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Monday, December 28, 2015

Congratulations to Breanne Mattson – Bruce Dern to Star in Warning Shot – and Great News for A Day With Death as Well - posted by wonkavite

Mucho Congratulations to Breanne Mattson!

Reviewed on STS back in March 2014 , her script A Day With Death was subsequently discovered by Asurf Oluseyi and Asurf Films, Ltd. The film was shot in Lagos, Nigeria – bringing terrific cultural flavor to an already charming script.

As of today’s writing, Day has been officially nominated for Best Short Film for the Africa Magic Viewers Choice Awards!  (AMVC).  Not bad at all – fully deserved! For yet more information, the film’s Facebook page is available here:  https://www.facebook.com/adaywithdeath

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Oh – and then there’s Breanne’s OTHER amazing news…  Her feature length thriller Warning Shot has now officially cast Hollywood fav Bruce Dern in a pivotal role.  Here’s what the press has to say: The character-driven drama/thriller Warning Shot starts filming in Los Angeles in early 2016 with Bruce Dern heading its cast. The project was brought to Dern by veteran Casting Director John Jackson, known for his work on the award winning films The Descendants and Nebraska. Dern, who was nominated for an Academy Award for his performance in the film Nebraska, can also be seen this December in Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful EightIn Warning Shot, Dern will play a dying businessman whose legacy is in jeopardy.

The story centers on a single mother and her young daughter struggling to make ends meet until they inherit a farmhouse. When a family business rival sends armed men to take the water rights to the farm’s creek by force, the situation spirals out of control.

Written by Breanne Mattson, the script was a Nicholl quarterfinalist in 2011. Dustin Fairbanks will make his feature debut as director with Ross Otterman (Gutshot StraightExcision) producing. Executive Producing is DJ Dodd, whose film 10,000 Saints premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival.

But WAIT – THERE’S MORE!  (Oh so much, much more…) Directors in search of their next big thing should be aware that Breanne’s got more shorts available. Reposted for your consideration, please find The End in Sight – a gritty crime thriller by Ms. Mattson that’s just aching for the right producer to see it, er, visualized…

The End in Sight

A hired killer tries to finish one last job before going blind.

A bad guy with a soft spot – looking to do something right after a lifetime of mistakes…  What the heck is it about characters like this that captures the imagination?  Because they do. Every time.  They’re just so… more interesting than vanilla good guys. Hit men especially.  Watch the Professional or In Bruges, and dare to disagree.

The End in Sight is a short script that “hits” that exact note perfectly.  Enter Hugo – the consummate hit man.  He’s killed efficiently all his life. Now – unfortunately – he’s going blind.  Which, one could imagine, is really bad ju-ju for a man who relies on visual acuity…

Hugo’s trying to finish one last job before he retires: kill a gangster, and return a wayward prostitute, Winter, to a rival pimp named Skarda.  Needless to say – things get emotionally complicated and go horribly wrong.  Given the setup, this could have been a cliche script.  But The End in Sight does things right; pulling out twists and character beats that make the whole trip worthwhile. So if crime and thrillers are your forte, crack this one open. It’s got a killer ending…

About the writer: Breanne Mattson is no stranger to accolades.  Her feature lengths have made Nicholl Quarterfinalist three times (yeah, that’s three times, beeyotch!) She’s also made semi-finalist in BluecatFinal Draft and honorable mention in TrackingB.  She’s also received a “worth the read” from Scriptshadow.  Her website can be viewed at www.breannemattson.com (IMDB credits here.)

Pages: 35

Budget: Okay. This one’s no “newbie” script.  Thirty five pages long, it features plenty o’ squibs and bullet hits,  stunt car driving, and both inside and outside locations.  But in experienced hands, this script could be amazing.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, December 24, 2015

Les Garcons – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Gary Rowlands

LES GARCONS

A notorious French thief breaks into a museum and gets an unexpected surprise.

Crime capers. We love them so! Nothing captures a viewer’s imagination more than a priceless artifact, ferreted away by a daring cat burglar. Hollywood feeds our fancy with this genre regularly, treating us with star-studded movies such as The Oceans Eleven series, To Catch a Thief, The Score, Entrapment and of course The Thomas Crown Affair – an art theft film so popular they made it twice!

What do each of these entertaining films have in common (besides the pilfering of objets d’art?) A charismatic anti-hero who relies on style and stealth over violence.

Talented writer Jean-Pierre Chapoteau continues this grand tradition in Les Garcons. His worthy protagonist? The masterful and dashing “Jean-Luc The Great.”

