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Monday, February 13, 2017

Free – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by David M Troop

Free (76 page Sci Fi Drama in pdf format) by Paul J. Williams

An honor student begins the next phase of his life.

If time travel was scientifically possible, what would you do? Really?

Would you change the course of human history? Or simply go back and tell someone you loved them – one last time? Would you prevent a horrific accident from occurring, saving thousands of lives? Or spend the day with one special person, and change their life forever?

Time travel and its possibilities – it’s been the theme of some of the most popular movies in history (in a variety of genres): The Terminator travels back in time to eliminate an enemy by killing his mother. In Groundhog’s Day, an egotistical weatherman relives the same day again and again – until he learns the true meaning of love.

In his short script “Free”, Paul Williams explores a question we’ve all asked ourselves. What if we could go back and time, and undo a costly mistake?

Although only eighteen, Robert McKenna has a lifetime of accomplishment ahead of him. A brilliant and promising merit scholar, Robert studies quantum physics – specializing in the theory of time-travel. Staying at home with his mother and younger brother Timmy (12), Robert’s preparing for a four year trip. He whiles away the remaining hours working on equations and algorithms… making sure they’re absolutely right.

But Timmy won’t let him be. Seeking his big brother’s attention, he pesters Robert with questions. About the possibilities of time travel. And Robert’s own plans for the future. Has his big brother found a gateway to the past? And if so… what’s his motivation?

Free may have the sheen of Science Fiction. But at heart, it’s a tragedy. About families. Grief, loss and regret. And wishing you could solve life’s problems with a mathematical solution. If only it was that easy.

This is a script that every skilled director wishes for: subtle and deeply touching, with layers of rich symbolism. Properly brought to the screen, it’ll haunt your audiences for a long time.

Budget: Low to moderate. One location: an upper middle-class home. And a pet bird. (Don’t ask – just read the script!)

About the writer: Paul J. Williams is a New Jersey-based multi-award-winning screenwriter, producer, and director with several scripts in various stages of film production. He has been a member of the New Jersey Screenwriter’s Group since 2009. His latest movie, Case #5930, which he wrote and produced, was released in 2015.

He has also served as a decorated law enforcement officer for the past eighteen years, both as a Federal Officer with the U.S. Department of Justice and as a Police Officer for the City of Newark, N.J.

He can be reached at pauljwilliams9 (a) yahoo. Check out his IMDB page.

About the reviewer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus. Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced. Dave would like to make it three. He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com. Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie. He can be reached at dtroop506 (a) gmail.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Passage – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Guest Reviewer

Passage (18 pages in pdf format) by Zach Jansen

The road to Hell is paved with long hallways…

Nothing beats a mystery for getting a reader (and film audience’s) attention. Think about scripts that have truly captured the world’s imagination in recent years: Memento. Source Code. And if you can go low budget, that’s even more gravy on one’s indie plate… Case in point, the tiny SF piece de resistance entitled Moon.

Of course, Moon’s taken. And filmed. Fortunately, it’s not the only gem on the marketplace. ‘Cause Passage is available.

A micro-budget mind twister, Passage opens with our lead (Tommy, 20s), waking up in an unfamiliar hallway. Jessa hovers over him, asking if he’s okay. The two quickly meet cute, and venture out into a maze of generic hallways – seeking an exit to escape. And those hallways go on forever. Until they encounter Mike. And he’s no stranger. Turns out he’s Jessa’s ex. And when Mike sees Tommy, he ain’t too pleased. A few harsh words and misunderstandings later, and Mike knocks poor Tommy out cold.

Tommy wakes up soon after – Jessa hovering over him. Like a rewound VHS, the scene starts to replay, same as before. But Tommy remembers some of it. And everything looks so damned familiar….

The scenario plays out, again and again. Like a ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ book, Tommy tries new actions each time. With the unfortunate same result. Knocked out stone cold. On the floor.

…until Tommy decides to fight back. He won’t let Mike get the upper hand this time. Will Tommy find a way out of the maze? Or suffer limbo for eternity?

Think of Passage as Groundhog Day on a micro budget. Only three actors needed, and a generic hallway. It’s a lot of premise, packed into a tiny space. Which makes this one a script you gotta see!

Budget: Minimal. Seriously: three actors and a few long hallways – that’s all you need for this one!

About the writer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota. He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script. If for some reason you want to learn more about him, you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog.

