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Wednesday, May 31, 2017

A Jolly Encounter – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Guest Reviewer

A Jolly Encounter by Jason K. Allen

Two young hikers encounter a mysterious backpacker with a candy cane phone and a penchant for milk and cookies.

            NICK
How long have you had those boots,
Ted? Looks like they’ve seen
better days.

            TED
Well, it’s been about… Wait, how
do you know my name?

For many people, hiking is a paradoxical hobby – a chance to rest, yet keep fit at the same time. Undisturbed trails provide a calm backdrop for exercise… combined with walks of the meditative kind.

As Jason K. Allen’s A Jolly Encounter opens, two young ramblers – Ted and Melanie – are doing just that.

But their quiet hike through the great outdoors is soon interrupted: by an enigmatic man who calls himself “Nick”.

Nick? He looks odd at first glance. Yes, he owns a candy cane phone. And he’s got a sweet tooth for gingerbread men – even though he’s trying to lose weight.

And Nick’s other traits are strange as well. Somehow, he knows both Ted and Melanie’s names, though they’ve never met him before. As the strangers settle down and chat, the duo form an educated guess as to who “Nick” is. Not surprisingly, they’re ardent fans!

From there, a more serious discussion develops: one that stands the cinematic test of time. What moral virtues should Ted and Melanie cultivate in themselves? What’s Nick’s work in relation to human nature? Or to Nature itself? And that’s the aim of all great films – candy coating universal themes in entertainment, helping the “medicine” go down. There’s even an unexpected twist at the end… one that will fill your audience with delight.

Like Pixar did with its classics, Jolly can be seen from many sides. A gentle story to amuse kids, with an adult message at its nougat core.

Are you a comic director who likes satire? Chuckles with morals on the side? Then choose Jolly for a read. It’s got mass appeal, sharp dialogue… and if you end up being the good little boy or girl who brings it to the screen, you may find some gifts (like festival awards) under your Christmas tree!

Budget: Pretty low. All you need is the great outdoors, some even greater actors. Oh – and a nice red suit.

About the writer: Jason K. Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, Tennessee. His screenwriting credits include the short films AMERICAN SOCK, which won Best Screenplay at the 2014 San Diego Film Awards, and AUTUMN LOVERS, winner of the Audience Award at the 2013 Artlightenment Festival in Nashville. He also wrote the feature film LUCKY FRITZ starring Julia Dietze (IRON SKY) and Corey Feldman. You can contact Jason at allen.jason.k (at) gmail. See IMDB for his complete credits.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on @HamishP95.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, May 5, 2017

Welcome to the Machine – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Guest Reviewer

Welcome to the Machine (6 pages in pdf format) by Dustin Bowcott

A Job Seeker looking to work for The Machine isn’t happy when she doesn’t get the job she wants.

“Absolute power corrupts absolutely.” – John Dalberg-Acton

Such is the theme of the great metaphorical script Welcome to the Machine, by talented writer Dustin Bowcott.

This grisly tale starts out with something we’ve all been through: a simple job interview.

A young woman named Angela waits nervously while Teufel, her potential boss, looks over her application. Lucky for her, she gets the job. Once Angela begins her job training, however, things take a… bizarre turn.

You see, in this world, a huge monster exists who must be fed to be appeased. And this monster is hungry… for human flesh. So Angela and Teufel head down to the cave and watch as hordes of people are herded into the creature’s mouth.

Images of Nazi Germany come to mind as Angela sees someone from her past, about to be fed to the monster’s cavernous maw. Will she be a hero and rescue the man from certain death? Or turn her back on humanity and embrace the beast?

The surprise comes when Angela finds out what job she’s really being offered. Spoiler alert: it’s not quite what she (or the reader) thinks.

Just know that the end highlights that age-old question: how far would YOU go to get ahead?

Budget: High, but still possible, and worth the bang for the buck. Lots of actors (though only three speaking parts) and some CGI or other effects for the monster. But a savvy director could probably make this for less, though there will still be some cost attached.

About the Writer: Dustin Bowcott is a self employed microbe retailer and father of four boys and a girl. He has enjoyed writing since the day he read his first novel. For Dustin, writing is something he has to do, when not writing, he’s thinking about writing and will absorb himself into multiple projects at one time. When he gets tired of writing one thing he moves onto another and has been known to work on three different stories in one day, writing for sometimes 12 hours straight and, on occasion, even longer. Dustin can turn his hand to any genre and has just finished first draft of a new children’s novel. Dustin is a BBC Writer’s Room finalist and a Shore Scripts finalist both in 2014. He is a produced and optioned writer, and has recently turned his hand to production, having produced his first short film with another in the pipeline that should be completed this year. Want to see what else he has in store? Give him a shout-out at dustin7375 “AT” gmail.