As debonair as they come, our suave “master of all thieves” is blessed with great cunning and flamboyant skill. His daring criminal exploits include pilfering jewels right off the Pope, and “lifting zee necklace off of zee Queen of Spain as she dined in a room of one-hundred friends.” Not bad for a career cad’s resume.

His current target? The valuable painting “The Tree and the Fly”, displayed at a local museum. Unfortunately for this Master of Shadows, his best laid plans quickly go awry.

Jean’s caught red-handed by Tye – a young star-struck security guard. Tye triggers the alarm… then asks if he can have his picture taken with the criminal mastermind.

Have his picture taken? Never! Jean-Luc denies his ardent fan’s request. In a cunning game of cat and mouse, he demands to be taken to the “closest room of rest.” Guided into the break-room, an increasingly concerned Jean-Luc bargains with his captor. Let him go free… and perhaps a picture’s not out of the question.

Footsteps approach. All seems lost. But a clever twist proves the old saying: “never, ever trust a thief!”

About the writer: Jean-Pierre Chapoteau started writing feature length scripts in 2005 then focused on shorts in 2009. Since then he’s had three scripts produced and two more optioned. He has won several awards for his shorts and has become a moderator at the site MoviePoet, who specialize in the craft of the short scripts.  Jean-Pierre was a finalist in the RAW TALENT Competition for his faith based feature length script: ‘Far From Perfect.’ And was also a semi-finalist in the SLAMDANCE teleplay competition and a finalist in the OBSWRITER teleplay contest for his adapted teleplay, Curb Your Enthusiasm: The Guardian.  You can contact Jean-Pierre Chapoteau at:  Jeanpierre_4_25 “AT” msn(dot) com

Pages: 6

Budget: Low. Two actors. A few cheap props. A school hall or all purpose room dressed to look like a museum.

About the reviewer: Gary “Rolo” Rowlands cut his teeth on sketch comedy and was a commissioned writer on Spitting Image, a hugely popular sketch show in the UK that regularly attracted audiences of 8-10 million a week. He has several features available and is currently rewriting his contained supernatural thriller Offline. He can be contacted at gazrow at hotmail dot com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Friday, October 2, 2015

Stone Cold Sober – Optioned! (The Legend of CJ Walley Begins) - posted by wonkavite

Yep, CJ Walley does it again!  STS‘s answer to Quentin Tarantino, with a uniquely feminist Bonnie and Clyde spin, we’re happy to announce that CJ’s just optioned his pensive SF short Stone Cold Sober to director to Joshua Kimbrough (Las Vegas Film Collective).  Fortunately, there’s more where that came from – so give these three unique crime-drama offerings a shot:

Dixie Gash Bandits – When they stop to fix their get-a-way vehicle, two runaway sisters must tackle both love at first sight and the bounty hunters hot on their tail.

Lone Star Runner Hunnies – Fleeing a drug deal gone wrong, four girls held up in a lonely Texas diner face the dilemma of capture vs saving a mortally wounded friend.

Crazy Kitty (review pending) – A group of teens receive a visit from an “old friend”.  But reunions are not always happy things…

About the writer, C.J. WalleyI began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write new specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producers, directors, and actors in LA, NYC, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington DC, Zurich, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Dallas while occasionally blogging for Stage 32.  If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com

Monday, July 13, 2015

Evicted – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by LC

EVICTED

Two drug addled squatters receive an offer they can’t refuse.

Sexy Beast, Filth, Lock Stock:

Just a few select films from the small island across the pond in the crime and thriller genres. Each has made an indelible impression upon audiences worldwide.

British writers and filmmakers are masters at depicting their own special brand of crime. In his article for The Guardian earlier this year, Andrew Pulver examined the never ending popularity with audiences of Gangsters, geezers and guns and the booming low-budget crime-flick industry… both on the large and small screen.

Continuing with this tradition, and in his own inimitable fashion, STS is proud to showcase Dustin Bowcott’s short screenplay: Evicted.

We’re introduced to Steve and Baz, two down on their luck twenty-something lads who just happen to believe in that old adage: possession is nine-tenths of the law. If you’re wearing it, driving it, living in it, it’s yours – until proven otherwise. After all, home is where the heart is and when we first meet these two they are enjoying a nice quiet night in  – sitting back and relaxing amidst a little candlelight. Okay, that ambience is perhaps a little deceptive. There is candlelight but that’s because the power’s been cut off long ago. There’s also rats, broken glass and the general putridness and squalor associated with a ‘squat’.

