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Thursday, April 6, 2017

Careful What You Wish For – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Zach Zupke

Careful What You Wish For (1 page in pdf format) by Tim Westland

Magic genies and bottles. Such things never end well. Or DO they?

We all know someone who rubs us the wrong way. A friend of a friend. A relative. Or, in some tragic cases… one’s own spouse. Things can get real ugly when two people don’t see eye to eye – especially when divorce looms on the horizon. When that’s the case – it’s no holds barred. War of the Roses. One up-manship – at any cost.

Fortunately, Karma has a way of exacting sweet revenge on those who test its limits. The only trouble with karma is; you never know when it’ll rear its head. But it does – it’s magical.

Which is the case with Tim Westland’s one-pager “Wish.” The script starts with brothers Steve and Bill walking the surf on a sunny Southern California beach. Normally – a pretty enjoyable experience, except for Bill’s sad state of affairs. As they walk, he tells his sibling of his woes: Bill’s wife is divorcing him for half of everything. Plus alimony. And she’s been cheating on him from day one. If ever there was a need to “insert karma here,” this here’s the perfect time.

Bill stubs his toe on something and yelps. What’s this? Bad fortune? Reverse karma?! Nope, it’s the tip of a lamp jutting from the sand. And Bill quickly discovers why it’s been placed in his path.

“I am yours to command,” intones a Genie after Bill gives the lamp a vigorous rub. “You have but one wish, and whatever you receive, your wife will receive twice over.”

Brother Steve advises caution. “Careful, these Genies are a tricky lot.”

Bill doesn’t hesitate. He knows exactly what to wish for. Riches? Perfect health? Unbelievable happiness? But if he gets those – his soon-to-be ex gets double.

So he takes a breath and wishes for… Well, read the script and find out!

Short and sweet, Careful What You Wish For is a great take on an old classic. Perfect for an indie director with imagination – and a humoristic one-two punch!

Budget: Pretty reasonable. A small amount of FX and costumes required.

About the Writer: Tim Westland is an award winning writer whose many scripts have consistently place in the Semi/Quarter finals in Page, Bluecat, and Screencraft. His screenplay, OBeast, co-authored with frequent writing partner Rod Thompson, finished in the Top 10 of ScreenCraft’s 2017 Horror contest. OBeast is also a 2017 iHorror.com finalist. Tim is also the co-author of the acclaimed horror comic/graphic novel (and screenplay), Chasing the Dead, published by IDW.

About the Reviewer: An LA based writer, Zach Zupke can be contacted via email at zzupke “AT” yahoo

Read Careful What You Wish For (1 page in pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Ready or Not – Filmed - posted by Ingrid Short

Ready or Not (pdf format) by Steven Clark

A simple game of hide-n-seek takes a turn for the worst.

Discuss this on the Discussion Board

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The Original Review

Mom and her son play a fun game of hide-and-go-seek. But, what if what you find is not what you were looking for?

This micro short can be as scary as you want to be. Snap this up now.

It’s a perfect weekend shoot and an excellent calling card short film that, as written, can be a family friendly horror comedy or an very un-family-friendly horror.

Pages: 2

Budget: Shoestring budget, two actors – Mom and son, one interior location.

About the writer: Based in upstate, NY, Steven Clark is the writer of over 30 short scripts, several of which are under option, in pre-production, or have already been made into films. On A Clear Night, a family Christmas feature aimed at a Hallmark Channel-type audience, is currently in the works. Steven can be reached at Steamroller138 (a) gmail.

About the reviewer: < crickets >

Read Read or Not (pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, November 4, 2016

How to Pronounce Hawaiian – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

How To Pronounce Hawaiian (pdf format) by Sylvia Dahlby

“A gold-digger makes a friendly wager with her sugar daddy.”

Short and sweet. Less is more. Keep It Simple, Silly (KISS.) In the screenwriting world of character arcs and complex premises, a short and funny story can often be a breath of pure, fresh air…

As it is with Sylvia Dahlby’s efficient two-pager, How to Pronounce Hawaiian. As the script opens, 56 year old Rich and his much young girlfriend Tiffany sit in a convertible, parked in a fast food drive-thru lane. They’re in Hawaii. Somewhere. As Tiffany scours the map, she wonders aloud why Rich grab his trusty GPS. But Rich insists they aren’t lost. On the contrary – he knows exactly where they are. Kealakekua.

Say what?