About the reviewer: Going by the handle “medstudent”, Joseph can be found at Simplyscripts and his script Last Chance has been filmed.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Super Janet – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Gary Rowlands

Super Janet (27 pages in pdf format) by Kay Poiro

Winner 2014 International Family Film Festival for Best Screenplay Short Sci-Fi / Fantasy

An ascerbic teen discovers she’s – a little different

Any you guys know what superhero movies such as Batman, Spider-Man, Iron Man and Superman have in common?

Well, for starters they’re amongst the biggest movie franchises of all time! These cinematic treats have grossed BILLIONS of dollars at the box office! Moviegoers are drawn to their local Cineplex ‘faster than a speeding bullet’ each time their favorite crime fighter does battle with some dastardly villian hell-bent on wreaking chaos and destruction on our pitiful, fragile lives.

But – at the risk of stating the obvious – there’s another shared factor at play. To put it bluntly, they’re all GUYS.

Men gifted with special powers and skills.

Whilst this makes for great entertainment (if you’re anything like me) it’d be nice to see a different kind of superhero for a change.

How about a complete underdog? Someone who can’t leap from a tall building, spin a web or fly? An ordinary schoolgirl, perhaps? At least, she thinks she’s ordinary. And who has a legitimate reason to wear tights.

Well, then – you’re in luck. Because Super Janet’s on the scene. Written by talented scribe Kay Poiro, this tongue-in-cheek script bursts with witty dialogue – enough to give The Avenger’s Joss Whedon a run for his money.

Our titular Janet’s just 14. A bit sarcastic, and struggling to pass algebra. Or understand her parents, Jack and Chrissy. (Jack, Janet and Chrissy. Think about that a minute. Won’t you?)

On the eve of her birthday, Chrissy drops a surprise on her daughter. Janet’s fifteenth birthday is around the corner. And her parents have planned an animal themed party. With a pinata. And they’ve invited the school lunch lady! Janet cringes. It’s totally lame. And pinatas? They give her the willies!

Needless to say, things couldn’t get worse. That is, until it does.

A strange man – Mr. Furley – shows up at school… and drops the real bombshell on our teen. You see, Janet’s really an alien. She’s had this ability to move things with her mind for years – but hey, why ask unnecessary questions? Her “parents” adopted her from the government when she was just an egg (getting a sweet new backyard shed in the bargain). But now aliens from her homeworld have arrived. A flotilla of warships orbit the Earth with a fearsome demand. Yo – hand over the girl. Or they’re gonna go bad-ass gangsta on humanity.

And Janet’s the only one who can stop them.

A kinda rude wake-up call for a teen – to find out she’s been lied to all her life. Will Janet step up to save the day? Or will it be “game over” for her – and the world that she’s grown to love?

Budget: Not cheap, but surprisingly not crazy either. A small cast. Some SFX that could be done in post with CGI. Add in a few sets: a house, school and spaceship interior (small), and you’ll be ready to blast off!

About the writer: Kay Poiro is an award-winning screenwriter and internationally produced playwright. Her stage plays have been performed across the country and on four continents and counting. Most recently, her TV pilot “Brewster Commons” won Best Short Script at the 2014 Harlem International Film Festival. In 2012, her feature script “Ridgeway Mystery Club” won Best Screenplay at the 8th Annual L.A. Femme Film Festival. She recently optioned her first feature script. Kay is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America and lives in Maryland. She can be reached at keishapoiro (a) yahoo.

About the Reviewer: Gary Rowlands cut his teeth writing sketch comedy. He was a commissioned writer on Spitting Image a hugely popular sketch show broadcast on national television in the UK. He has since branched out into writing features. His preferred genres are: Comedy, horror, thriller. He can be contacted at gazrow (a) hotmail dot com

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, January 27, 2017

Teeth – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by David M Troop

TEETH (13 pages in pdf format) by Bill Sarre

A soldier recovering from a failed mission must face a new enemy – in his mouth.

Who doesn’t love a great conspiracy flick?

Perched on the edge of your seat – watching the protagonist chip away the lies? Holding one’s breath as he uncovers a vast conspiracy that inevitably leads “all the way to the top” – ala “All the President’s Men,” Watergate style?

And if you like action, conspiracy films have that – in spades. Watch in concern as our hero runs for his life – a scenario that plays out in multiple ways. The Fugitive. The Man Who Knew Too Much. North by Northwest.

But whether your genre preference is Hitchcock or Oliver Stone (and his magnum opus, JFK), conspiracy films have similarities in their DNA: the characters digging through lies, rumors and worse – in the desperate hope of uncovering TRUTH.

