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Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Tim Westland’s For the Love of God – Optioned! - posted by wonkavite

Hmmm… quite a double entendre there. Is it not?

For The Love of God: we urge all STS fans to read this post!

It is hereby announced that Tim Westland’s spectacular short For The Love of God has now been optioned. Just imagine – a writer capable of tackling a mix of sensitive subjects: with a splendid blend of style, humor and humanitarian sensibility as well.

That’s what we’d shoot for at STS, when in search of a stand-out script to film.

Sure enough – one lucky director did. We’ll keep you apprised as this one develops. All the way to the silver indie screen.

In the meantime, we highly suggest you look over Tim’s other work. The man writes in a variety of genres – each intelligently nuanced, and available for production as we speak:

Shorts

Better Be Good – (Holiday Fantasy Short) – When a young boy finds Santa’s lost bag of toys in a nearby forest, his first thought is to return it. His big brother has other ideas though, which might prove life changing for both of them. https://simplyscriptsreviews.wordpress.com/2014/11/06/better-be-good-short-script-for-review-available-for-production/ NOTE: CHRISTMAS THEME – grab this before Santa (or Krampus) rips it away!

Balls Out (comedy) – Legendary Surfing Pioneer, Mick “Balls Out” Shelly, hasn’t hit the waves in five decades. But an opportunity to reclaim the spotlight takes Mick and people from his past on a trip down memory lane that none are likely to forget. https://simplyscriptsreviews.wordpress.com/2015/10/23/balls-out/

Careful What You Wish For (comedy/fantasy) – Magic genies and bottles. Such things never end well.  Or DO they? https://simplyscriptsreviews.wordpress.com/2015/07/09/careful-what-you-wish-for-short-script-review-available-for-production/

A Line in the Sand (Hard Political SF/Drama) – Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive. https://simplyscriptsreviews.wordpress.com/2015/04/06/a-line-in-the-sand-short-script-review-available-for-production/

TV Series

Loose Screws (TV Pilot/Drama/Thriller with writer John Robbins) – A successful psychiatrist finds himself losing his grip on reality – and turns to an old patient – a girl with a mysterious mathematical talent, that he used and betrayed years ago. https://simplyscriptsreviews.wordpress.com/2015/01/01/loose-screws-featured-television-pilot-review-available-for-option/

(in) Equality (SF – In development. Treatment available) – A collaboration with writer John Robbins and J.E. Clarke – a hard SF TV series in the speculative vein of Orphan Black.

Features

Hunted/Stitched (Feature Horror with writer Rod Thompson) – After accidentally shooting a girl in the mysterious Ozark mountains, five hunting buddies must battle for their lives and their souls when a backwoods hillbilly taxidermist invokes ancient supernatural powers to bring his monstrous patchwork creations to life to exact his revenge.  Note to Directors who focus on contest winners… Stitched has been wowing the big ones.  Quite well! https://simplyscriptsreviews.wordpress.com/2015/04/01/hunted-feature-length-script-review-available-for-production/

About Tim himself: Tim Westland, co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, received first place for Balls Out in the NNYM 15 page contest. An outstanding writer with an eye for the details, his IMDB page can be found here. And he can be reached here (when not subsumed in writing throes): timwestland “AT” hotmail

Friday, September 11, 2015

Stone Cold Sober – Short Script Review - posted by wonkavite

Stone Cold Sober

When a man confronts a woman that’s tailing him, he learns she’s his future daughter, who knows about an awful crime he’s yet to commit.

Edith Piaf famously sang about having no regrets. Well, she was lucky. Most of us have regrets. Something we wish we’d done. Something we wish we hadn’t. But what if you had the chance, that one opportunity to go back and fix the past? Time travel films have massive appeal to audiences for this very reason, like Back to The Future and Terminator 2. The idea that you can change the past, or undo a terrible mistake – that’s a universal, crowd-pleasing premise.

And that’s exactly what Stone Cold Sober serves up today.

The script revs up the tension on Page One. Protagonist Natalie’s in her car, following Renee. They’re both in their thirties. She watches him taking out another woman, so it’s safe to assume he’s cheating. Right?

