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Monday, April 30, 2018

The Tooth Fairy by James Barron – Short Script Review (available for production) - post author LC

THE TOOTH FAIRY by James Barron

An enthusiastic young girl is about to learn the Tooth Fairy always exacts a price.

Childhood can be a magical time. Santa Clause and The Easter Bunny are the obvious standouts, but that special little nocturnal sprite we know as The Tooth Fairy, must also be given honourable mention.

Tinsel, fairy-dust, and chocolate eggs aside, it’s just a little bit creepy when you consider all three of these magical creatures come at night while we are sleeping.

Tradition has it when you lose your milk teeth as a child you should place the tooth under your pillow just before you nod off to sleep. In the morning, if you’re lucky, and you’ve been a good little girl or boy, you will wake to discover a delightful gift, usually one of the monetary kind – a small token symbolizing the beginning of your rite of passage from childhood into adulthood, courtesy of The Tooth Fairy.

Throughout history Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny are depicted in pretty consistent good-guy fashion. The Tooth Fairy however can appear in many different guises – as male, female, with wings or wand, as pixie, dragon, ballerina, bat or rat, and commonly mouse – even, (according to Wiki,) as a ‘potbellied flying man smoking a cigar’! Huh?

Now, that’s really creepy.

Not nearly as creepy and macabre however, as the depiction of the titular character in James Barron’s one-page horror thriller – The Tooth Fairy.

One-page scripts are no easy task for writers but James Barron manages to skillfully weave a fully rounded tale with a shocking twist all in one page.

We open on Minka Avery, an excitable six year old girl (with a gap-toothed smile) waving a twenty-dollar note in front of her parent’s faces.

Look what the Tooth Fairy left! She exclaims.

The astonished looks on both parent’s faces tell us neither one of them left such a gift.

They stare at each other a moment, confused.

So what’s going on here? Where did this little windfall come from?

And why are Dad’s new pliers missing?

Filmmakers, are you looking for a micro-short in the horror genre with a denouement that will make your audience’s toes curl? Perhaps an entry for Shriekfest or Screamfest or one of the many other horror festivals going around? Well, look no further than James Barron’s, ‘The Tooth Fairy’. This is one tale you can definitely sink your teeth into.

Specs: One location, a nice house in the burbs. Four players – Mum, Dad, and a six year old exuberant little actress, and of course The Tooth Fairy – 50s, male.

About the writer: James loves to write comedy and action along with the occasional horror short. You can reach him at jbarron021 (a) gmail.

Read The Tooth Fairy (1 page in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: L. Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Cherry Blossom by Cameron Dueker - post author Don

Cherry Blossom (14 pages in pdf format) by Cameron Dueker

With the Trinity Test failed, two US Marines and two Japanese schoolgirls fight to survive Operation Olympic, the American invasion of Japan.

Listen to the script performed by ScriptWax.Com

About the writer: Cameron Dueker is an ambitious amateur screenwriter by night and high school history teacher by day. He is currently writing shorts for the YouTube cartoon series Car City and developing a graphic novel based on his passion project, a western script entitled, No Beans In The Wheel. When he is not writing he enjoys reading about military history, surfing, day dreaming about improbable new business ideas and sharing his geekier hobbies with his younger daughter. He can be reached at CameronDueker (a) gmail.

The January 2018 Two Week Challenge was a short screenwriting exercise wherein writers are given two weeks to write a short script on the theme and genre provided. These are quickly done and may be a little rough around the edges considering the short time frame in which they are written.

Huge thanks to ScriptWax.Com: Scriptwax Table Reads provides a team of talented voice actors to bring your screenplay to life, so you can hear what works and what doesn’t!

Note: This audio recording is released under a Creative Commons, attribution, noncommercial, no derivatives 3.0 license. You can share the audio recording in its entirety, but you can’t change it or sell it.

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Satnav by Anthony Cawood – Short Script Review (available for production) - post author LC

 

SATNAV by Anthony Cawood

 A woman’s infidelity takes her on an unexpected journey.

Hell Hath No Fury Like A Woman Scorned is how the old adage goes, but the latest research indicates men may in fact be sorer losers when it comes to love and war. Add twenty-first century technology into the mix as the latest weapon of revenge and things can get very dicey indeed.

In Anthony Cawood’s one-page thriller, Satnav, we open on 30-something, Sarah, driving along a deserted patch of road alone and late at night. Sarah’s just punched her location and presumably her destination into a high-tech device some of us like to call a Satnav – otherwise known as a GPS, or navigation assistant.

The question is: will she reach her destination?

