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Friday, December 23, 2016

The Gifted Photographer – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by LC

The Gifted Photographer (pdf format) Ian J. Courter

A photographer pays a house-call to shoot a family portrait where his true talent becomes apparent.

Photographs, those treasured mementos of our lives – they can chart a life from birth through to adulthood, and beyond. We keep photos in our wallets, in lockets around our necks, in photo-frames by our bedside tables. Photographs allow us to freeze moments – to travel back in time.

The Gifted Photographer is set towards the end of the Victorian era. At first glance it conjures Great Britain, but America had its own Gilded Age, most notably in the regions of New England and the Deep South. Think Gothic Architecture, the Women’s Suffragette Movement, Republican domination, and literary greats such as Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain. This was also a period characterized by high society and strict morality.

Ian J. Courter manages beautifully to evoke the images of the time – the cobblestone streets, horse drawn carriages and top-hats.

Photography at this time was in its infancy – there was no such thing as the ‘Selfie’ and no such thing as Instagram or Snapchat. The taking of photographs, in particular portraits, was only ever done for special occasions.

The story opens on Michael Houtman, the titular photographer of the piece. Herbert and Margaret Jaffe have requested his services for a very special family portrait with their daughter, Linda. Michael strikes up a conversation with Linda and discovers this sweet young woman suffered a nasty spill on the ice a few months ago. The accident has left her sickly and confined to a wheelchair, but this morning she wakes to a perfect Spring day feeling better than she has in a long time – and she’s ready for her close-up.

But this is no ordinary day, no ordinary photo-shoot, and no ordinary photographer…

Far be it for me to shed too much light, or bring into focus the darker themes and rich cultural history explored in The Gifted Photographer, suffice to say the Latin phrases Ars moriendi and Memento mori both give clues into a not so well known practice explored in this unique tale.

Of course, all you have to do to find out more is read the script. You’ll not only discover the secret talent The Gifted Photographer possesses, but will also uncover the talent of writer Ian J. Courter.  

With an ending that will stay with you long after the lights come up (we recommend reading it at night) and a final sting in the tail you won’t see coming, we advise you to get The Gifted Photographer in the can quick as a flash, before somebody else snaps it up.

Pages: 8

Budget: A little will be needed to make this one period.  But given what you get in the return, it’s definitely worth it!

About the writer: Ian J. Courter has an academic and technical-writing background, and is published in both fields, so a shift to another form of writing seemed natural. He strives to combine his writing skills with nearly two decades of military experience to develop screenplays with vivid locations and in-depth, realistic characters. What started as a hobby quickly became a passion.  In only a few short years, he has written three feature-length screenplays and nine short scripts.  He currently has several feature-length scripts in various stages of development and continually seeks inspiration for more. His email address is ian.j.courter “at” gmail.com.

About the reviewer: L. Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.

Read The Gifted Photographer (pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, October 24, 2016

Allured – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Rustom Irani

Allured (pdf format) by Pii (Π) Anttonen

An eerie castle, dribbling candles, a lost officer and a bunch of ghosts. You know… the usual stuff.

“What is a ghost? A tragedy condemned to repeat itself time and again?” – From Guillermo Del Torro’s “El Espinazo Del Diablo”

There’s something truly tragic about Ghosts. More than zombies, monsters and human serial kllers, ghosts feed on a viewer’s empathy. Phantasms that were once human… now condemned to suffer in eternity. When faced with a creature such as this, how can one not feel sympathy?

Especially with classic ghost tales, like Allured. Set in an Austrian castle, the script opens as Sergeant Franz stumbles to the door, battle beaten and weary. Although Franz is a stranger to the household, old servant Frederich lets him in – offering shelter from the war. The caretaker leads Franz towards an upstairs bedroom. He’s watching it for his master’s return, he tells his guest. They’re the sole inhabitants of the castle: Franz is sure to get some uninterrupted sleep.

Or will he?