What are these two up to? Well, they’re just about to partake in their first hit of heroin for the night – shared needle and all.  Just about to, when…

Will you look at what the wind just blew in – an unannounced visitor by the name of Gianni. In his forties, and in a whole other league to the boys. He’s well spoken, wearing high-end clobber – exquisite Italian leather shoes, tan crombie and black fedora with tan hatband. This is a man in charge.

So, what’s this hotshot want with two no-hopers?

Gianni’s got a few problems – or as he likes to put it, a few ‘most hated things’ that need fixin’. Which is where the lads come in. Contrary to what we first fear Gianni is not concerned with how this lot came to be here, nor what vices they may indulge in.  He’d rather take advantage of their less than altruistic attributes, in the form of a very tempting proposition.

Steve, being the brains of the outfit, (and I use that term loosely) is at first a little circumspect, despite his drug-induced haze. But when Gianni drops a bag of the good stuff at the boys’ feet with a few choice verbal reassurances and the promise of some cold hard cash, it’s an offer neither can refuse. After all, the job sounds like a piece of cake – no stealing, no violence – a little light stand-over is all. What could be simpler than scaring a few old people out of their homes so Gianni can recoup some of the money he’s owed.

An easy five hundred quid. Or, if you’re au fait with your cockney – easiest monkey ever.

Or, is it?

I’m not letting any more out of the bag on this one, suffice to say the denouement to this gritty crime thriller is not for no nancy-boys.

Filmmakers: So, you’re done with your RomComs and gentle slice of life dramas. Want to add seedy underbelly crime-thriller to your reel? Ready to tackle real hard men characters, dark humour, and dialogue that sings with authenticity – not to mention a liberal amount of gore to top it all off?

Alright then guvnor, don’t bovver with the rest, get on it. Now. You heard. That’s an order, son. Why are you still here?

Pages: 6

Budget: No problems at all here. A few ramshackle locations will do you fine; and some seedy characters to fill the space!

About the reviewer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life. Over her career, she’s worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, trained as a FAD, and served professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail

About the writer: Dustin Bowcott is a self employed microbe retailer and father of four boys. He has enjoyed writing since the day he read his first novel. For Dustin, writing is something he has to do, when not writing, he’s thinking about writing and will absorb himself into multiple projects at one time. When he gets tired of writing one thing he moves onto another and has been known to work on three different stories in one day, writing for sometimes 12 hours straight and, on occasion, even longer. Dustin can turn his hand to any genre and has just finished first draft of a new children’s novel. Dustin is a BBC Writer’s Room finalist and a Shore Scripts finalist both in 2014. He is a produced and optioned writer, and has recently turned his hand to production, having produced his first short film with another in the pipeline that should be completed this year. Want to see what else he has in store? Give him a shout-out at dustin7375 “AT” gmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Monday, January 19, 2015

Bump in the Night – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Bump in the Night

A foul mouthed drug addict decides that burglary can get him his next fix, but he picks the wrong house and the wrong couple to mess with.

Our culture has such a schizophrenic view of old people. On one hand, we infantilize them. Awwwww, they’re so cute and polite. Innocent beings brimming with wisdom, and memories of days gone by. Then we discard ‘em like yesterday’s trash. Old folks’ facilities. Left to fend for themselves in broken down homes. Especially after the children move away. They’re vulnerable to falling; breaking that oh-so vulnerable hip. Not to mention violent home invasions by ruthless predators…

Meet Alexander and Agnes, 60s. A sweet couple living out their golden years in a comfy suburban neighborhood. We meet them in bed. They’re cuddled together – fast asleep. At least until they hear a noise.

It’s an intruder. Baz – a strung-out teen junkie in search of a score. Alexander and Agnes slip out of bed, and tiptoe quiet as mice downstairs.

Baz grabs Agnes’ purse, and turns to go. But his path is blocked by Alexander, wielding a baseball bat. He tells the old codger to F* off, but Alexander’s not deterred. For a mortal battle’s about to ensue. An epic fight for the ages.

Low budget and high entertainment, Bump in the Night has loads in its favor. Colorful characters. A wicked sense of humor. Twists. There’s even a moral hidden deep down in here: don’t assume that old people are helpless. They were once young bastards, too….