The word doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue. As the argument deepens, Rich and Tiffany take turns pronouncing the city’s name – each with their own garbled spin. Which inspires Tiffany to offer a small wager. Retrieving a magazine, she flips to a picture of a pearl necklace. If her pronunciation proves correct, Rich will buy the jewelry for her. If his is accurate? Tiffany whispers the offer in his ear. She’ll… well, you know. (Readers – keep those innuendos to yourself, please!)

And with that, the bet is on.

So, how will it end? Far be it from us to spoil the surprise…

Looking for a snappy punchline that’s easy to film? HTPH is your ticket. It’s guaranteed to make you (and your audience) smile. Not to mention attempt to say “Kealakekua” yourself. And Googling “Don Ho.” Say who? We won’t tell.

Pages: 2

Budget: Low, unless you fly to Hawaii and film the fast-food restaurant exterior there. (No little grass shack required.) Three characters round out this story set in paradise. Aloha. 🙂

About the Writer Sylvia Dahlby: I’m a one time advertising copywriter who has fallen in love with screenwriting. I’ve written a handful of features, one has been produced as a Role Playing Game (RPG) and made its debut at CarnageCon. I enjoy writing short scripts since it’s a fun exercise for sharpening my skills; so far one of my shorts has been produced as a student film project, and I welcome the opportunity to have more of my work produced via participation on SimplyScripts. Sylvia can be reached at sylviedahl (a) AOL.

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature.

Read How To Pronounce Hawaiian (pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Run – Short Script Review - posted by Ingrid Short

Run (pdf format) by Victor Miranda

A running athlete has all the motivation he needs to win a race.

This story is particularly resonant in light of the ever increasing refugee crisis.

Our protagonist Mondon, the son of an African farmer, is a runner. But a runner out of necessity when his village is pillaged by mercenaries. He saves the life of an orphaned little girl who is later able to repay the kindness when her circumstances change.

Fleeing his village he lands in a refugee camp where, despite compromised circumstances, he is still able to train. A gift from the little girl he saved gives him the tools to escape and run to something better.

This is a powerful, visceral, and poignant story.

Pages: 4 pages

Budget: Medium Budget. Stock stadium crowd footage, running track, creativity needed with mercenaries. Oh, and a few runners and a little girl.

About the Writer: Victor Miranda hails from Mexico and has a degree in International Relations. He’s written 4 short films and 2 features ones. Next year he plans to submit one of his features to the Black List. Victor can be reached at: vmmr.87 (a) gmail.com

Read Run (PDF format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Someplace Nice and Dark – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Someplace Nice and Dark

A young delivery boy calls on a strange old man harboring a shadowy secret.

Finding a good horror short with something fresh to say can be difficult, to say the least.  Everyone’s seen the proliferation of vampire, slasher, exorcism and zombie scripts ad nauseum.  Is there anything left in this field to explore?

Well, here’s a short that does have something new, creepy and gothic.  Set in a trailer, “Someplace Nice and Dark” revolves around only two characters – Pinto, the urban delivery boy… and a old man who seems to have a strange aversion to the light.  (No, kiddies, this isn’t what you’re thinking.)  Done with the right actors and atmosphere, this is one script that could win some lucky director a horror festival.

About the writer:  Robert Newcomer recently received his first IMDB credit for another short, Them That’s Dead.  An intelligent writer, he has several other shorts and a horror feature length available for consideration. (IMDB credits listed here.)

Budget: Low

Primary Genre: Horror

Page Length: 9 pages

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Friday, August 28, 2015

Cooked – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Cooked

A this-or-that of urban legends as an old cat lady goes about her day. …

There’s something about mixing horror and comedy that just works so well.  You know, like Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – mix chocolate and peanut butter (or is that peanut butter and chocolate?), and the result is better than any single ingredient.  Doubt me on that?  Try some of these titles on for size: Army of Darkness, Shaun of the Dead,  American Werewolf in London (in parts.).  ‘Nuff said.  Game, set and match.

Following in that noble of tradition of laughing at potentially grisly events, Cooked follows the story of little old lady Barbara, as she pulls into her driveway.  Her son Jacob has lent her the family cat for a day of fur-baby sitting – and Barbara’s thrilled.  But, as old people sometimes are (especially in films), Barbara can be a bit… absentminded.  As the script progresses, the feline dangers in house begin to mount.  An open microwave.  Upended knives in the sink.  Will Barbara be a good grand-mamma to little pussy?  Or is there a cat-astrophe in their future?