Shortly after turning in for the night, Franz encounters a strange woman in his bed.* When he attempts to wake her, his hand goes through her body! He races to Frederich’s quarters to inform him of the intruder. But Frederich insists it was a dream – and implores the sergeant to go back to sleep. Needless to say, sleep proves to be… elusive. When Franz returns to his room, the woman is gone. But children’s footsteps echo in the hall. And then there are the sounds downstairs. Almost like a – party? Franz heads for the dining room to confront his fears, unsure what he’ll find…

Though once a staple of the horror genre, ghost stories have become a rare breed. Stylishly written with a touch of humor, Allured harkens back to a classier time in movies. When films were shot in black and white… and curtains blowing in the breeze brought a tingle to one’s spine. Perhaps that time has come again: in a cinematic world filled with slasher and torture porn shorts, Allured would be sure to stand out in festivals!

* Sleeping. That’s it! This is a classic ghost tale, folks – get your minds out of the gutter!

Pages: 8

Budget: Not quite as impossible as it seems. While the castle location, costumes and extras may seem daunting for production purposes, there are plenty of possible “cheats.” If skillfully applied, stock footage, generic “stone wall” spaces and just a touch of camera tricks could be all the set you need!

About the writer: Pii Anttonen (first name pronounced like Π, not like the bathroom activity) was previously known by some other name and while being being busy with that, edited the Voice Over online scriptwriting magazine, worked on several virtual shows, won a Simply Scripts One Week Challenge once and had some shorts produced. These days her writing duties consist mainly of writing on commission for production companies and groups, knowing full well that it’s unlikely that anything will see the light of day, but accepts that that kind of is what the scriptwriting job is. She can be reached at pii.anttonen (a) gmail.com!

About the reviewer: A film and video aficionado based in Mumbai, Rustom Irani works as a freelance editor and screenwriter for projects ranging from narratives, commercials, and documentaries to corporate and music videos. His website is available at PlanetRusty.com, and he can be reached at rustyirani “AT” gmail.com!

Read Allured (pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Forget-Me-Not – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

Laptop-Shorts

Forget-Me-Not

“A troubled inner city youth liberates a forgotten community garden, unlocking a magic that reconnects his neighbors with their lost loved ones.”

When you think about it, every story at its heart is drama. By their very nature, they require a dramatic force to keep their audience’s attention: characters struggle – clash against others, providing conflict. Ebb and flow. Back and forth. There’s a rhythm to telling a riveting tale – no matter the supposed “genre.”

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist/author Anna Quindlen once wrote “Every story has already been told.” If so – how do you make YOUR drama unique? One method is to swirl additional genres into the mix. Do it right, and you’ll have a winning recipe on your hands!

And that’s the appeal of Steven Dexheimer’s inner-city story, Forget-Me-Not. On the surface, it’s a drama about troubled 16-year old Michael who lives in the tenements. His four friends aren’t exactly a gang, but peer pressure’s a powerful force on the street. Michael wants to fit in, but he’s got an interest far outside their sphere; he’s been spotted in the neighborhood community garden with Mrs. Friedman, an elderly lady who’s as far away from “ghetto” as one can be (at least outside of Ikea).

When Mrs. Friedman falls ill, paramedics load her into an ambulance. A nosy neighbor recognizes Michael as a frequent visitor to the garden, and starts asking him questions. In front of his friends.

Michael visits Mrs. Friedman in the hospital. She asks him a favor; care for the garden while she’s away. A good kid, Michael does what he can… but falls afoul of his old gang, who take a dim view of Michael’s new “hobby.” As the garden grows, so does the animosity – forcing Michael to choose between new allegiances and old, in a world where very few good things grow….

What makes Forget Me Not a stand-out script? Let’s pluck those petals and count the ways:

Friendship (and a touch of lost romance): Mrs. Friedman’s love for her dear departed “Stanley” (symbolized by the blue flowers she nutures in the garden), and the bond that forms between her and the teen.

Crime: A gritty inner city setting – depicting “thug life” and its very real consequences.

Fantasy: Though “rooted” in reality, something magical happens in the community garden. Affecting far more than the flowers…

Poignantly written, Forget Me Not weaves these themes together seamlessly – creating a fresh story of hope, community and friendship. If you’re a director looking for a story with substance, then F-M-N should be directly in your line of sight. Visually compelling with dramatic impact. You’d better act now – before this one’s off the market…!

