SimplyScripts.Com Logo

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

The Bridge – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author Hamish

The Bridge
There are over 600,000 bridges in the U.S. alone.
Four friends discover the horror that lurks beneath one of them.

We all remember that day in high school when your first friend obtained their driving license. All the locked doors of the world opened up wide for you and your gang. Leaving… no limits where you could go.

Well, unless the car stops working.

In The Bridge, this unwelcome situation is exactly where our four teenage adventurers find themselves: Billy (the driver), Shawn, Mark, and Katie.

As Fate would have it, they’ve broken down at the end of a rusty, metallic bridge. On a wet, cold night. It’s a bad situation, to say the least.

As it turns out, the mechanical illness that’s befallen their vehicle isn’t easily curable. All four tires are flat. Immediately, confusion reigns:

MARK
What’d you run over?

BILLY
Nothing! This is bullshit!

Requiring relief (both physically and mentally), Mark separates himself from the group, and finds an ideal spot over a railing in the center of the bridge.

Little does he know that’s the last time he’ll ever pee.

Thanks to the lack of lighting, the others don’t even know Mark’s disappeared. At least, until Katie realizes the sound of liquid has stopped.

So she goes over to the same spot.

And suffers the same fate as Mark.

Meanwhile, an oblivious Billy and Shawn argue over what their next course of action should be. When they finally reach a consensus, and call out to the others, they find silence. No answer comes.

So they walk across the bridge to find…

Will Billy and Shawn be the next victims? Can they escape a watery, bloody fate? What’s the actual danger that lurks in the dark? You’ll have to read this one and see.

Don’t let the single setting fool you. The sheer simplicity of this script offers horror directors endless creative possibilities. Pick this one up, and Bridge the gap between yourself and your next festival award!

Pages: 7

Budget: As with many horrors, directors have a choice to go for lots of FX, or imply things with atmosphere and shadows. The result: different possible budgets. It just depends where one wants to go.

About the Reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the Writer: Jordan became addicted to writing in 1995, when as a wee lad, his work garnered recognition among his professors. Since that time, he’s written several short scripts that have been received as “life changing”, “prophetic”, and “orgasmic”. As a finalist in the 72 Hour Script Fest, his words gave birth to the award winning film, Made For Each Other. Jordan doesn’t usually refer to himself in the third person, but when he does, he tends to embellish as evidenced above. He does however encourage people to make the world a better place by educating them through his writing, photography, and filmmaking. Please contact him at JLScripts79 at gmail dot com.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author wonkavite

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow
A bad marriage can turn some people into monsters…

Ever wonder how the most famous couples in fiction made it work after happily ever after? Couples like Tarzan and Jane, Anna and Kristoff, or… Frankenstein and his bride? Well, it might not be as blissful as you’d imagine.

That’s just where we meet Frankenstein and his bride in Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow: in marriage counseling, years after Mary Shelley’s story. Hey, even monsters have problems. He’s distant and literally emotionless, she’s tired of doing the same old things and just wants to go on a killer date (pun intended).

One thing they do agree on: they might be unhappy, but they’re not ready to be separated. “We were literally made for each other” Frankenstein pleads. So the marriage counselor dives in and a really monstrous couples therapy session begins.

As the truth comes out and secrets are revealed, the monster and his bride near a breakthrough… but it seems that every step forward leads to the couple taking two steps back. Will they make it? Not to spoil anything, but this story ends with a nice surprise… and this script is a bloody good time.

Pages: 8

Characters: 3 – Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, marriage counselor

Budget: Low to Mid. Really only two locations, three actors, but you may have to increase the makeup budget to make sure your Stein’s look appropriately gory. That being said, an experienced director with a great crew can make this one look hideous (in the best possible way!)

About the Reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the Writer, Dave Lambertson: I took up writing rather late in life having already been retired before I put pen to paper (okay – finger to computer key) for the first time. My favorite genres to read and write are dramedies and romantic comedies.

In addition to this short, I have written four features; “The Last Statesman” (a 2015 PAGE finalist and a Nicholl’s and BlueCat quarterfinalist), “The Beginning of The End and The End” (a PAGE Semi-Finalist). Taking Stock (a drama) and a new comedy – “Screw You Tube”. Want to learn more? Reach Dave at dlambertson “AT” hotmail! And visit his website at http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, July 8, 2016

Grammar Nazi Killer – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author wonkavite

Grammar Nazi Killer
Your next grammatical error may be your last.

Okay, I’ll admit it. My high school grammar skills might be a little rusty. I may end a sentence with the occasional preposition. And I have been known to allow my participles to dangle in public. But, hey, no one’s perfect.

