SimplyScripts.Com Logo

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Lowlife – Feature Length Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by simplyscriptshorts

Low-life

A small-time enforcer is pushed deeper into a world of violence and deceit when he finds himself indebted to the dirtiest cop on the street.

What is it about anti-heroes? They make such terrific cinema; in any genre you can name. The Maltese Falcon. Scarface. Pulp Fiction. The ambivalent protagonists of In Bruges. SF has it’s fill, as well: Han Solo, Snake Pliskin… Mad Max (to some degree.) All characters that live in violent, gritty worlds – skirting the crusted edge of morality. We love them, dammit, despite their flaws. Or perhaps because of them…

Thanks to writer Kosta Kondilopoulos, we can now add another name to the list: Ritchie Boland. A world weary hitman – living somewhere between the shadows of Film Noir, and blood-soaked Tarantino streets…

Lowlife opens much as other crime tales do… A run-down apartment, with rain battering the window pane. Ritchie’s waking up to no-name coffee… and a not-so-inexpensive blonde girlfriend. Cut to a desolate alleyway. Richie sits with colleague Sammy in a car. A nervous Sammy interrogates Ritchie as they wait for their mark. A dirty cop’s been putting the screws to him, asking uncomfortable questions. If Ritchie’s told him anything, he’ll put that pretty blonde of his on ice. A few bullets put Sammy’s questioning to an early end. And set Ritchie on a fateful path that’s not quite so cut and dried…

A few years pass. The blonde’s long gone; but Ritchie’s still stuck in his nowhere place. A violent errand boy for the Powers That Be – doing everyone’s dirty deeds. His latest gig for old friend Nikki Jergens: retrieving a bag of blow from some tweakers…. By any means necessary. A few dislocated shoulders later, Ritchie meets Nikki at a diner. She’s got a freelance job, she tells him. Something that pays enough to put them both in retirement. You see, her friend Gwen has an abusive husband. And she really (really, really) wants him gone. Ritchie turns down the offer: he’s got safer things to do. Like help Gangster Bobby Golden shake down a porn distributor for a return on his investment. Despite Nikki’s tears, Ritchie takes his leave. He’s too old to do the risky stuff anymore. He’ll stick with easier money.

…but is everything as it seems?

Ritchie heads to “Pink Monkey Studios” to squeeze money out of Bobby’s deadbeat colleague – and runs into an old acquaintance. Someone who knows quite a bit about Sammy’s demise. And intends to leverage it for favors. Across town, Nikki’s decided to take matters into her own hands – with disastrous results for her and Gwen. A panicked Nikki runs to Ritchie for help. And things spiral out of control. Gwen’s husband’s very much alive; with friends neither of them wants to meet. As double crosses deepen and plots twist, Ritchie’s past roars back for revenge. Leaving him with nowhere left to turn. And no way to protect the long hidden secrets (and people) that matter to him most of all…

Starkly written, Lowlife’s a breeze to read. And an easy shoot to bring to life. Much like QT’s Reservoir Dogs, Lowlife eschews fancy set pieces in favor of realistic – yet surprisingly non-gratuitous – violence. (And even a touch of humor.) Most importantly, this is one script where you’ll root for the anti-hero – despite his various misdeeds. That in itself is worthy the price of admission. Because making one’s characters bleed is easy. Making you care about the blood spilled…. an accomplishment that’s far harder.

About the writer: I’ve been writing for about four years now. I always loved it but managed to get constantly side-tracked by silly things like: finding a real job, getting married, having kids, a mortgage… I finally decided to stop making excuses (not completely) and write “for real”. I made it to the quarter-finals of the Nicholls Fellowship last year, the semi-finals of the Screencraft Fellowship earlier this year, and the finals of the Industry Insider competition featuring Sheldon Turner. I’m still pretty wet behind the ears, but for the first time in a long time, I actually refer to myself as a writer. I can always be reached at kostak “AT” kostak.com

Pages: 95

Budget: Relatively low. A few very affordable FX – but Lowlife is primarily a character driven story. Get the right actors and cinematographer, and you’re golden!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Friday, August 5, 2016

Lavender’s Blue – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

Laptop-Shorts

Lavender’s Blue

“A young thief finds compassion in the unlikely source of his arresting officer.”