About the writer:Steven was a finalist in the coWrite competition, an innovative community-sourced screenplay developed in association with respected production company Benderspink (A History of Violence, The Butterfly Effect). He also took 1st Place honors in the March 2009 MoviePoet short script competition.

Steven is a member of Writer’s Boot Camp, was a finalist in the 2008 The Movie Deal screenplay competition and has twice been a finalist in the NYC Midnight Screenwriting Competition (2007 & 2008). He holds a Bachelors degree in Theater and an Associate degree in Film/Video Production. More of Steven’s work may be found at his website: www.StevenDexheimer.com (email: Steven “AT” 8mdFilms.com)

Pages: 14 pages

Budget: Moderate, but not pricey. And definitely worth the investment. An establishing shot may be enough to set up the inner city neighborhood, hospital, and high school. An actual or imitation hospital room, classroom and bedroom shouldn’t take much of a bite from the budget. Almost an ensemble piece, there are several main characters – all likely coveted roles – plus some extras to act as neighbors. But get yourself a good garden. Because it’s a star of this show, as well.

About the reviewer for Forget-Me-Not:California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Black SUV – Short Script Review - posted by simplyscriptshorts

Black SUV
A secret service agent is forced to question her morality when she realizes the mysterious man she’s assigned to protect is pure evil.

“Many lick before they bite.”

Such is the epigraph of the gritty and quirky Black SUV, written by CJ Walley.

And if that quote doesn’t sound mysterious to you, you’ve gotta check out the script itself. Not to mention, check to see what’s up with you!

Going by the name of (surprise!) Mr. Black, we’re introduced to the titular character very much enjoying himself in the boot of his shadowy vehicle; parked not-so-innocently in the club district of New Orleans.

Dressed like a VIP and loving life at 50, the man’s got a few “errands” to run before the evening’s pleasures end.

However, he’s not gonna be driving this night.

No, Mr. Black has his own chauffeur and bodyguard, Eris. As sharply dressed as her enigmatic passenger, it’s Eris’ first time behind Black’s wheel.

As you’d expect a good boss to do, Mr. Black quickly segueways from professional instruction to a candid conversation with his new employee. Almost too candid, in fact.

And as Mr. Black engages in bizarre encounters with local down-and-outs, it becomes ever clearer that he doesn’t really need a bodyguard. At all.

Even so, Eris is constantly aware of her duties: “obedience and vigilance”, above all else.

Her willingness to fulfill those duties will be tested to the limits as she shuttles Mr. Black to his final errand; before their confusing night comes to a close…

With an unresolved cliffhanger and one of the most unforgettable pairs of characters you’ll likely ever see in a short, Black SUV takes an initially familiar story – and twists it into a gripping, original, one-of-a-kind premise.

It’s your duty to read this brilliant script. Like Eris soon discovers, it’s usually best to “do one’s job.”

Pages: 9

Budget: Reasonable. Rent an SUV, some believable actors and you’re set.

About the Reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer, C.J. Walley: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write new specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producers, directors, and actors in LA, NYC, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington DC, Zurich, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Dallas while occasionally blogging for Stage 32. If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Thursday, August 25, 2016

I Can See You – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

 

Laptop-Shorts

I Can See You

While delivering the mail, a joyless postal worker begins to see messages in the form of graffiti, then the seemingly harmless words take a dark turn.

There’s something about quirky scripts that’s just – charming.  Both to indie audiences and script reviewers.  Think about it: Juno.  Scott Pilgrim Saves the World.  Napoleon Dynamite.  Seven Psychopaths. Sure, raw drama has its place. But write something with character and a touch of mystery?  When done right, the result is magic… a film that’ll stay with your viewers long after the lights have gone up and the curtain down.

A solid example of that genre, I Can See You tells the tale of sad sack mail worker Carson Fox. Beaten down by life, Carson lives with his no-good brother Frank and Shelby (Frank’s too-good-for-him wife.) Though secretly crushing on Shelby, Carson knows he has no chance.  But Carson’s fate is about to change.  Assigned a new postal route, Carson starts to see strange signs… cryptic messages painted on the sidewalk and walls. Telling him how to win Shelby. Urging him towards other – darker – things.  Has Carson finally gone postal? Or is there meaning behind the madness?

