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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Ready or Not – Filmed - posted by Ingrid Short

Ready or Not (pdf format) by Steven Clark

A simple game of hide-n-seek takes a turn for the worst.

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The Original Review

Mom and her son play a fun game of hide-and-go-seek. But, what if what you find is not what you were looking for?

This micro short can be as scary as you want to be. Snap this up now.

It’s a perfect weekend shoot and an excellent calling card short film that, as written, can be a family friendly horror comedy or an very un-family-friendly horror.

Pages: 2

Budget: Shoestring budget, two actors – Mom and son, one interior location.

About the writer: Based in upstate, NY, Steven Clark is the writer of over 30 short scripts, several of which are under option, in pre-production, or have already been made into films. On A Clear Night, a family Christmas feature aimed at a Hallmark Channel-type audience, is currently in the works. Steven can be reached at Steamroller138 (a) gmail.

About the reviewer: < crickets >

Read Read or Not (pdf format)

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This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, May 2, 2016

A Child Outside – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Guest Reviewer

Warning: Strong and Disturbing Content

A Child Outside
Motherly love can be shown in oh so many ways… even murder.

We don’t like to hear about a young person being hurt, much less witness it. How could a parent ever intentionally harm their own child? Or… kill them? What could possibly possess a parent to perpetrate such a deed?

It’s not easy to portray the unpinning of fundamental societal assumptions, especially when they have to do with family, loyalties or a mother’s unconditional love. Yet, Chris Keaton masterfully does just that in his latest work, A Child Outside.

The main character, Anna, is convinced that mommy knows best, that death is the only option. It’s for their own good. It’s what God would want. And, Anna’s faith is unwavering.

ANNA
I’m sorry sweet baby I should’ve-

She chokes back tears.

ANNA
I should’ve paid attention to the signs…

She whispers a prayer to herself.

ANNA
Fear not, for I have redeemed you. When you pass through the waters, I will be with you. When you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you…

Anna appears to be crazy; her daughters so young and innocent.

Short but not at all sweet, Keaton’s very dark A Child Outside comes to a twisted and chilling end: one that will be sure to unsettle any audience’s assumptions about Satan or sanity.

Number of pages: 4

Budget: Low. Just a bathtub, a couch, a television set, two Sunday best girls’ dresses and two child actresses.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing. She may be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: Chris Keaton is an Air Force veteran living with his family in sunny Arizona. He’s primarily a screenwriter, but he does love diving into prose. He has had several short screenplays produced and go on to win awards. He’s optioned a few features screenplays and currently has a thriller feature in pre-production. A young-adult novel based on one of his screenplays is soon to be released. You can see some of his projects on his website, (www.Chris-Keaton.com) or follow him on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Chris-Keaton/456096811068609).

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Father’s Day – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by Dane Whipple

Father’s Day
There’s no such thing as a bad day out with your kid…

What are doing reading this? The screenplay is two pages long, give it whirl!

Still reading? Alright, alright, here’s a quick primer:

A father and son spend quality time on the lake – fishing throughout the day. The fish may not be biting, but the two soon discover that the key to a successful Father’s Day may be just a matter of perspective, after all.

Written by veteran scribe Dave Troop, Father’s Day is the best gift a Dad (or a director) can receive: a quick set-up that delivers a heartfelt, heartwarming, and absolutely unforgettable finale.

If you were reading the script, you’d be halfway through by now. Well, your loss. Seriously…

Simple concepts – well-written and well-executed – are a rare find in the short-film world. Like Celluloid Chicken Soup for the SoulFather’s Day is a recipe pre-simmered and fully packaged to inspire.

This is the kind of script that audience awards were made for: a tender testament to the bond between father and son – and a commentary about the legacies we leave our children.

So if you’re a director looking for soulful, cinematic meditation destined to put a joyous tear in many an eye – this one’s a perfect catch. Don’t let it swim away!

Pages: 2

Budget: Low. Three actors, two locations, and one great excuse to take a boat out on the lake.

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple is quick with a joke or to light-up your smoke. Contact him at dane.whipple (AT) live.com

About the Writer:  David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Ribbeck Von Ribbeck – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by Guest Reviewer

Ribbeck Von Ribbeck
A rhyming, lyrical fable about an aging squire who teaches us how to cultivate a legacy: by passing-on the things most important to us.

Germany. A country that has a fascinating, yet bitterly haunting history. The literary past of the country does not stray from this statement: from the cautionary fairy tales of the Grimm brothers to the vindictive characters omnipresent in Sturm and Drang stories, it appears that the prominent German novels, short stories, and even films all have a very sinister coating around the meat of the story.

Which is why you’ll be cheered up by Dane Whipple’s adaptation of Herr von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck im Havelland, a 19th century traditional Teutonic Poem with a brighter touch, although still jam-packed with meaning. So much of it, in fact, that the poem is still taught in German schools today.

The poem is about a simple concept: Ribbeck is an old, well respected man who owns a pear tree, and he interacts with the young children of his village, Havelland by generously donating the offspring of his pride and joy. But when he passes away, the connection between the succulent pears and the appreciative children appears to have been severed…or has it?

Thankfully, Whipple has truncated the lengthy title to just “Ribbeck von Ribbeck”, and while the screenplay itself may seem similarly austere at just 4 pages, the expertly crafted interlocking of narration of the poem verbatim (don’t worry, it’s been translated to English) and action means you get a lot of plot for your page; every line adds new understanding to the story, as it should always be.

Despite the deceptively straightforward story, choosing to take on the task of directing this European classic will be a challenge, albeit an enjoyable one. A narrator with (or who can put on) a suitably powerful, yet tender German voice (and no, Arnie is Austrian) would be the icing on the cake. Actually, it’d be the fruit on the branches.