Take Teeth’s protagonist, Hugo Web. An ex special-forces soldier, recovering from a failed mission on a covert military base. As the script opens, Hugo’s in excruciating pain. Physically. And mentally.

The source of his agony – his teeth.

You see, Hugo’s hearing voices in his mouth… radio signals filtered through his fillings. He pleads with his doctors to rip the offending choppers out. Once his teeth are gone, Hugo’s sure, he’ll be fine!

Yes, Hugo’s a man on the verge of total breakdown. And beyond. Racked by the guilt of leading loyal men to their deaths. As his doctor Jessica explains, “PTSD takes many forms.” Is Hugo delusional? Insane? Or is he a victim of a different kind…? A human guinea pig exploited by the vast military machine?

An ambitious thriller with great set pieces, “Teeth” is a perfect script for directors seeking something unique. What actor in their right mind wouldn’t want to play Hugo Web? So grab this script while you can. There’s lots to sink your, um, “Teeth” into…

Budget: Moderate. You’ll need uniforms, of course. And a set that looks like a hospital or military base!

About The Writer: An award winning writer, Bill Sarre has had scripts place both finalist and quarter finalist with Page and Bluecat.  Another short of his, The Grieving Spell, was recently grand prize winner of the London Film Awards. Bill can be reached at Bill.sarre (a) gmail.

About The Reviewer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a number two pencil. He’s written short screenplays for websites such as MoviePoet, Simply Scripts, and WriterArena. Update: Dave and his wife Jodi now spend most of their spare time spoiling their new grandson Oliver.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, January 2, 2017

Dry Days – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Gary Rowlands

Dry Days (8 pages in pdf format) by Mitch Smith

In a dystopian society where water has all but vanished, two deserters find a mysterious corpse that appears to have died from drowning.

Manhunt movies. A thrilling genre, to say the least. Heart pounding action at its best.

North by Northwest. The Fugitive. Silence of the Lambs. We keep watching – no matter how far into the nightmare dark they lead us. Why? Well, in part to see the hero win the day. But also because the best of such films contain some sort of mystery, which drives us to never turn our eyes away (at least until the secrets are revealed.)

Following in the footsteps of such cinematic greats is Dry Days. Written by talented scribe Mitch Smith, the script packs a mean action punch. And also asks the thematic question: “Can you have too much of a good thing?” – in a clever and entertaining way.

Set in a future where food and water are in desperately short supply, the story opens with our hero and heroine dragging themselves across the blazing hot desert. Being hunted by someone. Or something.

Exhausted and dehydrated, our fleeing couple are almost at death’s door. They encounter the corpse of a man lying half buried in the sand – a grim reminder to their pending fate. They’re on the verge of giving up… when our heroine – a former nurse – realizes the dead man drowned!

She deduces there must be water nearby. But how could someone drown in the desert?!

Hopes renewed, the two begin searching for water. Their quest is cut short by the arrival of Raze, a bone-thin deserter-hunter – with wild eyes and a loaded gun.

The dry blood around his mouth and ravenous look leaves us little doubt about his intentions.

Will our couple live to see another day? Or will survival of the fittest reign?

If you’re a director looking for the next Mad Max, then give Dry Days a spin. It’s easy to shoot, and action packed – with a fresh twist on the usual dystopian fare!

Budget: Fairly low. A sunny beach for the desert and a hallway made to look like a hospital. Throw in a handful of actors, a dune buggy and that’s pretty much it!

About the writer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts (a) gmail and follow Mitch on twitter @MitchScripts.

About the reviewer: Gary Rowlands cut his teeth writing sketch comedy and was a commissioned writer on the hugely popular Spitting Image broadcast on national television in the UK. He has since branched out into writing features and is actively seeking representation. He can be contacted at gazrow at hotmail dot com.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, December 29, 2016

Alba – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by The Merrows

Alba (5 pages in pdf foramt) by Robert G. Newcomer

Art…or abomination?

Alba, a short little screenplay, is a touching story of Science. Art. And a touch of magic.

On top of that, it’s mostly true…

Alba is a glowing bunny. Literally. Alba’s DNA has been spliced with phosphorescent jellyfish – giving her a greenish glow. (Especially when bathed in black light.) A case of science gone mad, you say? More like an art experiment – assisted by genetist “Ivan”. Unveiled to the world by artist “Dimitri” at the turn of the 21st century, Alba’s green glow was broadcast everywhere.

Needless say, not all were pleased. Angry demonstrations ensued, protesting the reduction of the “genome to a playground.” During the ensuring maelstrom of press, Ivan was almost fired. And Alba’s exhibit was cancelled – the bunny removed from her emerald spotlight.