About the Reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, April 24, 2017

Jasper and Mimi Forever – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Guest Reviewer

Jasper and Mimi Forever(5 pages, pdf format) by Jason K. Allen

The curious tale of Jasper and Mimi, two wild n’ crazy outcasts in love

When it comes to love – true love – opposites attract. Both in real life and the movies, too. We’ve all drooled jealously over successful couples like Beauty and the Beast, Shrek and Fiona, King Kong and Fay Wray or… Howard the Duck and Beverly? Okay, so the last one was a little questionable. But you get the funky drift.

So now readers have Jasper and Mimi Forever… introduced to them at midnight as Jasper wakes from the grips of a fierce nightmare! You know, the kind of midnight sweats that steals away your urge to sleep. Jasper recalls the dream and describes it to his true love Mimi, who rests soundly at his side. With a soft assuring voice, Mimi informs him gently – dearest Jasper, that’s all true!

In the word’s of The Twilight Zone’s iconic Rod Serling, imagine if you will: a private conversation between two lovebirds – of a very peculiar kind. This story is heartwarming, funny and yes – odd. Especially when there’s a vegetable involved for a certain body part. And here’s a clue: that’s not Jasper’s nose!

But far from gratuitous, Jasper and Mimi Forever is pure unique. And bound to get the attention of many directors and producers (much like writer Jason Allen’s other quirky tales). So warning: don’t let this one pass through your fingers. Or you’ll be having nightmares that will drench you in your sleep!

Budget: Low. One location, some Halloween props and – a carrot. A big carrot. Hopefully. If you’re feeling generous and cocky, that is.

About the Writer: Jason K. Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, Tennessee. His screenwriting credits include the short films AMERICAN SOCK, which won Best Screenplay at the 2014 San Diego Film Awards, and AUTUMN LOVERS, winner of the Audience Award at the 2013 Artlightenment Festival in Nashville. He also wrote the feature film LUCKY FRITZ starring Julia Dietze (IRON SKY) and Corey Feldman. You can contact Jason at allen.jason.k (at) gmail. IMDB Credits

About the Reviewer: Debra Johnson is an award winning screenwriter. She currently has two shorts in pre-production, which were found on STS. For more information on Debra, visit her website at www.gatolocofilms.com

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Careful What You Wish For – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Zach Zupke

Careful What You Wish For (1 page in pdf format) by Tim Westland

Magic genies and bottles. Such things never end well. Or DO they?

We all know someone who rubs us the wrong way. A friend of a friend. A relative. Or, in some tragic cases… one’s own spouse. Things can get real ugly when two people don’t see eye to eye – especially when divorce looms on the horizon. When that’s the case – it’s no holds barred. War of the Roses. One up-manship – at any cost.

Fortunately, Karma has a way of exacting sweet revenge on those who test its limits. The only trouble with karma is; you never know when it’ll rear its head. But it does – it’s magical.

Which is the case with Tim Westland’s one-pager “Wish.” The script starts with brothers Steve and Bill walking the surf on a sunny Southern California beach. Normally – a pretty enjoyable experience, except for Bill’s sad state of affairs. As they walk, he tells his sibling of his woes: Bill’s wife is divorcing him for half of everything. Plus alimony. And she’s been cheating on him from day one. If ever there was a need to “insert karma here,” this here’s the perfect time.

Bill stubs his toe on something and yelps. What’s this? Bad fortune? Reverse karma?! Nope, it’s the tip of a lamp jutting from the sand. And Bill quickly discovers why it’s been placed in his path.

“I am yours to command,” intones a Genie after Bill gives the lamp a vigorous rub. “You have but one wish, and whatever you receive, your wife will receive twice over.”

Brother Steve advises caution. “Careful, these Genies are a tricky lot.”

Bill doesn’t hesitate. He knows exactly what to wish for. Riches? Perfect health? Unbelievable happiness? But if he gets those – his soon-to-be ex gets double.

So he takes a breath and wishes for… Well, read the script and find out!

Short and sweet, Careful What You Wish For is a great take on an old classic. Perfect for an indie director with imagination – and a humoristic one-two punch!

Budget: Pretty reasonable. A small amount of FX and costumes required.