A faithful yet unique adaptation of a German classic, this short and delicate script is a must have for anyone looking to add some international flavour to their filmography. Capture the spirit of Ribbeck, and your film will stand out at festivals – far and wide!

And of course, there’s one question that needs to be answered: Does the dying man have one final trick up his sleeve to ensure fruity prosperity continues after he’s gone or will it all go pear-shaped for the kids of Havelland?

Pages: 4

Budget: A tranquil and beautiful location is best for this one. But is that a bank buster? In no way. Just a matter of cinematic taste.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Dane Whipple is a highly-successful legal drafter, currently working as a senior construction defects attorney for a billion-dollar skyscraper and concert hall in Hamburg, Germany. As an award-winning author, he has written and produced several shorts, done punch-up work for various television projects, and is in the process of finishing his first feature: The Wild Age. A culmination of a full year of primary document research, the script is a music bio-pic with a kick. Think Ed Wood meets Eraserhead…with music. Dane is open to criticism (positive and negative) and collaboration. Contact him at dane.whipple (AT) live.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Snow Day – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Snow Day

A grumpy old man spends a snowy day with his granddaughter.

In these jaded times, it’s easy to forget how lovable movies can be. Remember the first time you saw It’s a Wonderful Life? Christmas Story? Mary Poppins or Chitty Chitty Bang Bang? Even if you’re a movie buff who mainlines Quentin Tarantino for breakfast, there’s something to be said for taking a break… and catching a heartwarming flick every once in awhile.

Snow Day is one of those stories. Cantankerous old Frank, 60s, isn’t the most pleasant person to spend time with… especially if you’re related to him. Unfortunately for his granddaughter Roxanne, Frank’s been charged with babysitting her for the day. Neither one’s looking forward to the experience. Barricaded inside the house on a winter’s day, the two resign themselves to an afternoon of crayons. But as snow comes down, the two bond. And Frank’s heart begins to thaw…

An intelligent little script with great dialogue, Snow Day is sweet and lovable. Sometimes, that’s exactly what we need.

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie. He can be reached at dtroop506 “AT” gmail.com.

Pages: 8

Budget: Some snow and a house. It doesn’t get easier (or more nostalgic) than this!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, August 1, 2014

Taking the Reins – Feature Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop Features

Taking the Reins

A reckless equestrian struggles through personal and professional setbacks to try to make history as the youngest winner of the elite Rolex championship, but his destructive personality poses the biggest obstacle to claiming the title.

Horse fanciers. They’re an extremely enthusiastic group. For those who love horses, the fascination colors much of their world. Which isn’t surprising. Horses are powerful and elegant, not to mention an integral aspect of human development for centuries.

Throughout the history of cinema, a number of classic movies have been made about these majestic creatures. National Velvet. Sea Biscuit. The Black Stallion. Black Beauty. Flicka. Even animated movies such as Spirit:  Stallion of the Cimarron have made it to the silver screen.

Often focused on the strong, symbiotic bond developed between horse and owner, many of these films have revolved around the Old West. Or that familiar horse related sport – racing.

But there’s more far more to horses than just the Kentucky Derby. Covering such exotic challenges as dressage and jumps, equestrian eventing may be lesser known than horse racing. But it’s equally competitive; with quite the passionate fanbase. Given that, it’s surprising so few films have focused on this aspect of horse related sports. Only Sylvester and International Velvet touched on eventing.

But that’s where Taking the Reins comes in….

As the script opens, we meet 25 year old Will Ranck and his horse, Hemingway. Though relatively new to eventing, Will and Hemingway show great promise. Except for a few minor problems. First and foremost, Will’s dead broke. Then there’s the issue of his mother – a skilled eventer in her own right, she died two years ago at the hands of a drunk driver (his employer’s spoiled son, Terrance). Will’s taken to the bottle and bar fights since then, reducing his chance at success even more. Things go from bad to worse when Will’s fired from his job, and his father moves away… leaving Will to succeed or fail on his own.

Through a combination of fast-talk and dumb luck, Will secures a gig at Cross Meadows Farm, training with expert eventer Katheryn Brooks. Needless to say, things don’t go smoothly. Many of the riders on Katheryn’s team view Will as an unworthy interloper – making social integration less than easy. But despite the hurdles*, Will pushes ahead. Cutting a deal with the devil – his ex-boss – Will earns a slot in the Jersey Fresh competition. And his relationship with Cari, one of Katheryn’s riders, is just starting to heat up.

Then he qualifies for the ultimate competion – the Olympics of Eventing, Rolex. Things seem to be finally going Will’s way. At least, until Terrance pulls the sponsorship from under him, leaving Rolex and glory out of reach. Can Will overcome his obstacles and grasp the brass ring…. Or will he and Hemingway be left in the dust?

Custom-made for the festival circuit, Taking the Reins is unique. Set in a cinematic world that hasn’t been done-to-death, Reins is a classic “underdog” story: complete with romance and horses.

Several prominent people within the equestrian community have already expressed an interest in seeing a film like this get made. Matched to the right production company, this is a script with a ready-made fan base. What more could an indie director ask for? Option and purchase rights are, of course, available.  🙂

* Readers of STS: please forgive the pun

About the writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

Rick’s first feature Alienate just released a new terrific trailer – available for viewing here: http://www.alienatemovie.com/.

Pages: 111

Budget: Medium.  Needless to say, a director would need access to horses and an eventing competition field.  But other than that, there are no exotic locations that would put a script like this out of budgetary reach.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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