As time passed, the headlines died away. Eventually Alba passed, as well. Over time, memory of the experiment faded – remembered only by a select few. Ivan. And his young daughter, Meghan. Too young to contemplate the greater issues, Meghan experienced Alba through innocent eyes – as the gentle (and glowing) creature she was.

Now grown, Meghan now tells the tale to her daughter, 7 year old Kelly. Giving it her own whimsical spin, Meghan tells Kelly of the sweet bunny… misunderstood by the entire world. Fortunately, there’s a secret grandpa’s been keeping. And a happy ending to Alba’s “tail”…

The truth is often stranger than fiction. In an industry where “dark and twisted” rules supreme, Alba is a stand out short. A touch of SF and fantasy – mixed with a huge helping of whimsy. A director can never go wrong with that!!

Budget: Low – medium. A few actors, minimal settings. Some glowing-bunny FX required!

About the writer: Robert Newcomer recently received his first IMDB credit for another short, Them That’s Dead. An intelligent writer, he has several other shorts and a horror feature length available for consideration. Bert’s IMDB credits are listed here.

About the reviewers: Scott & Paula Merrow are a husband and wife screenwriting team. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy – the whole nine yards. They’re reachable at scott-paula (a) comcast.net.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

End Point – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by David M Troop

End Point (pdf format) by Chris Keaton

A lone astronaut must save the Earth from colliding with a black hole.

Space. The final frontier. A place where no one can hear you scream.

Since 1902’s “A Trip to the Moon,” the movies have been fascinated with our vast and mysterious solar system. Whether we’re battling steel-fanged aliens on distant planets, experiencing close encounters here on Earth, or helping a lost E.T. find his way home, the possibilities are as endless as space itself.

In Chris Keaton’s science fiction drama “End Point,” we find the Earth (once again) facing certain doom. It seems our beloved planet is on a collision course with a black hole.

How can the Earth escape being sucked into a vacuum of nothingness, you ask?

Captain Bradley Rev answers the call and makes the ultimate sacrifice to save the human race.

As we join our hero, he is interviewed (presumably for the last time) about his mission. In an emotional scene, Captain Rev addresses the world and has a final conversation with his own grandson as the countdown begins.

WARNING! WARNING! The collison detectors sound the alarm. Can Captain Rev deploy the quantum accelerator in time and save humanity from certain destruction?

Like “2001 A Space Odyssey” and “Gravity,” “End Point” explores the subject of the lone astronaut drifting in space, facing the end. Captain Rev is a hero we all aspire to be and one all actors dream of portraying.

Directors who were raised on science fiction films and are technologically savvy would be encouraged to apply. It’s a chance to film your own “2001” and an opportunity to reveal your secret “if I could build my own spaceship” blueprints.

Pages: 6

Budget: Moderate. You’ll need a convincing set. This is no “Plan Nine from Outer Space.” You don’t have to go crazy, but you’ll want some detail to give your film the right atmosphere. Also, there’s some FX at the end which could be tricky. Of course, if you have green screen capability, you’re good to go.

About the writer: Chris Keaton is an Air Force veteran living with his family in sunny Arizona. He’s primarily a screenwriter, but he does love diving into prose. He has had several short screenplays produced and go on to win awards. He’s optioned a few features screenplays and currently has a thriller feature in post-production. A young-adult novel based on one of his screenplays is soon to be released. You can see some of his projects on his website, Chris-Keaton.com or follow him on Facebook at Facebook.com/ChrisKeaton.

About the reviewer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus. Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced. Dave would like to make it three. He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com. Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie. He can be reached at dtroop506 “AT” gmail.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, November 25, 2016

The Final Level – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

The Final Level (pdf format) by Jeff Bush

Two warriors fight for their survival in a wicked game with deadly adversaries.

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock throughout 2015, you’re aware that Sci-Fi is really a big thing. As of July 1st, Jurassic World’s grossed $520 million in the US alone. And newcomer Terminator: Genisys is up to $17M worldwide. Each a blockbuster in its own right; which is surely no surprise. ‘Cause who doesn’t love an adrenalin-pumping monster or robot flick… especially in these summer days?

Which is exactly the appeal of Jeff Bush’s riveting short, The Final Level. It’s a simple concept with non-stop action… limited location, but wild FX.

The protagonists: Gladiators Ayreon and Olzon – clad in leather armor and armed with plasma shooting guns. They’re trapped in a room and fighting to the death… creatures attacking on all sides.