About the writer: Anthony Cawood is an aspiring screenwriter from the UK with a number of scripts in various stages of production, two of which have just wrapped shooting. His script, A Certain Romance, recently won in the Nashville Film Festival Screenwriting Competition (short script category). You can find out more at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Pages: 10

Budget: Pretty low. A handful of actors. A bar, and a house. That’s about as easy as it gets!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Monday, December 15, 2014

No BullScript Consulting – Danny Manus Script Review (Lowlife) - posted by wonkavite

In November, we reviewed Kosta Kondilopoulos’ Lowlife. As readers of Shootin’ the Shorts are aware, our goal at STS is to find new and promising writers, and provide them with the platform they need to get their work seen (then hopefully optioned, and produced!)

One of our not-so-secret weapons in this quest is Danny Manus of No BullScript Consulting. Having worked as a development executive in Hollywood, Danny is an in-demand script consultant, named by Creative Screenwriting Magazine at one of the “Top 15” consultants in their “Cream of the Crop” list.   Partnered with STS, Danny provides wonderfully detailed and helpful notes for the monthly STS feature script.  This coverage is provided free to the writer, and can be posted our site or kept confidential – at the writer’s discretion. But wait – there’s more!  Any script that gets a coveted “recommend” from tough but eminently fair Danny will be featured in his monthly newsletter and may also receive further exposure to his production contacts…

Below, please find Danny’s notes/coverage for Lowlife. Read, learn, comment…. and don’t forget to submit your best work for possible review!

**To submit a script, please visit STS at the page listed HERE. Danny can also be contacted directly via the No BullScript Consulting website at http://www.nobullscript.net/contact/. Or on Twitter @DannyManus.

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NO BULLSCRIPT ANALYSIS

 

Title:  Lowlife

Type of Material: Screenplay

Author:  Kosta K.

Number of Pages:  94

Submitted To:  Simply Scripts

Circa:  Present

Location:  Any City, USA

Genre: Thriller/Noir

Coverage Date:  12/1/14

Budget Range: Low-Medium

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LOGLINE: Trying to protect his friend, a criminal is forced back into bed with a dirty cop and the Russian Mob after a job gone wrong but this time he may lose everything he has left.

COMMENTS:  Kosta, thank you for submitting your script, “Lowlife” to Simply Scripts. The following notes and comments will go through what works well and what still needs to be worked on or changed in order to make this a more viable and commercial script.

Overall, this is a solid script and story, and a pretty fast and easy read. There are a couple strong action scenes, nice visuals, and you’ve crafted a likeable anti-hero that we root for even though we’re not sure why. The killer with a conscience story has worked many times before, and can certainly work again, but the story and tone needs to feel really original to stand out. And while this is a nice read, I think the biggest issue is the originality and making it truly stand out. Right now, I’m not sure what really makes Lowlife, and Ritchie’s character, seem much different than Ray Donovan on Showtime or films like Jack Reacher or Drive. In fact a couple scenes feel very similar to those films.

The script could use a stronger specific hook to it. I like the noir feel, but I would suggest going even more noir with it and that would make the voice seem even stronger. The writing is strong, but I think it could feel a bit more mysterious and suspenseful – a bit sleeker or sexier – and perhaps the scope of the story could feel a bit bigger. For me, the porn angle seems a bit comedic and it doesn’t seem important enough or dark enough for these mobsters, dirty cops, and killers to all turn on each other. One mobster gets the hotter girls for their videos, so the dirty cop wants him dead? It sounds a bit too petty for stone-cold killers and “business” men. It’s more original than drugs or weapons, but it adds a more comedic slant to the danger instead of a noir or action feel.

The twist or reveal that Pete is a Detective and the dirty cop they’ve been talking about, is unclear. We are never told when we meet him in Trent’s office that he is a cop, and we don’t even know it for sure when he is at Dimitri’s house after Gwen’s murder. We’re actually not told this until later in the second act, and I think this could be revealed and made clear much earlier in the script. On page 45, Nikki and Ritchie talk about “that cop” and on pg 46 Ritchie asks if she knows who “HE” is and she says “some dirty cop,” but we still don’t know for sure it’s PETE they are talking about until Pete says it on page 61. And Pete is never around any other cops, he’s never dressed as a cop, he’s never seen as a cop. I think it could be even creepier to see that character in his police uniform at some point, and it could make for a visual and more shocking reveal of whom he is.

Structurally, I think you have some wonderful turning points in the second act that keep the story going, first with Nikki killing Gwen and it being Pete who finds her phone and calls them; and then on page 71 when they get double-crossed at the party. Your midpoint is exciting, but the action scene with Mike, Franky and Rocco isn’t really connected to the story – it’s just a random fight sequence. But as far as “filler” scenes go, it’s a fun and exciting one.