About the Writer: Tim Westland is an award winning writer whose many scripts have consistently place in the Semi/Quarter finals in Page, Bluecat, and Screencraft. His screenplay, OBeast, co-authored with frequent writing partner Rod Thompson, finished in the Top 10 of ScreenCraft’s 2017 Horror contest. OBeast is also a 2017 iHorror.com finalist. Tim is also the co-author of the acclaimed horror comic/graphic novel (and screenplay), Chasing the Dead, published by IDW.

About the Reviewer: An LA based writer, Zach Zupke can be contacted via email at zzupke “AT” yahoo

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Fabric – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

Fabric (16pages in pdf format) by Anthony Cawood

“A newly hired accountant searches through a village balance sheet to weed out inefficiencies. But is cutting corners always wise?”

Anticipation; it’s an experience vital for any script reader. Not to mention film audiences everywhere. Want to experience that tingly, edge-of-your-seat sensation?

Then crack open a script. And stop. Page One.

There it is. Can you feel it?

Before reading a single paragraph – anticipation’s the emotion you crave. That foreboding sense of things to come; the ebb and flow of narrative.

Now, imagine sitting in the theater. The lights dim; your dreams and hopes soon to appear. I hope this movie’s really good. You focus attention on the screen. And before you know it, the story grabs you by your very soul. Anticipation rules the day. Your sense of wonder; riveted. What’s going to happen next? That’s the best question of them all. What a captivating feeling!

The undercurrent of Anthony Cawood’s script Fabric, Anticipation is a gift to any script reader. One that keeps on giving.

The hero of our story: Jeremy Saunders – a newbie 20-something accountant, hired by a tiny village to audit its stumbling finances. When we first meet him, nebbish Jeremy’s hard at work at his PC – scrutinizing questionable payroll activity. The suspicious sum: “twenty thousand pounds a year” – an exorbitant amount being paid to some local man named Pater. And Pater’s “services” are suspect: winding the one and only church clock in town. One single time. Every day.

Though he presents his findings, Jeremy finds his concerns rebuffed by superiors: Pater provides an “essential service”, Old Man Gutherie claims. That of ‘clock winder’? How can this be? Unsatisfied by Gutherie’s dismissal, Jeremy’s bean-counter mind rebels. So he strikes off to tour the village, interviewing reluctant town folk everywhere. His mission: to uncover the suspected scam – in search of ‘truth’ and ‘clarity’.

As they say – game on.

As the day winds towards a close, Jeremy’s quest for Pater widens. Eventually, he tracks the elusive man down – meeting Pater at his very door.

And so, the mystery is laid bare. Who truly is Pater? Does he exist? And what do his “services” actually mean? A delicious underdog fantasy, Fabric weaves anticipation into a lyrical tale. One filled with wonder, and a pevertedly satisfying moral twist: “Be careful what you wish for. Pursue one’s questions, if you dare…”

Are you a director with imagination? Then give fairy-tale Fabric a whirl. Anticipation is a beautiful ingredient. One that will fill your audience’s hearts. Not to mention, the silver screen.

Budget: A small challenge, due to the rural setting. You’ll need some creativity to pull this one off, but the story is so worth it. 😀

About the writer: Anthony is an award winning screenwriter from the UK with 2 features optioned and over 30 short scripts optioned, or purchased, including 8 filmed. Outside of his screenwriting career, he’s a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to his films and details of his scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working on a historical feature.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Like a Moth to a Flame – Sold - posted by Pete Barry

Sold

It will be produced and directed by Jeff Easley. Production will begin in early March.

Jeff recently directed John Hunter’s “Writer’s Block” and “The Coffee Maker from Hell” written by Greg Thomson.

Jeff’s IMDb and Vimeo pages.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Like a Moth to a Flame (11 pages, pdf format) by Matias Caruso

A woman attempts to exorcise her lost lover. But is his pull too powerful to wish away?

Love, they say, is a flame. Passionate. Unstoppable. Consuming everything in its wake. That type of love can drive one to irrational, insane acts. Commit unspeakable crimes in its name.

Nadia’s flame is Jack.

Her love for Jack blots out all else. Reason. Proportion. Even reality.

Alone in her dark apartment, Nadia obsesses over the lost love of her life. Though the holes in her memory blot out certain things, other visions refuse to go away. The miserable existence she’s led since he’s been gone. The drastic measures she’s taken to kill the pain. Shopping. Eating. Cutting her arms with razors.

At her wit’s end, Nadia finally summons “Mr. K.” – a mysterious shaman wearing rings made of bone, a man she believes can make the pain go away.

Is it a hallucination? Or black magic? And does that even matter, if the pain itself is real? But can Mr. K. do anything to end Nadia’s suffering; save her from the misery?