There is one place, it seems, the world’s worst grammatical offenders gather in droves – the internet. More specifically, social media.

Let’s face it. Most of the people on Facebook are not playing with an unabridged dictionary.

Grammar Nazi Killer, the new short script by James Barron, introduces a new villain to the slasher horror genre. A psychopath who kills in the name of proper sentence structure. A murderer who butchers those who butcher the English language. A monster who trolls the internet searching for his next illiterate victim.

True to the genre, our protagonists are a group of high school teens whose only crimes are stupidity and the overwhelming desire to investigate loud noises and dark rooms. And, of course, committing a grammatical error or two on-line.

Our first victim is Dwight, a normal, every-day kid who loves to watch porn in his basement. In his defense, I’m sure he’s limited to an hour, and only if his homework is finished. Imagine his surprise when a message flashes on his screen and it’s not an ad for horny housewives.

“Your writing is an affront to Grammar and the English language. Prepare to die!”

Spoiler alert, Dwight! Zip it up and get the hell out of there!

Amber Swift, a beautiful, blonde airhead Skypes with her hunky quarterback boyfriend Jason when she receives the same message on her computer after making the fatal flaw of being too cutesy with her word usage. After Amber’s error is “corrected,” Grammar Nazi Killer sets his sights on Jason. Will Jason be the next victim of bad grammar? Or can he somehow escape with his subject and predicate intact?

Grammar Nazi Killer is a horror script with its tongue firmly in cheek. Until it’s chopped off. Directors who are fans of the slasher genre should definitely take a stab at this one. This script is bloody good all the way to the last cut.

Pages: 14

Budget: Moderate. Not a big cast, but lots of gory FX. If you happen to have a couple barrels of blood in your basement, you’re half way there.

About the Reviewer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, and this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

About the Author: Newly discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Jessica’s Window – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - post author Dane Whipple

Jessica’s Window
What secrets lie in the attic?

From a dusty and barren attic, thirteen-year-old Jessica Campell watches as her father packs their belongings into a U-Haul van. Tears stream down her face.

Her father, Mark Campell, is obviously no stranger to heartache himself. The dark circles under his eyes reveal he has spent many a night awake, nursing a hidden pain.

As Mark and his wife Laura make final preparations to depart, Jessica pounds relentlessly on the attic window, calling desperately to her parents. But no matter how hard she pounds or loud she cries, her parents can’t or won’t listen. Slowly, they drive away.

But despite being imprisoned, Jessica soon discovers she’s not alone. In the shadows of the attic, she’s met by eleven-year-old Sarah Meyers, a waif of a girl who assures Jessica things will get better. The two of them – she claims – will be good friends. But Sarah’s words are less than reassuring. As police cars and a news crew gather outside, Jessica’s concerns continue to grow.

What could have made Jessica’s parents leave her behind? Soon after the two meet, an eerie presence starts to stir… Just what is happening? Are these children even alone?

A surreal emotion-driven supernatural narrative in the vein of The Others and The Lovely BonesJessica’s Window is a suspenseful, masterfully-written drama. The script manages to land an array of emotional punches, each one landing harder than the first. All of which culminates in a surprise final twist that will leave audiences speechless.

Audiences and critics will be hooked from the get-go. It’s exactly the kind of impassioned, poignant, character-driven drama that reaps gold on the festival circuit.

So directors – act fast. This one won’t be gathering dust in the attic for long.

Pages: 5

Budget: Medium. Suburban setting, police cars, and a news crew.

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple something, something Danger Zone. He is currently working on that screenplay everybody keeps talking about: The Wild Age. Contact him at dane.whipple (AT) live.com

About the writer, Marnie Mitchell Lister: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at brainfluffs.com. Marnie’s had multiple shorts produced and placed Semi-final with her features in BlueCat.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Someplace Nice and Dark – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - post author wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Someplace Nice and Dark

A young delivery boy calls on a strange old man harboring a shadowy secret.

Finding a good horror short with something fresh to say can be difficult, to say the least.  Everyone’s seen the proliferation of vampire, slasher, exorcism and zombie scripts ad nauseum.  Is there anything left in this field to explore?

Well, here’s a short that does have something new, creepy and gothic.  Set in a trailer, “Someplace Nice and Dark” revolves around only two characters – Pinto, the urban delivery boy… and a old man who seems to have a strange aversion to the light.  (No, kiddies, this isn’t what you’re thinking.)  Done with the right actors and atmosphere, this is one script that could win some lucky director a horror festival.