Written with a subtle, humorous touch, I Can See You offers the best of what “quirky” has to offer. A unique premise and memorable/relatable characters.  What more can you ask for in a script?

About the writer: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at brainfluffs.com.  Marnie’s had 5 shorts produced (so far) and placed Semi-final with her features in Bluecat.

Pages: 15

Budget: Medium.  There’s a variety of indoor and outdoor settings in this one… but not all that many characters.  And definitely nothing that requires FX.  Still – it’s not a script that an absolute newbie should attempt.  This one requires a touch of artistic experience.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Friday, July 22, 2016

The Letter – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

The Letter
A captive prisoner makes an unlikely friend. But Wars of Words can be deadly as well….

Fantastical figures fascinate forever. The ogre is a pertinent example: from French folklore to the universally adored Shrek franchise, stories involving ogres have never waned in popularity, especially those that humanize these “monsters”.

The opening situation of The Letter, however, introduces us to a female ogre with no humanity whatsoever. In a dilapidated hut on the tallest mountaintop, where snow falls eternally, she holds young elf Aladan in captivity. Chained to the wall and in intense agony, he’s forced to write on the wall that physically restrains him.

Despite his situation, he’s not writing angry prose. He’s writing love stories! You see, his illiterate and mute detainer is enthralled by legendary tales of the heart, and forces Aladan to write and orate them for her.

Why romance stories? Because it turns out this big beast has a big heart for a fellow ogre. Sadly, her love isn’t reciprocated, and so she uses Aladan’s storytelling as a way to temporarily escape her sadness.

But Aladan claims he can permanently grant her happiness. How? By penning a love letter to her heartthrob! And of course, if the ogre finds true love, Aladan will be surplus to her requirements and be a free elf. So they begin creating the ultimate confession of adoration, all while forming a closer bond to one another along the way…

Yet this newly found friendship is meaningless if Aladan cannot win over the ogre’s heartthrob and win his freedom. Will he succeed? Or is the pen not as mighty as proverbs say it is? Only by reading the letter in The Letter will you find out!

Pages: 11

Budget: Mid-range. Of course, the FX could be lengthy if one wanted to go that way. Or it could be CGI. Or simply… implied!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: A fun guy with a wicked sense of humor, Jesus Diez Perez wears many hats: VFX, writer and director (just to name a few). Contact him at jdiezperez “AT” gmail.com! In his own words: I’m a writer, producer, director, editor and visual effects artist with experience in big companies like Weta or Lucasfilm. I love telling the untold stories, those that lurk in the shadows while the famous ones get told and retold. And I’m always looking for a different angle, with a new edge. For a list of my credits, please view them at IMDB here: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3925667/

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

James Barron’s Narrator – Optioned! - posted by wonkavite

Okay folks – time to band together for a hearty congratulations to writer James Barron. His seriously satiric and stand-out comedy short, Narrator, has been officially optioned to Alexander D. Holland of Kemosabe Films.

And trust us – that’s just the beginning. James has far more work available – some of which has already aired on STS. And some of which is pending. Soon, my little precious, soon…

So before you miss the bandwagon, we recommend you grab one of these…

Avoidance — A socially anxious man goes to epic lengths to avoid having a conversation with an old acquaintance. STS Review here!

Grammar Nazi Killer — Three social media obsessed teenagers learn that grammatical errors and poor spelling can have deadly consequences.

Hair — A family man trying to keep his life from falling apart becomes obsessed with impending baldness.

Noob — A highly evolved, alien-made artificial intelligence system tries to teach a cantankerous 80-year old human how to work an iPhone.

Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse – Life after the zombie apocalypse is harsh and uncompromising. But for two stoners holed up in an apartment with a lifetime supply of weed, it’s more like an inconvenience. STS Review here!

Course Listing Unavailable – An ambitious student signs up for an internship program promising real world, hands-on experience. Who knew bloodthirsty demons would be involved? STS Review Here!

About the writer: James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail. We suggest you do so – quick!