Never underestimate the power of an effective film title. It’s the attention-getter. Titles can be quite literal (for instance Godzilla, The King’s Speech, or My Best Friend’s Wedding.) Or you may need to watch the movie to figure it out the reference: ala Enough Said, Jacob’s Ladder, and The Shawshank Redemption. Depending on who’s in control on movie night, sometimes the title is all an audience member knows going in. But – whichever direction you choose – the title needs to be relevant and stand out!

In Lavender’s Blue, the meaning of the title is subtle – emerging slowly as the drama enfolds. As the script opens, world-weary veteran Inspector Foster and young Sergeant Watts interrogate a sullen teen accused of stealing… of all things, a lavender scented gift pack of toiletries.

After a few grueling rounds of good cop/bad cop – and one rather sneaky maneuver on Foster’s part – they figure out the boy’s name: 17 year old Chris Turner. More digging uncovers the surprising reason for Chris’ theft. Foster and Watts find themselves faced with a decision: throw the book at the unlucky perp. Or take pity on the kid – bringing him (and his stolen loot) on an unexpected side trip…

An award winning tale, Lavender’s Blue is subtly written with multiple layers; perfect for any director looking to produce an emotionally complex drama that’ll stay with their audience long after credits roll.

About the writer: Boasting an MA in Scriptwriting for Film, Theatre, TV & Radio, MJ is an award winning writer, with shorts optioned and produced in countries as diverse as Croatia and Norway. Residing in sunny England, she is currently hard at work developing a series with the BBC Writersroom – as well as working on a number of features (including one low-budget horror and a fantasy adventure script.) Her website is available here: redcatwriter.wordpress.com/. MJ herself can be reached via mjhermanny – AT – gmail!

Pages: 5

Budget: Relatively low. Settings include an interrogation room and a “hospital” type setting. For your four main characters, make sure to get actors with a strong and nuanced emotional range. Because this script deserves to be done properly!

About the reviewer for Lavender’s Blue:California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Interrogation – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Interrogation

An interrogator employs questionable methods to extract information from a suspect.

There’s something about a good torture scene that just… stays with you. You know what we’re talking’ about: the dentist scene from Marathon Man. The ear removal in Reservoir Dogs.

Yet, there’s a fine line between an exquisitely painful scene and gratuitous torture porn. Make no mistake – there is a difference. One is an example of high writerly art; admittedly of the squeamish kind. The other is pure sadism… the visual rendering of unpleasant corners of the human psyche that are best left unexpressed (or crushed by energetic bouts of electroshock.)

Ah, but when a scene is of that first variety? Cinematic stuff like that scars you for life – in a good way. And it’s impossible to forget. The visuals burrow into one’s mind like memory maggots, and take up permanent residence in one’s bleeding brain.

And that’s certainly the case with Interrogation, by Zach Jensen. A vicious little short, Interrogation takes place in – you guessed it – an interrogation room populated by two charming gentlemen: Agent Dawes and Simon – an unfortunate soul whose hand is strapped to the table. ‘Cause, you see, Agent Dawes has a hammer. And pliers. And an orange (don’t ask.) And really, really sharp paper.   And he knows how to use them. Not surprisingly, things get ugly.

Needless to say, the torture depicted is quite brutal. If that’s all this script had going for it, it’d still be memorable – and imaginative. But Interrogation does have more. The banter between Dawes and Simon is surprisingly witty. And mystery lingers in the air. Why is Simon there? And exactly what is Agent Dawes fishing for? Then there’s that twist. But never mind. I’ve said too much already…

If you’re a director with dark and twisted sensibilities, then you’d better open Interrogation quick. ‘Cause perps like Simon eventually crack. And scripts like this get optioned – causing delicious suffering along the way…

About the writer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota.  He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script.  If for some reason you want to learn more about him, you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog.

Pages: 6

Budget: Pretty low. But be sure not to skimp on a few solid practical FX. No need to show everything (subtlety can be a good thing.) But a touch of blood here and there will enhance your audience’s heebie-jeebies even more.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, July 4, 2016

Who Killed Rosa Maria Morales – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by The Merrows

Who Killed Rosa Maria Morales?

The man who knows the truth about a mysterious murder lies in an ambulance after a heart attack. Detective Sanchez needs to question him before it is too late.