About the writer:  Robert Newcomer recently received his first IMDB credit for another short, Them That’s Dead.  An intelligent writer, he has several other shorts and a horror feature length available for consideration. (IMDB credits listed here.)

Budget: Low

Primary Genre: Horror

Page Length: 9 pages

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Ten Thousand Souls – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author wonkavite

Ten Thousand Souls
In England’s darkest hour of the 1300’s, a Doctor makes a deal with Death Himself

What would you do if the Grim Reaper came a knockin’? If you’re Bill and Ted, you go on a Bogus Journey… Only a few of you will get that reference, but it’ll kill (pun intended) those of you that do.

What if, instead, you made a deal with the Reaper? IE: the Harbinger of Death? That is the very question asked in the script Ten Thousand Souls, penned by apt scribe Marnie Mitchell-Lister.

We meet Doctor Oliver Blackburn in 1900, visiting a gravely ill patient. Sadly, there doesn’t seem to be much that can be done. So Doctor Blackburn offers to sit with the man until his time comes – and he “goes”.

Sweet, right? Not so fast. Because soon as the man passes, Doctor Blackburn… well, let’s just say, “makes his move”..

Throughout Ten Thousand Souls, Doctor Blackburn narrates our story, keeping us hooked as we jump through centuries (from 1350 to 1970 to 2011). Twists and turns abound until our journey is brought to a satisfying – albeit tragic – end.

A script with multiple advantages, Ten Thousand has the potential to play well to the festival and awards crowd, but to help make a name for a director looking for their start.

Blue Oyster Cult once sang “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper”Ten Thousand Souls reminds us that maybe, just maybe, we should.

Pages: 6

Budget: Notable. There are several time jumps (from 1350 to 2011 and a few in between). It also has multiple settings. However, there are only a few characters (Doctor Blackburn and Death most prominently) which lessens the budget a smidge. There are, of course, some effects that will be necessary to bring this tale to life on screen. That said, a clever director with a set, access to some costumes and some loyal actors could likely make this work for less. Anyway, what are you doing reading this? Contact Marnie and get this thing made!

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the author – An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at http://brainfluffs.com/. Marnie’s had 5 shorts produced (so far) and placed Semi-final with her features in Bluecat.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, May 23, 2016

Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author wonkavite

Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse
Life after the zombie apocalypse is harsh and uncompromising. But for two stoners holed up in an apartment with a lifetime supply of weed, it’s more like an inconvenience.

Remember when Seth Rogen and Co. faced the biblical apocalypse in This Is the End? A few of them stumbled successfully through doomsday, but how would they fare if they were faced with a zombie apocalypse instead? This is the very question asked by James Barron’s The Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse.

The answer? Not too well. Not at all.

Faced with Z Day and barricaded in their dorm, three friends (Mark, Steve and Liam) find themselves in a terrible pickle when their food runs out, leaving them starving and trapped – or worse. They intensely debate what to do: Steve and Liam vote to hold out one more day… aided by hits from their favorite bong. But Mark, the sensible non-stoner, insists they need to send someone outside to gather supplies and do recon. But who should be the lucky one?

Borrowing a cue from This Is the End, the trio draw toothpicks: he who pulleth the shortest stick is doomed to venture into the great unknown. Unfortunately for Mark, he’s inevitably chosen to leave for the munchie run – through a terrifying, zombified world.

What happens next? Well, without spoiling the finish, things go about as well as can be expected. And definitely not as planned.

A fun, chuckle-a-minute script, Slacker’s Guide has lots of things: stoner humor, Millennial appeal – and zombie action (no kidding). Scoop this up now… or wait until you take another hit from your bong for creative inspiration.

Fair warning though: act fast. This script might be picked up faster than a bag of Doritos in a stoner’s dorm.

Budget: Mid to high. A few locations (dorm room, hallway, stairway, food store). Lots of zombies, three good buddies and some props. Although, if you’re packing weed, you’ve got one of the major props covered already.

Pages: 14

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts) offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts “AT” gmail and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer, James Barron: Newly discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Friday, May 20, 2016

Course Listing Unavailable – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author Hamish

Course Listing Unavailable
An ambitious student signs up for an internship program promising real world, hands-on experience. Who knew bloodthirsty demons would be involved?

For today’s youth, the challenge of getting a good job has never been tougher. Many are determined to do anything that will enhance their resumes in the eyes of employers. Taking “useful” classes, getting internships, and doing extra-curricular activities are just a few examples of what diligent individuals do to spruce up that valuable sheet of paper.