But no! This isn’t an ordinary drama. As Natalie continues to stalk Rene, we discover his favourite hangout is the liquor store. He’s a heavy drinker, to say the least. Ironically, the liquor store is where Natalie and Rene have their first encounter. Rene’s confused by Natalie’s claim – that she’s his daughter from the future. But the stuff Natalie knows – personal stuff – finally convinces Rene she’s telling the truth.

When Natalie and Rene begin to bond as father and daughter, they prove that blood isn’t just thicker than water. It’s thicker than time and space, too.

But Natalie’s there with a purpose – to stop Rene from committing a terrible crime. She pulls a gun on Rene, putting their very existence on the line. After a struggle, Rene disarms Natalie… it looks like she’s failed to stop him. But has she? Or has Rene learned enough about himself and what the future holds, to make the changes he really should?

Take a peek at Stone Cold Sober today and find out. Full of grit and drama, this smart little script is a great time travelling saga. Overlooking it could be one of your biggest regrets.

Pages: 8

Budget/Cast: Low (which we love) and a cast of 3. Simple!

About the writer, C.J. Walley:  I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write new specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producers, directors, and actors in LA, NYC, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington DC, Zurich, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Dallas while occasionally blogging for Stage 32.  If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com

About the Reviewer: Elaine Clayton is a London-based screenwriter, who has written several well-received shorts and is currently working on her first feature length scripts. Comfortable in a broad range of genres, Elaine has an innate sense of structure and arc development. Contact her at Elaine_clayton (AT) Hotmail(.)co(.)uk

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Time for Love – Short Script Review – Optioned! - posted by Anthony Cawood

Time for Love

An elderly lady discovers an old flame in her shed

Sometimes, a script engages you from the first couple of sentences; usually for a combination of reasons. Its introduction piques your interest.. hinting at mysteries to come. Its story beats stimulate an easy empathy – compelling one to root for a character, even before you know their name. Such tales flow from simple beginnings, weaving a subtle narrative that never lets one disengage. Cracking stuff. When done just right.

Time for Love is such a script. A super-short four page piece, TFL follows Marjorie Flanagan (86), confronting an interloper in her shed. Armed with a stick, she prepares for battle – only to be hit with the shock of her life instead. Sitting in the middle of the barn is her husband, George; a time-traveling inventor who disappeared sixty years ago – vanishing into thin air, without a trace. But now he’s back. And he’s hasn’t aged. A twenty seven year old wanderer, tethered to a tempermental steam-punk time machine (a huge jerry-rigged kings wing chair). It’s a moment of sweet reconciliation for two long lost lovers. But with a caveat that threatens to ruin all. You see, George can’t stay in one place for very long. If he does, he ages. Badly. After decades of trying, he’s finally found Marjorie. And has only minutes to make up for a lifetime of lost memories.

Science fiction at it’s finest, Time for Love isn’t about gadgets or FX.   It’s a psalm to love, aging and loss, and the fragility of the human condition. Mixing in echoes of Dr. Who and classic literature, Bowcott infuses TFL with a real sense of poignancy… one that resonates on a universal level. A limited location classic, TFL has only one setting – a shed – two actors and a time machine. It’s sure to be a festival favorite – grab this one before the flow of time snatches it away!

Budget: Low. And designing that time machine is going to be fun in and of itself!

About the reviewer:  Anthony Cawood is an award winning screenwriter from the UK with a bunch of short scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. He is currently trying to get someone to make one of his three feature scripts. Links to his films, scripts and other goodies can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk

About the writer: Dustin Bowcott is a self employed microbe retailer and father of four boys. He has enjoyed writing since the day he read his first novel. For Dustin, writing is something he has to do, when not writing, he’s thinking about writing and will absorb himself into multiple projects at one time. When he gets tired of writing one thing he moves onto another and has been known to work on three different stories in one day, writing for sometimes 12 hours straight and, on occasion, even longer. Dustin can turn his hand to any genre and has just finished first draft of a new children’s novel. Dustin is a BBC Writer’s Room finalist and a Shore Scripts finalist both in 2014. He is a produced and optioned writer, and has recently turned his hand to production, having produced his first short film with another in the pipeline that should be completed this year. Want to see what else he has in store? Give him a shout-out at dustin7375 “AT” gmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

In the Path of Totality – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

In the Path of Totality

A scientist and his wife come to terms with the end of the world

Big budget science fiction: it gets more grandiose, every year. Guardians of the Galaxy. Interstellar. Jupiter Ascending

But true SF buffs know the deal. Real science fiction isn’t about FX. It’s about people. Consequences. The impact of ideas and events on lives. That’s certainly true of classic SF novels, and some choice studio flicks as well. Millennial Man. AI. But where the heart of SF really beats is indie film. Primer. Moon. And scripts like Path of Totality.