If you’re old enough, you probably remember the phrase “Who Shot J.R.?” It was an American obsession during the summer of 1980, after the season finale of Dallas. An unknown assailant had shot the show’s conniving protagonist, J.R. Ewing. With eight months before the next episode, the entire nation was thrown into a tailspin…

Who Killed Rosa Maria Rosales channels the same sort of obsession. But this time it’s all focused on one man – gritty homicide Detective Sanchez. A heart attack victim lies prone on the floor, teetering on the precipice of death. As a frantic paramedic scrambles to resuscitate his patient, Detective Sanchez looms over the barely-conscious man – grilling him mercilessly.

You see, Rosa Maria Morales has been horribly murdered. And Detective Sanchez’s determined to find out who did the monstrous deed – before the secret’s taken to the grave.

As paddles shock and monitors beep, Detective Sanchez yells out a string of suspect names. The cheating lover? Rosa’s sister? The Taco Mogul? Sanchez mercilessly batters the stricken man with questions. This is one lawman not to be denied.

It’s down to the wire – with everything at stake. Will Detective Sanchez solve the case before his witness flat-lines? A better question perhaps might be… why does he want to know?

A sweet who-dunnit with a fun twist, the read for Rosa’s an absolute hoot. And perfect for mystery loving directors – tongue planted firmly in mid-cheek.

About the writer: Relatively new in screenwriting, Manolis Froudarakis has won two awards in short screenplay competitions. His main focus is comedy – preferably, comedy with a little edge. You can contact him at: mfroudarakis@yahoo.gr

Pages: 5

Budget: Low (once you get your hands on some ambulance stock footage, and miscellaneous EMS equipment)

About the reviewer: Scott Merrow co-writes screenplays with his wife Paula. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy… the whole nine yards. Wanna give them a shout out? They’re available at scott-paula “AT” comcast.net

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, May 9, 2016

Last Shot – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Dane Whipple

Last Shot (aka Baby Shoes)
Shoot first, die later.

Where the road to perdition meets the highway to nowhere, there sits a small café. And in that café there sits a man, calmly reading the newspaper, skimming the classifieds. When he notices an ad for ‘Baby Shoes’, our man moves to the pay phone and places a call.

But, the transaction that’s about to take place doesn’t involve any actual shoes. You see, our man’s name is Baby Shoes, and he is not just any man, he’s a hitman. You know it well – the lethal kind.

With the information on his target secured, we ride along with Baby Shoes as he carries out his latest job…

….or at least attempts to. Turns out not everything goes as smoothly as Baby Shoes (and his employer) had planned.

After a botched first shot, all hell breaks loose. His target on the run, Baby Shoes races after his prey in hot pursuit, setting off a rock-em sock-em, high-octane action chase sequence that will literally blow your socks off. Well – ok – not literally, but somebody is getting something blown off, I guarantee that. But who?

Will the target live to see another day, or will Baby Shoes take his last shot?

Everyone loves a good hitman movie. From Collateral to Machete, it’s practically its own genre. Last Shot provides a strong character in the vein of no less than Leon: The Professional – with a slam-bam action pace that will keep even the most stubborn audiences on the edge of their seats.

But don’t think this is a mindless six-page car chase, oh no. The central arch provides us with a weightier intelligence more akin to Killing Them Softly; providing a director with ample opportunity to highlight directorial skills in action as well as straight drama.

Think you’ve got what it takes to be the last man standing? Then grab your silencer and put on your black gloves. You’ve got a job to do.

Pages: 6

Budget: Medium. Limited actors but multiple locations, props, and an action sequence.

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple is like ten-thousand spoons when all you need is a knife. He is currently working on that screenplay everybody keeps talking about: The Wild Age. Contact him at dane.whipple (at) live.com

About the writer: Elaine Clayton is a London-based screenwriter, who has written several well-received shorts and is currently working on her first feature length scripts. Comfortable in a broad range of genres, Elaine has an innate sense of structure and arc development. Contact her at Elaine_clayton (AT) Hotmail(.)co(.)uk

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Out of Character – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Out of Character
Screenwriter Jack creates characters that live and breathe… maybe TOO much?