The protagonist in Course Listing Unavailable, 17-year-old Gortat Emmanuel, is just another determined Ivy League freshman with a whiff of intelligent innocence about him. A mix-up in paying the tuition has meant he’s one class short of the minimum semester credit, and so he sees a counselor to get into a subject that appeals to him.

But every time the counselor enters the course he wants, there’s a problem.

Organic Chemistry? Unavailable. Biology? Unavailable. Ecology? Yup…unavailable. As a last resort, the advisor offers Gortat a chance for some real world experience: a month shadowing a service professional. Because the last guy who did it dropped out.

That’s all the information available. Apart from a name: Mr Shephard. Despite this, Gortat accepts, still eager to learn. And so on his first day, he’s dressed up as if he’s the President attending their inauguration.

However, Gortat’s destination isn’t as beautiful as the White House. Unless you’re into dilapidated buildings and tales of wasted lives in needle format littering the ground.

And the professional isn’t some smarmy doctor. Turning up in a classic American muscle with uninviting objects abundantly decorating the interior, Max Shephard invites Gortat in for his “education”. There’s no textbooks. No worksheets either. There’s only one rule, and it ain’t a typical one:

MAX
…no matter what happens
you will not puke in this car.

This may sound easy enough to obey until Max’s profession is revealed…demon hunter. Not quite what our Ivy League kid was expecting. In addition, it transpires that the supposed dropout dropped out of life…unwillingly. Oh, and for his first day on the job, he’s got to complete a practical helping Max eradicate the beast responsible for failing the previous student. Turns out “real world experience” means “other world experience” in this case.

Will Gortat pass his practical? Will he break the one rule? Will he even survive? Only one thing’s assured: direct this one well, and judges at film festivals will be giving you full marks!

Pages: 16

Budget: Okay, there’s a bit of FX involved in here. But nothing a skilled director can’t – and won’t want to – tackle!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Popped – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - post author wonkavite

Popped
A young man wakes up to find himself trapped in a cell.
With fellow prisoners that refuse to explain – or escape.

Six people awaken to find themselves trapped in a pit with little recollection of how they got there… or how to escape. No, this isn’t the SF film Cube.

This is Popped – a thrilling, quirky sci-fi script. One with yet more stakes at play.

Jimmy, the central character in Popped, faces a more dire dilemma than the characters of Cube. You see, he tries to escape (naturally), but receives no help from his companions; dismal denizens of the pit. What’s actually going on? What did Jimmy and the others do to deserve their fate?

Speaking of his cellmates, what do these people know that Jimmy doesn’t? And why is it they won’t tell?

Such questions form the mystery at the forefront of this tense tale. And, in a short (get it?) amount of time, things become horrifyingly clear…

Don’t worry, I won’t spoil the ending. But Jimmy finally receives help from another prisoner: an older man named Paulo. And that’s when things turn real grotesque. We get some answers and they’re… not pretty.

If it seems I’m being coy, I am. Like any Mystery/SF, Popped works best when you have no idea where it’s going. But have no doubt, there’s twists and turns… and a shockingly original ending that’ll have you gasping and chuckling at the same time.

And once you’ve seen what’s coming, movie night may never be the same…

Budget: Mid-range. 6 actors, and four settings: A hole. A living room and kitchen. As for the effects: A savvy director can use the “less is more” approach when filming horror, so the budget there ‘just depends.’)

Pages: 11

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts) offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts “AT” gmail and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer, Michael Cornetto: Michael is a graduate of the New York School of Television Arts and has been screenwriting since 2005. A number of his short scripts have been produced and several have played the festival circuit… with over 70,000 views on Youtube. Drop Michael an email at mcornetto “AT” hotmail!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Search with Google

    Custom Search SimplyScripts

Subscribe to the SimplyScripts mailing list

    Email Address

Featured SimplyScripts Blogs

ScriptSearch

Advertisement

More Navigation

Latest Entries

Categories

Script of the Day
July 19, 2018

    Mr. Bellamin's Kindergarten Class by Rodney Ohebsion

    An Adult Swim style animated series about an opinionated, unfiltered, divorced 40 year old kindergarten teacher who educates his students in an unconventional manner. In each episode, he teaches a new subject to the class--for instance, in the pilot, he teaches them economics, and he covers things like alimony, interest rates, plumbers overcharging customers, the role golddiggers have in the economy, etc. 14 pages
    Discuss it on the Forum

    *Randomizer code provided by Cornetto.

Advertisement

Donate


Advertisement



Writers I dig

Search Amazon

Search Sheet Music




SimplyScripts Logo
Comodo SSL