A terrifying psychological fantasy ripped from the imagination of master writer Matias Caruso, Like a Moth to the Flame explores multiple dark themes: rationalization, addiction. The void left behind when one’s cut off from the object of their desire.

It’s a low budget masterpiece with frightening visuals. Give Moth a read – it’ll suck you in, and burn your wings.

Budget: Low budget – a cast of two, in a single apartment – lit by the static of a television set. And leave room for a great costumer designer. Mr. K deserves some fashionable threads!

About the writer: An optioned and award winning screenwriter, Matias Caruso has far too many accolades to name. So we’ll stick with just one: he’s the 2014 Grand Prize Winner of the International Page Awards Contest. Not to mention an all-around terrific guy. Interested in Matias’ work? Email him at matiascaruso32 (a) gmail

About the reviewer: Pete Barry is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright, actor, director and musician. His short plays have been published in numerous collections. He’s also a cofounder of the Porch Room, a film and theater production company, website available at http://www.porchroom.com/.  Please feel free to reach out to him with script requests at petebarry27 (a) Hotmail.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, December 29, 2016

Alba – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by The Merrows

Alba (5 pages in pdf foramt) by Robert G. Newcomer

Art…or abomination?

Alba, a short little screenplay, is a touching story of Science. Art. And a touch of magic.

On top of that, it’s mostly true…

Alba is a glowing bunny. Literally. Alba’s DNA has been spliced with phosphorescent jellyfish – giving her a greenish glow. (Especially when bathed in black light.) A case of science gone mad, you say? More like an art experiment – assisted by genetist “Ivan”. Unveiled to the world by artist “Dimitri” at the turn of the 21st century, Alba’s green glow was broadcast everywhere.

Needless say, not all were pleased. Angry demonstrations ensued, protesting the reduction of the “genome to a playground.” During the ensuring maelstrom of press, Ivan was almost fired. And Alba’s exhibit was cancelled – the bunny removed from her emerald spotlight.

As time passed, the headlines died away. Eventually Alba passed, as well. Over time, memory of the experiment faded – remembered only by a select few. Ivan. And his young daughter, Meghan. Too young to contemplate the greater issues, Meghan experienced Alba through innocent eyes – as the gentle (and glowing) creature she was.

Now grown, Meghan now tells the tale to her daughter, 7 year old Kelly. Giving it her own whimsical spin, Meghan tells Kelly of the sweet bunny… misunderstood by the entire world. Fortunately, there’s a secret grandpa’s been keeping. And a happy ending to Alba’s “tail”…

The truth is often stranger than fiction. In an industry where “dark and twisted” rules supreme, Alba is a stand out short. A touch of SF and fantasy – mixed with a huge helping of whimsy. A director can never go wrong with that!!

Budget: Low – medium. A few actors, minimal settings. Some glowing-bunny FX required!

About the writer: Robert Newcomer recently received his first IMDB credit for another short, Them That’s Dead. An intelligent writer, he has several other shorts and a horror feature length available for consideration. Bert’s IMDB credits are listed here.

About the reviewers: Scott & Paula Merrow are a husband and wife screenwriting team. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy – the whole nine yards. They’re reachable at scott-paula (a) comcast.net.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, December 23, 2016

The Gifted Photographer – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by LC

The Gifted Photographer (pdf format) Ian J. Courter

A photographer pays a house-call to shoot a family portrait where his true talent becomes apparent.

Photographs, those treasured mementos of our lives – they can chart a life from birth through to adulthood, and beyond. We keep photos in our wallets, in lockets around our necks, in photo-frames by our bedside tables. Photographs allow us to freeze moments – to travel back in time.

The Gifted Photographer is set towards the end of the Victorian era. At first glance it conjures Great Britain, but America had its own Gilded Age, most notably in the regions of New England and the Deep South. Think Gothic Architecture, the Women’s Suffragette Movement, Republican domination, and literary greats such as Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain. This was also a period characterized by high society and strict morality.

Ian J. Courter manages beautifully to evoke the images of the time – the cobblestone streets, horse drawn carriages and top-hats.

Photography at this time was in its infancy – there was no such thing as the ‘Selfie’ and no such thing as Instagram or Snapchat. The taking of photographs, in particular portraits, was only ever done for special occasions.

The story opens on Michael Houtman, the titular photographer of the piece. Herbert and Margaret Jaffe have requested his services for a very special family portrait with their daughter, Linda. Michael strikes up a conversation with Linda and discovers this sweet young woman suffered a nasty spill on the ice a few months ago. The accident has left her sickly and confined to a wheelchair, but this morning she wakes to a perfect Spring day feeling better than she has in a long time – and she’s ready for her close-up.