Ever watch Will Ferrell films? Well, there’s one particular flick you should see. It’s called
Stranger Than Fiction – a tale about a man named Harold Crick, who discovers one day that he is in fact a character in one of Emma Thompson’s novels. (Yes, Emma Thompson the actress – known in certain circles as Nanny McPhee.) Fortunately, Harold Crick’s a gentle soul; despite the wringer Emma puts him through, he’s pretty harmless all the way.

But what if a character you wrote was far more dangerous and… unhappy with their fate? What would they do to their creator? By Final Fade Out, would YOU be safe?

That’s the very question screenwriter Jack faces in R.E. McManus’ twisty short Out of Character: when one of his shadiest characters arrives at his doorstep – armed, angry, and brimming with demands.

When Character opens, Jack’s writing in his claustrophobic unorganized study – surrounded by empty pizza boxes, half-finished cups of coffee and writer’s manuals galore. (A scene all too real for some writers.) Just then, the doorbell rings. Jack answers – and finds himself face-to-face with… a man named Ken. There’s a pistol in Ken’s hand. Strangely familiar features on his face.

Ken forces his way inside.

Tense bantering ensues – until the stranger-than-truth reality is revealed. Ken’s one of Jack’s characters – disgruntled and demanding change! According to Ken, Jack created him a bit too fat. A lot too poor. And with too much attitude to let such things slide. Using his revolver to do the talking, Ken insists that Jack give him a thinner waistline, a better car, and a supermodel girlfriend as well (can you say ‘join the club’?)

But can Jack do such things, and shove all creative integrity aside?

We won’t spoil the ending – promise. But needless to say, the tension rachets up quick. Jack attempts to comply with Ken’s milder demands, but conspires to take down his creation… before the plot gets too wild…

Equally humorous and tense, Out of Character is a great comedic dark script, stuffed with Easter Eggs for directors and writers alike. Grab it before someone writes YOU off. And the next time you compose a scene? Think real careful about Flat Slob #2’s feelings. Maybe it’s not wise to piss him off that much.

Budget – Low. Two actors, one location (a house), one computer and one gun.

Pages – 9

About the reviewerMitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts) offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts “AT” gmail and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer:

R.E. McManus was born in England, of Irish roots. Hence he was always a little confused. He has since travelled the globe, and noted what he saw on his travels. He’s been writing since he could pick up a pen. The fact they were IOUs is neither here nor there.

He fell in love with film when he first saw 2001: A Space Odyssey at the age of six. Although he’s still not sure about the spelling of Odyssey. It’s still looks wrong,

He loves Fincher, Hitchcock and Kubrick. And Faith No More. And Elvis. He even has a dog named after him. This seemed like a good idea until he went to the park.

Want more information? (Just say yes – you know you do!) Then head over to his website at http://rendevous.yolasite.com. Or email him directly at redarcy2000 “AT” yahoo.co.uk

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, April 8, 2016

Congratulations to MJ Hermanny – Thicker Than Water Optioned! - posted by wonkavite

You’ve got to love success stories.  No matter who the writer is: any genre and every gender. Hailing from every corner of the world; if you’re a wordsmith, we love you all.

Though – we have to admit… there’s something *particularly* fun about hard-boiled tales coming from seasoned female writers.  You know, like Sue Grafton or Patricia Cornwell. Okay, maybe we’re biased.  But M.J.’s Hermanny’s a class act –  of the crime addled, film noir style.

So… STS is thrilled to announce that her reviewed short Thicker Than Water has now been optioned! That’s good news right there.  And you know what’s better?  That she’s got more available.

So – give My Life for Yours a fresh read.  It’s gritty, dark and packs a punch.  And missing THIS one for your next project would be a crime!

******

My Life for Yours

A man makes amends for leading an innocent astray.

Remember those anti-drug commercials in the eighties? Don’t do drugs? Crack is whack? Often more laughable than effective, the intent was to show kids the ugly side of drugs… scare them straight. A well meaning endeavor – even if it did devolve into a punchline.

Well, they ain’t got sh*t on this short gem.

As My Life opens, muscle bound jock Jason drags a drug-addled Mandy towards an abandoned house. A rotted shack in the middle of nowhere, no-one around for miles. There’s a stained bed in the corner, outfitted with chains. And a video camera set up for filming.