I’m not sure where the first act actually ends though and the opening scene seems a bit muted and I’m not sure it’s totally necessary. You could start the script in the rain in the dark alley as the car pulls up. Without dialogue or interaction, I’m not sure what the opening scene with the sleeping girlfriend really gets you, or what it tells us. The threat Sammy makes against her only means something if we really feel a connection between them, and from the opening scene the blonde could be a wife, girlfriend, or just some one night stand he’s watching in the morning. The relationship could be defined a bit better in that first scene to show how important the girlfriend character is to Ritchie.

It’s unclear if the girlfriend is pregnant in the opening scene. Perhaps if you’re going to open with the girlfriend, showing her as pregnant and maybe seeing Richie touch her stomach or just look at it, without any dialogue in the scene still, would set up a much deeper and clearer connection. It would also set up a bit more of a clear time frame as we don’t know how long ago she gave birth, was killed, or when he killed Sammy. Plus setting up that she’s pregnant will make us wonder if it’s the baby in the hospital, or the girlfriend or someone totally different and make us wonder what happened to her. Then perhaps the dialogue in the hospital scene could be even stronger on page 4. Something like “Any update?” “Still fighting.”

We learn that the girlfriend died by being run over by a car – seemingly on purpose. Who was this blast from the past and was it the guy Ritchie killed? Hard to believe that Ritchie didn’t get vengeance for this “accident.” Or if there could be some greater connection between her death, the man responsible, and all the mob guys and killers he’s working for/with?

After the double-cross when Dimitri takes Ritchie and Nikki, the third act brings us plenty of fun action and revenge and is pretty non-stop to the end. I love how Nikki’s death seems to reignite the killer in Ritchie and make him realize that being a nice guy wasn’t getting him anywhere and everyone must die, save one – Heather the innocent porn star – to prove he only kills guilty people. And I really like your last beat where we think Ritchie might be leaving the bag of money in the Church but then last second realizes that’s not who he is and goes back and takes the bag back. I think that’s a great moment that nicely defines that Ritchie knows he has nothing left to live for, so he might as well be the person he has always been.

The one bit I didn’t quite understand or believe is why Ritchie would go to such lengths to destroy all the evidence and not get caught, but then wear bloody dirty clothes with evidence all over them to the hospital. As a professional killer who has cleaned up crime scenes before, this doesn’t sound like something he would do. He would probably throw his shirt into the fire at the cabin. I like that the cops let him go because they all hated the dirty Pete, though perhaps it’s a bit of a stretch since Ritchie did kill like 6 people. But if the cop told him that the reason is because exposing Pete and everything he was into would reverse dozens of cases, put criminals back on the street, and destroy the reputation of the police force – then there’s more of a rational reason to let Ritchie go.

Projects like these usually get made when a big enough actor wants to play the lead role. Anti-heroes have been a growing trend in TV and film, and those types of protagonists usually are attractive to actors because it allows them to play different layers and emotions. And Ritchie feels like he has SO much churning inside of him right under the surface, but very seldom does any of it come out. I like that Ritchie has something innocent driving him as motivation – his dying baby – and I like that he has a rough backstory that he’s been to prison for 5 years and refuses to go back. It gives him a bit more of a moral compass and shows that he has compassion and a fear, but I’m not sure what Ritchie’s goal is in the story.

He goes on these little jobs given to him by other people and he wants to clean up after Nikki to clear her from Gwen’s murder, but there’s no clear case or goal or THING that Ritchie needs to accomplish by the end except survive. I would think that with his deeper need of getting redemption or vengeance for what happened to his girlfriend and Sammy, and with everything that’s happened to him, he’d have his own personal mission but there isn’t one set up. And then that goal or mission would be ruined by what he has to do to save Nikki and by working with Pete again.

Ritchie’s connection with Nikki is likable and they have a nice chemistry, but we never get much depth or backstory about them. There is a line that intimates they possibly used to sleep together or date, but we never get any real information about them or their connection. She’s a likable character who brings energy and levity to the script, and her death is definitely the emotional strong point of the story – perhaps the one true emotional moment in the script for the audience. I kept waiting for her to pop up and still be alive.

However, she does sometimes feel like this little neurotic Chihuahua constantly yapping in Ritchie’s ear. She tells other people she’s not his girlfriend, she’s not his friend, and she’s not his partner. So what is she? Where did he find her? Why does he keep her around? I actually think it’s pretty funny that after being told by Mike that she’s about to get beaten and raped in front of her boyfriend, her only response is “he’s not my boyfriend.” It makes her seem like a tough girl, but we already know she’s not really because of what happened with Gwen and how freaked out she is.