But this is no ordinary day, no ordinary photo-shoot, and no ordinary photographer…

Far be it for me to shed too much light, or bring into focus the darker themes and rich cultural history explored in The Gifted Photographer, suffice to say the Latin phrases Ars moriendi and Memento mori both give clues into a not so well known practice explored in this unique tale.

Of course, all you have to do to find out more is read the script. You’ll not only discover the secret talent The Gifted Photographer possesses, but will also uncover the talent of writer Ian J. Courter.  

With an ending that will stay with you long after the lights come up (we recommend reading it at night) and a final sting in the tail you won’t see coming, we advise you to get The Gifted Photographer in the can quick as a flash, before somebody else snaps it up.

Pages: 8

Budget: A little will be needed to make this one period.  But given what you get in the return, it’s definitely worth it!

About the writer: Ian J. Courter has an academic and technical-writing background, and is published in both fields, so a shift to another form of writing seemed natural. He strives to combine his writing skills with nearly two decades of military experience to develop screenplays with vivid locations and in-depth, realistic characters. What started as a hobby quickly became a passion.  In only a few short years, he has written three feature-length screenplays and nine short scripts.  He currently has several feature-length scripts in various stages of development and continually seeks inspiration for more. His email address is ian.j.courter “at” gmail.com.

About the reviewer: L. Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, October 24, 2016

Allured – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Rustom Irani

Allured (pdf format) by Pii (Π) Anttonen

An eerie castle, dribbling candles, a lost officer and a bunch of ghosts. You know… the usual stuff.

“What is a ghost? A tragedy condemned to repeat itself time and again?” – From Guillermo Del Torro’s “El Espinazo Del Diablo”

There’s something truly tragic about Ghosts. More than zombies, monsters and human serial kllers, ghosts feed on a viewer’s empathy. Phantasms that were once human… now condemned to suffer in eternity. When faced with a creature such as this, how can one not feel sympathy?

Especially with classic ghost tales, like Allured. Set in an Austrian castle, the script opens as Sergeant Franz stumbles to the door, battle beaten and weary. Although Franz is a stranger to the household, old servant Frederich lets him in – offering shelter from the war. The caretaker leads Franz towards an upstairs bedroom. He’s watching it for his master’s return, he tells his guest. They’re the sole inhabitants of the castle: Franz is sure to get some uninterrupted sleep.

Or will he?

Shortly after turning in for the night, Franz encounters a strange woman in his bed.* When he attempts to wake her, his hand goes through her body! He races to Frederich’s quarters to inform him of the intruder. But Frederich insists it was a dream – and implores the sergeant to go back to sleep. Needless to say, sleep proves to be… elusive. When Franz returns to his room, the woman is gone. But children’s footsteps echo in the hall. And then there are the sounds downstairs. Almost like a – party? Franz heads for the dining room to confront his fears, unsure what he’ll find…

Though once a staple of the horror genre, ghost stories have become a rare breed. Stylishly written with a touch of humor, Allured harkens back to a classier time in movies. When films were shot in black and white… and curtains blowing in the breeze brought a tingle to one’s spine. Perhaps that time has come again: in a cinematic world filled with slasher and torture porn shorts, Allured would be sure to stand out in festivals!

* Sleeping. That’s it! This is a classic ghost tale, folks – get your minds out of the gutter!

Pages: 8

Budget: Not quite as impossible as it seems. While the castle location, costumes and extras may seem daunting for production purposes, there are plenty of possible “cheats.” If skillfully applied, stock footage, generic “stone wall” spaces and just a touch of camera tricks could be all the set you need!

About the writer: Pii Anttonen (first name pronounced like Π, not like the bathroom activity) was previously known by some other name and while being being busy with that, edited the Voice Over online scriptwriting magazine, worked on several virtual shows, won a Simply Scripts One Week Challenge once and had some shorts produced. These days her writing duties consist mainly of writing on commission for production companies and groups, knowing full well that it’s unlikely that anything will see the light of day, but accepts that that kind of is what the scriptwriting job is. She can be reached at pii.anttonen (a) gmail.com!

About the reviewer: A film and video aficionado based in Mumbai, Rustom Irani works as a freelance editor and screenwriter for projects ranging from narratives, commercials, and documentaries to corporate and music videos. His website is available at PlanetRusty.com, and he can be reached at rustyirani “AT” gmail.com!

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

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    Meeting The Other Woman by David Lambertson (eldave1) writing as Anonymous

    A wife discovers something important about her own life when she finally meets the other woman. 12 pages
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