With characters like Seema and Dr. Raj Kothapalli…

The story’s set in modern day; the Kothapalli’s home near the Marina. As the script opens, Seema watches her husband on TV, explaining astrophysics to a frightened world. The Sun’s been in the throes of a solar storm, you see; bathing the Earth in massive high energy flares. The ozone layer’s almost depleted. The magnetic field fading. But Raj downplays his interviewer’s concern. They really don’t know what to expect, he says. The Earth’s magnetic poles might just reverse – with no tragic side effects. Seema scowls, and shuts off the transmission. At this point, she knows her husband’s talking B.S.

She confronts Raj when he comes home. Lie to the public, she tells him. But don’t try to play games with me. The couple bicker – about the facts, and Earth’s pending fate. Cancer’s on the rise, due to the weakened atmosphere. The power grid’s failing as well. Seema argues it’s just a matter of time. She mentions the family boat – the Dharma – waiting for them at the dock. Why not just sail away? Enough what precious moments they have left?

But Raj refuses to face the truth. It’s not the end of the world, he insists. Not if he can have his way. That night, he heads to the bathroom… and finds Seema’s positive pregnancy test. It’s a wake up call, in more ways than one. But what can one man do to protect his family – when faced with the end of the world?

A sweet and very human script, Path of Totality is true science fiction. Yes, there’s talk of space, and science “things”. But underneath that… is a story of people. And family. Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke would be proud.

About the writer: I’m a one time advertising copywriter who has fallen in love with screenwriting. I’ve a written handful of features, one has been produced as a Role Playing Game (RPG) and made its debut at CarnageCon. I enjoy writing short scripts since it’s a fun exercise for sharpening my skills; so far one of my shorts has been produced as a student film project and I welcome the opportunity to have more of my worked produced via participation on Simply Scripts. Sylvia can be reached at sylviedahl “AT” AOL.

Pages: 8

Budget: A bit of budget would be needed for the Dharma (boat). But the rest of the script is simple. Two very solid actors. And some small FX that can be done in post.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Monday, February 2, 2015

Clone Wife – Feature Length Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Clone Wife

A lovesick scientist clones his estranged wife, but when she unexpectedly comes out nine years younger, his broken marriage gets a magical reboot.

Remember when movies were fresh and fun? Big colorful premises that mixed comedy with drama and that needed touch of soul? Classic films like Splash and Big – such tales don’t grow old; they still charm and entertain today. Let’s face it, folks: gross out comedy like The Interview has a (very) limited shelf life. But Honey I Shrunk the Kids? That stuff stands the test of time…

And speaking of goofy scientists… There’s always room for one more. Especially when they’re wrapped in a warm n’ heartfelt rom-com, with action and drama on the side. With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, timing doesn’t get better than this.

Readers, meet Travis Wonders. A classic inventor type with his nose buried in textbooks and computer screens… his head perpetually in the clouds. For ten years, he’s been hard at work in his basement lab, attempting to clone woodpecker DNA. Assisting in the process: a little fluffy white dog named Algernon, and a pair of robotic arms nicknamed Eli and Emma. Then there’s Travis’ wife of nine years, Renee. Though she’s gone the corporate route, Travis can always depend on her support.

At least, that’s what he thinks.

Unbeknownst to the poor professor, marital trouble’s a-brewing. Tired of Travis’ never-ending tinkering, Renee’s accepted a position in Japan. An extended separation. Probably divorce. She just… hasn’t quite told her husband yet.

The couple heads to dinner at Montana Tony’s, a restaurant owned by Renee’s flamboyant brother Stig. Renee’s whole family’s there. Her acerbic mother Astrid throws barbs at Travis and sips martinis. And mentions Renee’s ex-boyfriend – Guy Ducharme. The successful author of Marry Your Prom Queen (hint, hint), Guy’s in town for a book signing. Not to mention the upcoming high school class reunion. Wouldn’t Renee just love to see him again? After a tense exchange, Renee’s secret spills. She’s leaving Travis. And there’s nothing he can say.