She’s just received a text message from her husband, David, and he’s not happy.  Certain revelations regarding Sarah’s extra-curricular behaviour have come to light and it appears she has not been the model of a loving and faithful partner. As the text messages continue to come thick and fast and the Satnav guides Sarah on her journey we wonder will she make it to where she wants to go in one piece?

It’s no easy task to build suspense and create a fully fledged story in one-page but Anthony Cawood negotiates the twists and turns with skill and expertise in this tight micro-short thriller that’ll resonate and pack a punch with audiences.

Filmmakers: We know you have the drive and you’re dying to move off the starting blocks. All you need now is the vehicle. And here it is! Cut and polish in your own inimitable style and Satnav could be your short-cut to guaranteed success.

Specs: One talented 30-something female with a driver’s licence and attitude. A car, a lonely road in the middle of nowhere. A SatNav and accompanying V.O.

About the writer: Anthony Cawood is an award winning screenwriter from the UK with 4 short films produced and another 10 or so scripts optioned and/or purchased. Links to his films and details of his scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Read SatNav (1 page in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: L. Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

An Angel Whispers – Short Script Review - post author Steve Miles

An Angel Whispers by Jeremy Storey

“A cynical reporter investigates a small-town supernatural tale, that can only be believed to be seen.”

Ben is a veteran journalist chasing a story in the heartlands of rural USA. Folk in these parts like to talk of a miracle. The kind that hard-nosed reporters like Ben prefer to avoid. Yet as the investigation leads him from one witness to another it becomes clear that something out of the ordinary happened here.

And while no-one can say for sure what they saw, all are certain of one thing: that what they heard that night was to change their lives forever.

As Ben’s search leads him closer to the truth, he’s forced to accept this story isn’t over. This is more than copy; this is a test of faith. And in order to come to terms with events, Ben must confront the guilt of his own shattered past.

Only then can he believe that a tragedy playing out half the world away has the power to bring about redemption.

Jeremy Storey’s An Angel Whispers is a low budget treat for a director looking to make their mark through a dialogue driven story with real heart and soul. Featuring a handful of key players and a solid mystery at its core, this is a beautifully realized short script with universal appeal and the ideal fare for short film festivals.

About the Writer: Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However, it wasn’t until he graduated University, that he started to dabble in film and stage.

Since then, he’s written feature length screenplays (The Immaculate Secret, Rewind, Pink Slip Party), as well as award-winning short screenplays (Cat & Mouse, Wishbone, Tower of Strength) and award-winning stage plays (Last Cup of Sorrow, Wolves at the Door). For Jeremy, writing is a form of catharsis. His stories clearly reflect his love of exploring emotions, characters, and worlds that only reside in the deepest recess of the imagination. In turn, he hopes what he writes, readers and viewers will find entertaining, compelling and authentic. He can be reached at: jeremystorey at yahoo.

Read An Angel Whispers (20 pages in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: Steve Miles started writing scripts around five years ago after realizing that his social life was vastly overrated. He enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit – from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums. Check out more of his work at sjmilesscripts.webs.com

Friday, April 13, 2018

Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secure – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author Hamish

Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secure by Anthony Cawood

A man discovers his fears could be a blessing when a night cab ride goes horribly wrong.

For many metropolitan workers, their daily commute is damned from the moment they walk out the door.

Overcrowded buses and delayed subway trains are daily demons one can’t escape. Mundane monsters which delight in tormenting travelers – making their day Hell from the start.

But getting a comfortable taxi ride isn’t all that bad – right?

Not if you’re Gareth, the protagonist in Anthony Cawood’s “Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secured.” Upper-middle class and entitled, Gareth’s arrogant – in some ways. But it just takes a small red light to extinguish all that confidence in a puff of smoke.

You see, Gareth suffers from Cleithrophobia – the fear of being locked in. And when his cab starts rolling, the doors lock. A red light indicates the doors are secured, and Gareth’s phobia kicks in – fast.

Cruising along dark streets, Gareth’s cab starts and stops at every traffic light, lengthening the trip and causing yet more concern. And Gareth’s anxieties certainly aren’t helped by unexpected hazards – like idiots who try to reach into the moving car. Or stand clueless in the road.

There’s something not quite right about these “idiots”. Maybe they’re all drunk and celebrating. Or perhaps it’s something more. A danger that’ll make Gareth feel relieved that he’s locked in.

Unless things get even worse…

Budget: Moderate. Just rent a cab for the day. And a few extras as well….!