Readers will cringe as Jason shackles Mandy’s ankles. Whips out the drugs, and takes some hits. Because everyone knows what’s coming next. Kidnapping. Rape. Maybe worse…

Well, not exactly. Because Jason’s got other plans in mind – and a dark, gritty lesson for his girlfriend that’ll forever change both their lives.

Who is this couple – and why are they in this situation? As Mandy gets ever more frantic, a stoned Jason recalls the “Sid and Nancy” tale: a series of flashbacks about the innocent girl he met years ago… and the way he’s watched both of them change. And it sure ain’t for the better.

Though it wears the trappings of a thriller, My Life is at heart a romance: a clever, tautly written tale of how far someone will go to save the one they love the most.

Think you know where it’s going? Think again…

About the writer: Boasting an MA in Scriptwriting for Film, Theatre, TV & Radio, MJ is an award winning writer, with shorts optioned and produced in countries as diverse as Croatia and Norway. Residing in sunny England, she is currently hard at work developing a series with the BBC Writersroom – as well as working on a number of features (including one low-budget horror and a fantasy adventure script.) Her website is available here: redcatwriter.wordpress.com/. MJ herself can be reached via mjhermanny – AT – gmail!

Pages: 6

Budget: Low – 2 primary characters, unnamed partygoers, one vehicle and a dingy house that no-one has a use for, anyway…

About the guest reviewer: A writer himself, Leegion’s works can be found on www.simplyscripts.com.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, April 4, 2016

Tower of Strength – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by KP Mackie

Tower of Strength
Good Guys vs. Bad Guys isn’t always well-defined…

Nothing’s more intense than a good cop story.

Crime tales have built-in tension. There are always good guys – usually the police. And the Bad Guys run the gamut of Evil: one hundred and fifty Shades of “grey”. For anyone who loves such gritty tales, you can usually expect one pivotal scene: usually with three ingredients – a cop, an interrogation room, and a suspect.

And the conflict goes wild from there.

The good cop in Jeremy Storey’s Tower of Strength is a detective named Peter. When TOS opens, Peter has suspect Alex in custody – imprisoned in a cramped interrogation room. As Peter turns his tape recorder on, the lightning quick questions begin.

PETER
Please state your name for the record.

ALEX
Alex Barnes.

PETER
Where do you live?

ALEX
456 Dorchester.

PETER
Where do you work?

ALEX
Crescent Security.

Sound familiar? Well, just you wait.

Because, just about the time you think Peter may elicit that confession of guilt: “Peter’s voice starts to fade. Alex looks over his shoulder to the outside. He’s no longer listening… just looking at the sky” …

The next scene describes Alex “tightening a few bolts” on his son Ben’s new bicycle. And hence the tragic flashback begins…

What’s the “gotcha” of this story?

Well, Peter’s got a grisly murder to solve. He thinks – in fact, he’s damn certain — that this “ruggedly handsome, athletic” father is somehow involved in the bloody mix.

So who exactly has been killed?

No spoiler here: but there are bad cartel guys across the border. A gang of murderous thugs and monsters that take-no-prisoners-alive.

PETER
These ‘monsters’ are like locusts. For every one put away or put down another three will appear. For every eye they take two. They fear no one.

ALEX
You’re worried about retaliation?

PETER
It’ll be a bloodbath.

Absolutely. Alex is a guy with a different agenda – one he keeps very close to his chest. Will Peter be able to solve the murderous crime? Does he even have the right suspect?

Maybe, maybe not… And for folks who love crime stories, that mystery’s the juicy part. 🙂

Are you a director on the hunt for a riveting drama – one with adrenaline-pumping tension and pace? Then TOS could be your fix. It doesn’t get much better than this…

Pages: 21

Budget: Low. No expensive action sequences. Several interior shots of a police station interrogation room, bedroom, kitchen, garage, and car. Exterior shots of a house and car. Two strong, convincing actors for Peter and Alex. Just enough extras to put a nice handful to work.

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working on an animated feature.