It’s clear Ritchie has this history with Pete and this anger or guilt over what he did to Sammy in the opening scene because of Pete, but other than knowing they “used to run together,” we don’t know anything about Ritchie’s relationship with Sammy or why this affected him so greatly. Did he have to shoot his best friend? After Sammy, has Ritchie been searching for some sort of redemption? Because he’s still doing the same things he was doing when he killed Sammy, so I’m not sure exactly how he’s trying to change.

Overall, the dialogue is pretty strong. You have nice moments of levity, the description is sparse and clear and easy to visualize, and your characters do have personality that comes through their dialogue. I think the biggest note in terms of dialogue is that it doesn’t always feel as NOIR-ish as it could, especially in Ritchie’s voice. His cadence and the speed of his dialogue and his delivery should basically set the tone of the script. It’s a solid thriller, but to make it stand out, I think giving it more of a noir slant could help.

Just a few specific page notes –

Pg 36 – Typo – It should be BOBBY who says the line, “He doesn’t get through that door again” instead of Richie.

Pg 40 – Can cut the scene heading at bottom as it’s the same location she’s already in.

Pg 43 – We don’t know immediately that Dimitri is the husband, as we’ve never seen him before.

Pg 54 – This scene with the 3 against one (and even Ritchie’s line about it) is pretty reminiscent of the Jack Reacher scene outside the diner.

Pg 55 – “I’m the one who got the fucking brain facial” is a great line.

Overall, it’s an enjoyable and fast read with a castable lead character. It’s a perfectly serviceable script. I think the biggest issue is just making the story and tone stand out against so many other thrillers about killers with a conscience. Stick with it! Keep writing! And best of luck! Thanks again Kosta for submitting your script Lowlife” to Simply Scripts, and congratulations on being the featured script of the month.

NO BULLSCRIPT 20 POINT GRADING SHEET AND RECOMMENDATION:

PROJECT: CONSIDER

Elements Excellent Solid Needs Work Poor
Concept/Premise            X    
Story                X    
Structure          X    
Conflict/Drama            X    
Consistent Tone                      X    
Pacing        X    
Stakes                  X    
Climax   X    
Resolution                           X    
Overall Characters             X    
Protagonist         X    
Antagonist                X            
Dialogue                                 X    
Transitions                                 X    
Format, Spelling,   Grammar, Pg Count                      X    
Well Defined Theme                      X    
Commercial Appeal/Hook           X           
Overall Originality                                           X  
Production Value              X     
International Appeal              X    

         

 

 

 

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Family Man – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

 

Laptop-Shorts

Family Man

Before a member of a mob family can be named the new Capo, he has to take care of an unpleasant task to prove his loyalty to the family.

Mob movies are an interesting subculture… one which has spawned some – well, really seriously good sh*t.   Seriously: The GodfatherScarfacePulp Fiction. Reservoir DogsThe Sopranos.  The list goes on.  When done right, the genre seems to create some of the best quotes in film history, and some of the most memorable characters.  But since it’s been done so many times, how can a mob script find fresh material?

Family Man manages to pull it off.  Starting in familiar territory, FM fades in on Johnny Parisi, a loyal mob soldier that’s been handpicked as the new Capo.  You see, Frankie – the older Capo – doublecrossed the boss. As a result, they’re still scraping Frankie (and his dog) off his lawn. The thing is – Boss Lombardo doesn’t want a repeat performance.  So he’s testing Johnny first.  Before he gets his promotion, Johnny’ll have to take care of Frankie’s accomplice.  But when Parisi finds out who that is, all his plans go to hell.  Who’s the rat? And will Johnny pull the trigger? Or end up on the wrong end of Lombardo’s wrath?

If you wanna find out, you’re gonna have to open this script yourself. ‘Cause I ain’t gonna be the one to spill the beans…

About the writer: Gary Howell is an attorney who has been writing as a hobby for years, and his short “The Family Man,” led to a connection with an Australian film director. The two collaborated on a feature film, “Broad Daylight,” which is currently in pre-production, with filming to begin in New Orleans in July. He is currently working on two new features.

Pages: 10

Budget: Moderate.  This isn’t a Tarantino script – you won’t blow your budget on squibs.  But there are a moderate number of locations (both exterior and interior) and a healthy number of characters.  But the settings are pretty flexible; this could be shot most anywhere.

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

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