About the writer: Anthony Cawood is an award-winning and produced screenwriter. He has sold/optioned four feature screenplays, and sold/optioned over forty short scripts, many of which have been filmed. Outside of his extensive screenwriting career, Anthony is also a published short story writer, interviewer and movie reviewer. Links to his films and details of his scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Read Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secure (8 pages in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp (a) gmail. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Requiem – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author Hamish

Requiem by Sylvia Dahlby

A mentally-impaired teen mourns the death of a murdered classmate.

Churches hold a unique role in society: setting the final scene for births and deaths. Those attending such events experience a wild range of emotions – from ebullience to dark distress.

For the characters in Requiem, it’s sadly the blackest of nights. 14 year-old Rose lies motionless in her casket at church. Though now (presumably) at peace, Rose is the victim of a murderous assailant; not yet identified – much less caught. Her only companion in these last hours: developmentally delayed teen boy Elvin, his world rocked by the loss of his closest friend.

When others enter the vestibule, Elvin bolts away.

It’s his mother and the local Father, conversing nervously amongst themselves. About how Elvin’s been reported missing. In fact, he’s disappeared without a trace!

Not long after Elvin’s mother leaves, Rose’s father arrives. A grieving parent on the verge, Peter asks the Father to hear his confession. But when he collapses in the booth – a different voice filters through the screen.

Elvin’s there. Hiding. Ready to admit to certain “sins”:

            ELVIN
     (stuttering)
I did-didn’t me-mean to kill her.

Rose’s father storms out, intent on wreaking his revenge. But can a boy as troubled as Elvin tell the truth – or is he just saying what others want to hear?

Read the story to find out. Offering high drama on a low budget, Requiem is the “holy grail of scripts”: a tale of grief, redemption and revenge. One that – unlike Elvin (and perhaps others) – has absolutely nothing to hide!

Budget: Low. Just some high quality actors (and a church) is all.

About the Writer: I’m a one time advertising copywriter who has fallen in love with screenwriting. I’ve written a handful of features, one has been produced as a Role Playing Game (RPG) and made its debut at CarnageCon. I enjoy writing short scripts since it’s a fun exercise for sharpening my skills; so far one of my shorts has been produced as a student film project, and I welcome the opportunity to have more of my work produced via participation on SimplyScripts. Sylvia can be reached at sylviedahl (a) AOL.

Read Requiem (5 pages in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp (a) gmail. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Yardwork – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - post author Hamish

Yardwork by Marnie Mitchell-Lister

Sometimes, you just can’t take the nagging anymore…

No-one likes doing yardwork.

If someone claims to enjoy it, they’re most likely lying. It’s dull, tedious, and stressful. In other words, it’s no fun.

But then there’s Yardwork – a one-page script by Marnie Mitchell-Lister. A fun, fascinating read, Yard’s as short and brutal as they come.

The premise: a woman’s been gruesomely done-in by her husband. What’s the murder weapon, you ask? A weed-wacker, apparently.

But Sargeant Russo and Officer Jennings are on the case. If anyone’s going to “dig up” the truth, it’s them.

Just imagine all the clues: gory violence. Dark humor. And the most morbid of twists. Even if you’re no fan of the great outdoors, it’s safe to say filming Yardwork would be summer fun.

So put down the Strimmer and pick up a winner. And “grow” your next film project today!

Pages: One. Yes – one!

Budget: Minimal.

About the Writer: Marnie Mitchell-Lister has creative A.D.D. Some of her writing can be read here: BrainFluffs.com. Some of her photography can be seen here: marnzart.wordpress.com.

Read Yardwork (one page in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp (a) gmail. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Grace – short script review – available for production - post author Don

Grace by Jane Therese

When a young singer is mugged, her bravery inspires the teen who robbed her.

A beautiful singing voice is a true gift. It’s not something that can be taught or learned, but with proper training it can be perfected. And if the owner of this incredible gift is brave and confident enough to share it, our ears and souls are blessed.

Sixteen-year-old, Grace, has been given this gift, and she shares it with anyone who has ears. Her voice echoes off the walls of the subway station, momentarily tuning out the sound of screeching metal, turning the grungy surroundings into a concert hall. Her audience is captivated, showing their appreciation by tossing money into her tip bucket. But not everyone is focused on her voice, and in a flash… her money is stolen by a troubled teen, Spike.

Grace is aptly named, as she holds herself that way, despite her many struggles. She washes her clothes at the laundromat, bathes in a gas station bathroom sink, eats left over food from the diner where she works… because Grace is homeless. But her struggles don’t end there, and neither does her run-in with Spike.

