed. Muffled screams. And a bedpost slamming against a wall. Helpless to do anything, Dave (and his technicians) take the horrifying sounds in.

But ultimately – is it just a prank? A sleep-deprived man’s sick idea of humor? Or is the Caller horrifyingly real – leaving a mysterious trail of terror, wafting over the city like scattered radio waves? You’ll have to read Insomniac to find out. Inspiringly original, it’s a throwback to the golden age of terror and suspense. A case of “clever” meets “terrifying.”

Budget/casting: Locations minimal. A rented sound booth would be great, but any office setting will suffice. An apartment and a toe ring. Four actors…and a foot. Also, I immediately heard Kevin Spacey as the Caller. If you can get him, give HIM a call. Immediately!

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus. Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced. Dave would like to make it three. He was a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com. Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie. He can be reached at dtroop506 “AT” Gmail

Read Insomniac (pages in PDF format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: An accomplished writer as well, Zack Zupke lives in Los Angeles. He can be contacted via email at zzupke “AT” yahoo

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author Guest Reviewer

Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse by James Barron

Life after the zombie apocalypse is harsh and uncompromising. But for two stoners holed up in an apartment with a lifetime supply of weed, it’s more like an inconvenience.

Remember when Seth Rogen and Co. faced the biblical apocalypse in This Is the End? A few of them stumbled successfully through doomsday, but how would they fare if they were faced with a zombie apocalypse instead? This is the very question asked by James Barron’s The Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse.

The answer? Not too well. Not at all.

Faced with Z Day and barricaded in their dorm, three friends (Mark, Steve and Liam) find themselves in a terrible pickle when their food runs out, leaving them starving and trapped – or worse. They intensely debate what to do: Steve and Liam vote to hold out one more day… aided by hits from their favorite bong. But Mark, the sensible non-stoner, insists they need to send someone outside to gather supplies and do recon. But who should be the lucky one?

Borrowing a cue from This Is the End, the trio draw toothpicks: he who pulleth the shortest stick is doomed to venture into the great unknown. Unfortunately for Mark, he’s inevitably chosen to leave for the munchie run – through a terrifying, zombified world.

What happens next? Well, without spoiling the finish, things go about as well as can be expected. And definitely not as planned.

A fun, chuckle-a-minute script, Slacker’s Guide has lots of things: stoner humor, Millennial appeal – and zombie action (no kidding). Scoop this up now… or wait until you take another hit from your bong for creative inspiration.

Fair warning though: act fast. This script might be picked up faster than a bag of Doritos in a stoner’s dorm.

Budget: Mid to high. A few locations (dorm room, hallway, stairway, food store). Lots of zombies, three good buddies and some props. Although, if you’re packing weed, you’ve got one of the major props covered already.

About the writer, James Barron: James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

Read Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse (14 pages in PDF format)

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Find more scripts available for production.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter who offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. Reach him at his website, follow him on twitter @MitchScripts, or email him at Mitch.SmithScripts (a) gmail.

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Out of Character – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author Guest Reviewer

Out of Character (9 pages in pdf format) by R.E. McManus

Screenwriter Jack creates characters that live and breathe… maybe TOO much?

Ever watch Will Ferrell films? Well, there’s one particular flick you should see. It’s called Stranger Than Fiction – a tale about a man named Harold Crick, who discovers one day that he is in fact a character in one of Emma Thompson’s novels. (Yes, Emma Thompson the actress – known in certain circles as Nanny McPhee.) Fortunately, Harold Crick’s a gentle soul; despite the wringer Emma puts him through, he’s pretty harmless all the way.

But what if a character you wrote was far more dangerous and… unhappy with their fate? What would they do to their creator? By final Fade Out, would YOU be safe?

That’s the very question screenwriter Jack faces in R.E. McManus’ twisty short Out of Character: when one of his shadiest characters arrives at his doorstep – armed, angry, and brimming with demands.

When Out of Character opens, Jack’s writing in his claustrophobic unorganized study – surrounded by empty pizza boxes, half-finished cups of coffee and writer’s manuals galore. (A scene all too real for some writers.) Just then, the doorbell rings. Jack answers – and finds himself face-to-face with… a man named Ken. There’s a pistol in Ken’s hand. Strangely familiar features on his face.

Ken forces his way inside.

Tense bantering ensues – until the stranger-than-truth reality is revealed. Ken’s one of Jack’s characters – disgruntled and demanding change! According to Ken, Jack created him a bit too fat. A lot too poor. And with too much attitude to let such things slide. Using his revolver to do the talking, Ken insists that Jack give him a thinner waistline, a better car, and a supermodel girlfriend as well (can you say ‘join the club’?)

But can Jack do such things, and shove all creative integrity aside?

We won’t spoil the ending – promise. But needless to say, the tension rachets up quick. Jack attempts to comply with Ken’s milder demands, but conspires to take down his creation… before the plot gets too wild…

Equally humorous and tense, Out of Character is a great comedic dark script, stuffed with Easter Eggs for directors and writers alike. Grab it before someone writes YOU off. And the next time you compose a scene? Think real careful about Flat Slob #2’s feelings. Maybe it’s not wise to piss him off that much.

Production – Low budget. Two actors, one location (a house), one computer and one gun.

About the writer: R.E. McManus was born in England, of Irish roots. Hence he was always a little confused. He has since travelled the globe, and noted what he saw on his travels. He’s been writing since he could pick up a pen. The fact they were IOUs is neither here nor there.

He fell in love with film when he first saw 2001: A Space Odyssey at the age of six. Although he’s still not sure about the spelling of Odyssey. It’s still looks wrong,

He loves Fincher, Hitchcock and Kubrick. And Faith No More. And Elvis. He even has a dog named after him. This seemed like a good idea until he went to the park.

Want more information? (Just say yes – you know you do!) Then head over to his website at Rendevous.yolasite.com, or email him at redarcy2000 (a) yahoo.co.uk.

Read: Out of Character

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Find more scripts available for production.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter who offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. Reach him at his website, follow him on twitter @MitchScripts, or email him at Mitch.SmithScripts (a) gmail.

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