What creatures you ask? Well, they’re something called the “Myygen” – “arachnid in appearance, with twitching, dripping whip like tails.” The Myygen come in different sizes (all equally lethal, of course.) They shoot a “moist, sticky web” of slime at their human targets – loaded with venom that burns. Poisons. And kills.

As their ammunition dwindles, Ayreon and Olzon retreat to a lift – one that promises them swift ascent to freedom. But as elevator engines start to rumble, the Myygens attack with a vengeance – blocking off the valiant warriors’ escape.

Why are Ayreon and Olzon there? Can they survive the onslaught? And if they do – what horrors await them just above?

Needless to say, this is one script that requires FX/CGI. But in these days of affordable tech and software – that’s far from an unreachable dream. Look at Cloverfield and District Nine – two films that proved that wild FX can be done effectively… and relatively cheap. If you’re a director that aspires to work in the SF field, grab Final Level and run with it. It could be your passport to even greater things!

Pages: 8

Budget: A small challenge, but imagine the fun with FX/CGI. Two lead testosterone-fueled actors, a female with a distinctive voice for voiceover work, plus a few extras.

About the Writer: A veteran writer with almost a decade of experience, Jeff Bush has written 15 shorts, and 2 features – with 3 more in the works. Partnered with writer Shawn Davis, Jeff has another film due to be optioned by Nancy Glass Productions/MTV, and a cowritten feature due for production in August, with release towards the end of 2015. A stickler for details and format, Jeff’s tastes run toward the horror/thriller genre… almost always with an R rating! Reach out to him at dreamscale (a) cox.net.

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on an animated feature.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Trapped – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Pete Barry

Trapped* (pdf format) by Chris Keaton

Searching for a bit of the past, a survivor of an apocalypse finds himself trapped.

Spoiler alert: you’re going to die.

It could be quick – a sneaky brain aneurysm that shuts you off like a light switch. Or maybe it’ll be the slow torture of terminal illness. Or a sudden, tragic accident. But whatever the fates hold in store, you’ll have to face it. Eventually. That’s one of the reasons horror is such a beloved genre. It’s our morbid fascination of watching the human animal in its death throes… and wondering how we ourselves will fare.

Written by talented screenwriter Chris Keaton, Trapped is just such a tale. Bleak. Grim. Depressing. And you won’t be able to turn your eyes away.

In the indeterminate future, society’s collapsed. Dave’s been struggling to survive ever since. Wandering through desolate terrain. Scavaging. Surviving by any means necessary. Which has worked… at least, until now. In a lightening quick moment of lousy luck, he finds himself trapped in an abandoned garage; pinned under an engine block at the bottom of a pit. Unless a miracle happens, Dave’s reached The End.

There’s no chance of medical care. Wild dogs prowl outside. And he hasn’t seen another human being in months. But when a small group of travelers discover Dave’s predicament, it looks like he might be saved! But is it the help he was praying for? Or something else entirely?

Much like The Walking Dead (and other post-apocalyptic tales), Trapped is framed against the death of society. But the story itself is far more personal. Surprisingly uplifting in certain ways, it’s about facing your own mortality. And appreciating the small joys of life… while you can.

Horror and thriller indie directors take note: the potential for great performances in this one is vast. A small cast – no FX. All that’s needed is someone with the vision to bring it to screen. Grab this little gem while you can.

Or you can ignore it. It’s your funeral.

Pages: 7

Budget: Mid-range. Set in an automotive garage, there are a few “equipment” requirements. But nothing that would break the bank. (Especially if you’re pals with a local mechanic!)

About the writer: Chris Keaton is an Air Force veteran living with his family in sunny Arizona. He’s primarily a screenwriter, but he does love diving into prose. He has had several short screenplays produced and go on to win awards. He’s optioned a few features screenplays and currently has a thriller feature in post-production. A young-adult novel based on one of his screenplays is soon to be released. You can see some of his projects on his website, Chris-Keaton.com or follow him on Facebook at Facebook.com/ChrisKeaton.

About the reviewer: Pete Barry is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright, actor, director and musician. His short plays have been published in numerous collections. He’s also a cofounder of the Porch Room, a film and theater production company, website available at http://www.porchroom.com/. Please feel free to reach out to him with script requests at petebarry27 (a) Hotmail.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

*Fixed the broken link

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    Based on the poem by Lewis Carroll. Through a detective and a reporter's investigations, a young boy's terrifying encounter with an infamous creature takes form. 7 pages
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