Not that Travis doesn’t try. He does: epically. But the day of Renee’s fateful departure arrives all too soon. Despite her husband’s pathetic pleas, her mind hasn’t changed. Renee drives off to the airport with Stigs, leaving a forlorn Travis with Algernon. Struck by a sudden misgiving, she forces a promise out of her brother. Check up on Travis. Make sure he’s okay?

Left alone, the professor falls into a funk. And far deeper into his research. Until an accident results in breakthrough! Doggy Algernon is cloned. Voila: Clone Al (dubbed “Alfredo.”). But what good is success without someone you love to share it? Renee still won’t return Travis’ calls. A drunken Travis extracts a lock of Renee’s hair from an anniversary photo album. It’ll take years to sequence her DNA – but he vows to start over again, rambling into a video to record his thoughts. Leaving the lab, he heads upstairs to sleep.

But a storm’s abrewing. Literally. As Travis slumbers, a bolt of lightning hits the backyard… supercharging robot arms Eli and Emma. And resulting in – Clone Wife.

A nine years younger model. With all of Renee’s memories up to that time (including a still unsullied love for Travis). And – thanks to the video – Clone Wife’s quite aware of who she is.

Needless to say, Travis receives a rude awakening… and one hell of a dilemma. A second chance – with a younger woman. Who in the world wouldn’t want that? But is Clone Wife really Renee? Where does Travis’ love and alliance really lie?

And the equation’s about to get more complex. Struck by unexplainable twinges, Renee boards a flight to the States to see Travis again. Then there’s the upcoming reunion. And slippery, sleazy Guy Ducharme, who’s coming home to claim his ex-prom queen. And nothing’s gonna stop him this time….

Chock full of over-the-top comedy and colorful characters, Clone Wife is the kind of classic comedy ride that audiences crave. But – like all true clones – CW is more than a sum of its parts. Because under the gloss and slapstick, there beats a far more poignant theme, embodied in the characters of Renee and Clone Wife: learning to face yourself (literally) – all your choices and mistakes. And blazing your own path in life and love… no matter who you’ve been “programmed” to be.*

* And speaking of the titular character – that’s a major strength to this script as well.  *TWO* strong, meaty female roles in one?  Get Jennifer Aniston on the phone!  🙂 Orphan Black ain’t seen nuthin’ yet!

About the writer: (story by Brett Martin and Ben Liska) Brett Martin is an unrepped screenwriter and freelance reader living in Los Angeles.  He sold an action/thriller to Quixotic Entertainment, which is associated with Zack Snyder. Once optioned by Destiny Pictures, his comedy feature, CLONE WIFE, just underwent a major face lift. He’s also developing a tentpole action feature & cartoon web series as he continues his quest to be a professional screenwriter.

Pages: 103

Budget: Mid-range. Yes, there’s the lab to create – but most of the scenes are set in simple locations. Houses, school auditoriums, a restaurant. Locations that can be obtained easily. The most important factor – getting a crew of actors with terrific comedic timing.

About the writer: (story by Brett Martin and Ben Liska) Brett Martin is an unrepped screenwriter and freelance reader living in Los Angeles.  He sold an action/thriller to Quixotic Productions, which is owned by Brett Stimely (Watchmen, Transformers 3). He’s also developing a tentpole action feature & cartoon web series as he continues his quest to be a professional writer.

Pages: 103

Budget: Mid-range. Yes, there’s the lab to create – but most of the scenes are set in simple locations. Houses, school auditoriums, a restaurant. Locations that can be obtained easily. The most important factor – getting a crew of actors with great comedic timing.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Friday, July 18, 2014

A Face in the Crowd – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by The Merrows

Laptop-Shorts

A Face in the Crowd — Review

An analyst at an intelligence agency is horrified when his subject starts to follow him…

Paranoia strikes deep. Into your life it will creep.” – Stephen Stills, For What It’s Worth

Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean they aren’t after you.” – Joseph Heller, Catch-22.

There’s plenty to be paranoid about these days, isn’t there? Drones watching us from above, the IRS targeting us, NSA listening to us. But what if you are the NSA? Nothing for you to worry about, right?

Or is there?

In the eerie psycho-sci-fi screenplay A Face in the Crowd, writer Anthony Cawood tells the tale of Derin, a 26-year-old analyst for the NSA who abruptly finds the paranoia tables turned.