Give Cooked a read.  It’s a fun little script with a strong ending.  And hey…  any script that endangers a cat is fine with me.

About the writer: Chris Shamburger was a semi-finalist in the 2011 Shriekfest Film Festival and finalist (Top 10) in 2013 for his recently-produced script, Hiccups. He was a semi-finalist in the 2008 Straight Twisted Horror Screenplay Contest and has been published in Twisted Dreams Magazine and Horror in Words. He lives in Marietta, GA with his partner and their Chow-mix rescue, Walter. Aside from writing, Chris has been teaching pre-kindergarten for the past five years.

Pages: 4

Budget: Low budget ; the entire script takes place at a single house (interior and exterior shots.)  One character.  Two, if you count the cat.  Which  is probably the only tricky part.  But that’s what stuffed props are for!! Or housecats you no longer need…

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Freak – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Freak

A simple wave and smile alters the life of a teenager.

High school trauma. The popular kids. The outcasts. The bullies. It’s a theme that’s been deeply explored in movies. The Breakfast Club’s an outstanding example, of course. But the cinematic list goes on and on. Which is only natural. Because finding one’s place in life and surviving the horrors of one’s teens? That’s a human, universal truth. In any generation you care to name.

Take Frank Reak for example (F.Reak, for those slow on the uptake.). Goth. And seventeen. A perfect target for bullying. As the script opens, poor Frank’s taking a toilet face bath in the men’s bathroom – courtesy of one of the all-stars of the football team.

The jock calls him a freak, and walks away. Leaving Frank simmering.

Later in the day, their paths cross again. This time, Mr. Jock’s on the field – celebrating his latest victory. And Frank’s in the stands with the rest of the geeks of the school band. Playing guitar on the sidelines.

And hiding a gun in the amplifier.

Will this end in tragedy? Another school shooting – more victims? Or does fate have something more in mind. For Frank. And his future…?

A micro short, Freak packs a lot of emotion into a single page. Perfect for a director on a mini-budget. But looking for maximum impact.

About the writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

Pages: 1

Budget: Pretty minor. Two settings. A number of extras for the football game.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sunday, November 23, 2014

The Brightest Star – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by KP Mackie

Breaking announcement: A hearty STS congratulations to Lee O’Connor.  The Brightest Star has now been optioned!!  We’ll provide additional news as production progresses.  For anyone who likes what they see here, give Lee a shout out at lee.a.oconnor “AT” gmail and see what else he has available!

**********

The Brightest Star

“Losing somebody you love isn’t easy. Look up at the brightest star and remember them.”

Life is messy. We’re not talking day to day trials and tribulations. More like the big picture. The “None of us gets outta here alive” sort of stuff.

Movies about death and dying are instant drama, custom-made to tug at one’s heartstrings. It’s tough enough to deal with it as an adult. But inject a child into the situation? Guaranteed there won’t be a dry eye in the house.

In The Brightest Star, a young family faces a life-threatening illness. To five year old James, death is a just a concept he’s not old enough to comprehend. So his parents, Mary and Paul, opt to provide the boy with the perfect visual substitution. Stars. As Mary explains to her son, “Stars are where we go when we pass away.”

And that, James can understand. Happy with his mother’s answer, he draws a picture of Planet Earth – filling the dark sky above with stars, and leaving just enough space for “Grandma and Grandpa.” But for Mary and Paul, the reality is far more complicated. And far too soon, Grandpa and Grandma’s stars will be joined by a third…

Simply written, TBS is a straightforward, touching story. One in which the subtext speaks volumes. One with a compelling, universal topic… witnessed through the eyes of a five year old. And a smart script for any director interested in meaningful drama shorts.

About the writer, Lee O’Connor:
I am a writer from the UK for the screen and theatre. I have written several shorts which are in various stages of production. I am currently in the process of writing a feature film which will be shot in L.A early next year. Alongside that, I am in the process of working on two feature films which the genre and subject will remain a mystery.

I like to tackle subject matters that will pull on the heart strings, educate and open a your eyes. Although these genres are at the opposite ends of the spectrum I predominately write drama and sci-fi. I believe you write with what you know, so be yourself and don’t try to mimic another film or script you have read, create your own voice. I am reachable via email: lee.a.oconnor “AT” gmail

Pages: 3

Budget: Basic. A living room, bedroom and hallway interiors. One exterior shot in a garden. Three actors with lots of heart. And a telescope for looking at stars.

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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