About the Writer: Jeremy Storey has been writing on-and-off for the last fifteen years. He’s dabbled in stage plays, screenplays and shorts. He even wrote a novel once, but the less said about that effort, the better. He’s had a few things produced along the way (a feature (REWIND), two shorts (GOOD DEEDS and ADRIFTING) and a play (LAST CUP OF SORROW). He’s even done quite well in a number of screenwriting contests over the years. However, it’s the process of writing and collaborating on creative projects with likeminded folks that really makes him happy and content. He’s delighted to be asked to participate in Simplyscripts, and is genuinely looking forward to connecting with other writers, producers and directors. Contact him at jeremystorey “AT” yahoo!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, March 21, 2016

The Role of the Dice – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by LC

THE ROLE OF THE DICE

The fate of two couples is determined by a single roll of the dice.

Couples game night. It’s very much a tradition for some. And no – we’re not referring to some kinky type of seventies Key Party, or Twister played in the buff. We’re talking about a board game that is an institution to most, one that’s been around since the nineteen-thirties – the classic game of Monopoly.

Game nights can be great fun. There’s nothing like combining a healthy dose of friendly rivalry while cultivating memories and bonhomie with good friends. Cracking the caps off a few cold ones, opening a bottle of wine, snacking on some appetizers. Then sit back and let the games begin. Of course, there’s the little matter of winning being a whole lot more fun than losing, not to mention playing fair – in life, just as in the game.

In The Role Of The Dice, our hosts for the night are Chuck and Hannah, their guests, well to do friends Demetri and his heavily pregnant wife Stephanie. Expertly presiding over the entire affair is writer David Lambertson.

Remember I mentioned ‘fun’ and ‘playing fair’?  Straight off the bat our host Chuck doesn’t appear to be enjoying much of either.  To say he’s in a bad mood is an understatement – the words ‘grudge match’ instantly come to mind. But why, we wonder? Well, Chuck’s got his reasons. While out on patrol today (Chuck’s a cop) he discovered a little wheeling and dealing going on behind his back, and he’s about to exact revenge.  Exactly what he saw we’ll leave up to you to find out… We will say, how he enacts justice, is just as captivating as why.

Equally captivating is the skill with which writer David Lambertson spins this very clever yarn by juxtaposing the action with the moves of the Monopoly game. We watch as with every roll of the dice Chuck’s rage intensifies, and with each juicy revelation the subsequent plays on the Monopoly board mimic his state of mind – as do the escalating tensions of the other players around the table.  Mind games, double entendre, (Chuck’s first weapons of choice) – until it becomes patently obvious that Chuck has the monopoly over all of the players at the table, and that the game is about to take a deadly turn.

One of two entries tied for Reader’s Choice Simply Scripts One Week Challenge, The Role Of The Dice is a skillfully written and well plotted thriller that’s already proven to be a crowd favourite.

Filmmakers: Want to invest in something that’s a sure fire winner? Don’t leave this one to Chance, and Do Not Pass Go, it’s time to make your move. You never know, this might just be money in the bank.

Pages: 12

Budget: Minimal. Get a board game, good actors – a little bit more – and you’re done!

About the reviewer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She has also worked professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She is thrilled her first ever entry (Simpatico) into a Screenplay Comp – The LA Comedy Festival ‘Short’ screenplay division took out Top 3 Finalist and hopes the high placing will be a continuing trend. 🙂 Libby would love to see her words come to life on screen. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail

About the writer, Dave Lambertson: I took up writing rather late in life having already been retired before I put pen to paper (okay – finger to computer key) for the first time.  My favorite genres to read and write are dramedies and romantic comedies.

In addition to this short, I have written four features; “The Last Statesman” (a 2015 PAGE finalist and a Nicholl’s and BlueCat quarterfinalist), “The Beginning of The End and The End” (a PAGE Semi-Finalist). Taking Stock (a drama) and a new comedy – “Screw You Tube”. Want to learn more? Reach Dave at dlambertson “AT” hotmail!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Search with Google

    Custom Search SimplyScripts

Award Season Screenplays - New!

Great Vocab

Subscribe to the SimplyScripts mailing list

    Email Address

Featured SimplyScripts Blogs

ScriptSearch

Advertisement

More Navigation

Latest Entries

Categories

Script of the Day
December 16, 2017

Advertisement

Donate


Advertisement



Writers I dig

Search Amazon

Search Sheet Music




SimplyScripts Logo