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

The Elevator Most Belonging to Alice – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Dane Whipple

The Elevator Most Belonging to Alice
Short Finalist for the 2016 Nashville Film Festival!
Where will life take you?

“The Sole Property of Miss Alice” So reads the small plaque hanging in the large, luxurious elevator in which we open. We observe ten-year-old Alice, and her butler, Jerome. At first, Alice is unsure of just why she is here, or even where here is. But after a formal ribbon-cutting ceremony, Jerome tenderly explains the rules: this is Alice’s space, and this elevator will take her anywhere.

From here we are whisked away on a grand tour. Rather than falling with Alice down a rabbit hole, we fly high with her through the clouds and over snow-capped mountains. Alice is enthralled and delighted to be lifted up out of her seemingly dreary life. The spectacle outside is nearly as engaging as the conversation that Alice and Jerome are having inside the elevator. You see, as they soar through the sky, the two ruminate on Alice’s situation. It seems she is having some difficulty back home, and Jerome is here to help her through it all. He will stand by her side and help her take strength in her hour of need, which will come soon.

As the journey’s end draws near, Alice learns that you don’t always have to move to change where you are. The emotional hammer drops as we find out just what Alice has been flying away from, and what she still faces ahead. This is one ending that will stick with your audience long after the final frame.

The Elevator Most Belonging to Alice offers a surreal fantasy escape in the tradition of Lynch and Fellini. The script packs a potent, powerful punch, while delicately examining a difficult subject matter without ever devolving into exploitation. A metaphorical, metaphysical, meditation on life, akin to Radio Flyer, the message is one of courage, endurance, and above all, hope. All of which are themes that continually reap benefits on the awards circuit.

So hop on board before the doors close, this script will take you anywhere you want to go.

Pages: 17

Budget: Medium. One central location, the elevator, may need a production designer. Limited SFX.

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple is talking with Davey, who’s still in the Navy, and probably will be for life. He is currently working on that screenplay everybody keeps talking about: The Wild Age. Contact him at dane.whipple (at) live.com.

About the Writer: An award winning writer, Bill Sarre has had scripts place both finalist and quarter finalist with Page and Bluecat. Another short of his, The Grieving Spell, was recently grand prize winner of the London Film Awards. Bill can be reached at Bill.sarre “AT” gmail.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Ten Thousand Souls – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Ten Thousand Souls
In England’s darkest hour of the 1300’s, a Doctor makes a deal with Death Himself

What would you do if the Grim Reaper came a knockin’? If you’re Bill and Ted, you go on a Bogus Journey… Only a few of you will get that reference, but it’ll kill (pun intended) those of you that do.

What if, instead, you made a deal with the Reaper? IE: the Harbinger of Death? That is the very question asked in the script Ten Thousand Souls, penned by apt scribe Marnie Mitchell-Lister.

We meet Doctor Oliver Blackburn in 1900, visiting a gravely ill patient. Sadly, there doesn’t seem to be much that can be done. So Doctor Blackburn offers to sit with the man until his time comes – and he “goes”.

Sweet, right? Not so fast. Because soon as the man passes, Doctor Blackburn… well, let’s just say, “makes his move”..

Throughout Ten Thousand Souls, Doctor Blackburn narrates our story, keeping us hooked as we jump through centuries (from 1350 to 1970 to 2011). Twists and turns abound until our journey is brought to a satisfying – albeit tragic – end.

A script with multiple advantages, Ten Thousand has the potential to play well to the festival and awards crowd, but to help make a name for a director looking for their start.

Blue Oyster Cult once sang “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper”Ten Thousand Souls reminds us that maybe, just maybe, we should.

Pages: 6

Budget: Notable. There are several time jumps (from 1350 to 2011 and a few in between). It also has multiple settings. However, there are only a few characters (Doctor Blackburn and Death most prominently) which lessens the budget a smidge. There are, of course, some effects that will be necessary to bring this tale to life on screen. That said, a clever director with a set, access to some costumes and some loyal actors could likely make this work for less. Anyway, what are you doing reading this? Contact Marnie and get this thing made!

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the author – An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at http://brainfluffs.com/. Marnie’s had 5 shorts produced (so far) and placed Semi-final with her features in Bluecat.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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