Most people are drawn to Grace’s amazing voice, but there is something else that draws Spike toward her. He follows her. Watches her. His rough exterior softens. Grace touches Spike’s soul in a completely different way.

GRACE is a beautiful portrayal of strength, bravery and survival.

Production: Low to moderate. Several locations are involved, including a subway, a diner and a stage, but all can be constructed with a little creativity. The most challenging aspect is to find someone to play Grace.

About the Writer: Jane Therese is an award winning screenwriter and photojournalist living in Bucks County, Pa. Jane moved to the East Coast from Orange County, California in 1976 and fell in love with it’s stimulating richness. Jane’s passion for writing and photojournalism, compelled her to delve deep in her ‘backyard’ for her storytelling. Her features include, The Celery Fields, House of the White Bee, La Llorna, A Day in the Life of Jaime; Breaking the Silence of Autism, to name just a few. Jane continues to spend time dedicated to her craft, continuing to tell stories, shedding light on the human experience and their transformations. Jane can be contacted at: janetheresephoto (a) yahoo

Read Grace (12 pages in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the Reviewer: Marnie Mitchell-Lister has creative A.D.D. Some of her writing can be read here: BrainFluffs.com. Some of her photography can be seen here: marnzart.wordpress.com

Friday, March 30, 2018

Kill Your Demon – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author David M Troop

Kill Your Demon by Dena McKinnon

A troubled man sets out to kill a Demon.
His only problem: the Demon happens to be a Man of God. Or is he?

            JON (V.O.)
Might as well be written in Holy Scripture
that free men have the right to bear arms.

     HANDS put the Glock back together like second nature.

            JON (V.O.)
Never was one to much argue Scripture, but
neither did I ever have much use for a weapon.

     Hands feed bullets into the clip one at a time.

            JON (V.O.)
Until the demons came.

This is just a sampling of the to-die-for dialogue in the opening moments of Kill Your Demon – the newest thriller by screenwriter/filmmaker Dena McKinnon. The script is an intelligent blend of classic noir and psychological thriller – with a dash of supernatural horror. In other words, this one has everything.

Our protagonist Jon is convinced he’s not only seen an actual, straight-from-Hell Demon, but they’ve also conversed and – on numerous occasions – played a friendly game of Scrabble in the social hall of Jon’s church, no less.

How is this possible? It seems the Demon has taken on the appearance of Bishop Tom, a man of the cloth: black suit, white collar, three Hail Mary’s…. the whole package deal. Devilishly sneaky, to say the least.

But can Jon’s perceptions be trusted? After all, he is taking three prescribed medications. Maybe something’s counteracting – in nasty ways?

As the script begins, Jon has appointed himself the official demon-slayer of The Holy Redeemer Church. Like all good Christians, he sets out for community game night with his Bible in one hand and a handgun in the other.

Ultimately, Jon and Bishop Tom find themselves in a showdown over a Scrabble Board. Jon aims his gun at the demon’s belly under the table and waits for the right moment to strike.

Will Jon slay the beast, or murder an innocent priest in cold blood?

Kill Your Demon successfully mixes elements from several genres together for one helluva-good script. Jon’s voice over dialogue is ripped from the pages of a Mickey Spillane detective novel. The words are so gritty, you can hear the sandpaper in Jon’s voice. The Scrabble board standoff is as tense as any Wild West gunfight: two gunslingers with itchy trigger fingers… with the balance of Heaven and Hell at stake. The twist ending’s so good it’s evil. And missing the opportunity to direct this one? In our minds – that would be a sin.

Budget: Moderate. One or two simple FX. A social hall/ rec center location.

About the Writer: Dena McKinnon has had four shorts produced. One of her shorts, The Box, directed by Sascha Zimmermann, has racked up numerous awards and has screened at Comic-Con. Dena has optioned one feature, Doggone, a buddy script cowritten with Kevin Lenihan. Currently, Dena has one feature in production, The Last Call, with Leo-PR, and is writing on assignment for an undisclosed TV producer. Check out Dena’s IMDB Credits. She can also be reached at girlbytheshore (a) hotmail.

Read Kill Your Demons (6 pages in PDF format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

About the reviewer:  David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No.2 pencil. In 2011 he began writing short films for MoviePoet.com and Simplyscripts.com. His produced short scripts include INSOMNIAC and THE DINER. Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie. He can be reached at dtroop506 (a) gmail.

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June 20, 2018

    Falling For The Salsa Beat by Fausto Lucignani

    During a casual encounter, a man and a woman fall for each other while dancing to the electrifying rhythm of Salsa. 9 pages - production: Shoestring Musical Romance.
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