As Derin runs a face-recognition program on his PC to analyze photographs of a riot, a man in one of the shots turns and looks out through the computer screen into Derin’s office. A short time later, Derin discovers the man has disappeared from the photo completely.

Time to be paranoid? (Did I mention it’s a still photograph?)

From that moment on, Derin has a series of real-world encounters with the mysterious man. Or at least it seems. A reflection here, a shadowy glimpse there… but are they real? Or just a figment of Derin’s panicked imagination? Or – perhaps – some strange blend of the two? Because, as Aldous Huxley once said, “There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception.

Derin is stuck in between… but not for long.

A Face in the Crowd is an enjoyable, chilling read. And – given privacy concerns of the day – quite timely as well.

About the writer: Anthony Cawood is an aspiring screenwriter from the UK with a number of scripts in various stages of production, two of which have just wrapped shooting. His script, A Certain Romance, recently won in the Nashville Film Festival Screenwriting Competition (short script category). You can find out more at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk

Pages: 7

Budget: Moderate. A handful of locations, including a high-tech office, a CCTV monitoring room, a car park, a supermarket, a cafe, and Derin’s home. Five actors with speaking parts, plus lots of extras. Some FX, but nothing unreasonable.

About the reviewer: Scott Merrow co-writes screenplays with his wife Paula. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy… the whole nine yards.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Give Me Shelter – Short Script Review (Optioned and in Production!) - posted by KP Mackie

Laptop-Shorts

Give Me Shelter

“Divorcees Moira and James attempt survival in the wake of an apocalyptic event. From a bomb shelter deep beneath the Earth, they must find peace between themselves before facing the new, chaotic world above.”

 The daily grind. Navigating bumper-to-bumper traffic, finding a seat on the subway, racing to class, transporting kids to school. There are appointments to keep, errands to run, never-ending housework, and a flow of constant bills to pay. Ah yes; the Responsibilities of Life. Your list may vary; but it stares you in the face everyday. Insurmountable… at least without that morning Starbucks.

For a few moments, though, imagine that everything you do — that routine you rely on so intimately — is gone. In a puff of smoke. The blink of an eye. Your daily life; obliterated. All that planning and plodding, blown clear out the window. And worst of all – no Starbucks!

As Douglas Adams was fond of saying, Try Not to Panic…

Even though your life has been shattered to bits.

In Rod Thompson’s drama, Give Me Shelter, 30 something Moira and James hole up in a small bomb shelter, having barely escaped the total destruction of their house, their neighborhood, and all their friends.

The bunker contains two small cots. A single light bulb dangles overhead. Some couples might find it romantic. But Moira and James are recently divorced. Not that divorce is the end of the world. Although, perhaps, in this case it is…

Because something HUGE is wreaking havoc above ground.

The couple huddle in darkness, hoping to escape attention. James attempts to calm a hysterical Moira – and promises her they’ll be safe. Though he can’t quite convince himself.

Apocalyptic events in a contained location; that alone is enough to sell a script. Yet, Moira and James’ relationship is what truly makes GMS shine – featuring terrific lines such as these:

James (singing to distract Moira from her fears): Sorry. Old habits.

Moira: No. Keep going. You may have been a shitty husband, but you were always a good singer.

James: By the sound of things up there, I may be the last singer before this day is over…

Confronting annihilation is no vacation from the daily grind. But it can really put things in perspective. Past the panic and the urgency – the dialogue in this script rings true, depicting the familiarity of two people that have been together for a long time. Fought – but loved each other, too. And in some small way… still do.

So if you’re a director drawn to well developed characters – and catastrophe – then grab your spot on the cot. ‘Cause there’s only one slot available!

About the writer, Rod Thompson:I have been writing creatively since I learned how to write. There is just something about telling a story that I can never get over. Storytelling in itself is like an old flame that occassional comes to me and just says, “Use me.” The ability to watch a movie through words, or to craft a world in such a manner is the closest to Godliness that man will ever come. True story. Contact Rod at RodThompson1980 “AT” gmail.com

Pages: 5 pages

Budget: Low. A sparse interior for the bomb shelter. Equip with cots, a bare bulb, and two talented actors. Imagine the fun you’ll have creating sound effects for the end of the world!

About the reviewer for Give Me Shelter:California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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