SimplyScripts.Com Logo

Monday, May 23, 2016

Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse
Life after the zombie apocalypse is harsh and uncompromising. But for two stoners holed up in an apartment with a lifetime supply of weed, it’s more like an inconvenience.

Remember when Seth Rogen and Co. faced the biblical apocalypse in This Is the End? A few of them stumbled successfully through doomsday, but how would they fare if they were faced with a zombie apocalypse instead? This is the very question asked by James Barron’s The Slacker’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse.

The answer? Not too well. Not at all.

Faced with Z Day and barricaded in their dorm, three friends (Mark, Steve and Liam) find themselves in a terrible pickle when their food runs out, leaving them starving and trapped – or worse. They intensely debate what to do: Steve and Liam vote to hold out one more day… aided by hits from their favorite bong. But Mark, the sensible non-stoner, insists they need to send someone outside to gather supplies and do recon. But who should be the lucky one?

Borrowing a cue from This Is the End, the trio draw toothpicks: he who pulleth the shortest stick is doomed to venture into the great unknown. Unfortunately for Mark, he’s inevitably chosen to leave for the munchie run – through a terrifying, zombified world.

What happens next? Well, without spoiling the finish, things go about as well as can be expected. And definitely not as planned.

A fun, chuckle-a-minute script, Slacker’s Guide has lots of things: stoner humor, Millennial appeal – and zombie action (no kidding). Scoop this up now… or wait until you take another hit from your bong for creative inspiration.

Fair warning though: act fast. This script might be picked up faster than a bag of Doritos in a stoner’s dorm.

Budget: Mid to high. A few locations (dorm room, hallway, stairway, food store). Lots of zombies, three good buddies and some props. Although, if you’re packing weed, you’ve got one of the major props covered already.

Pages: 14

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts) offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts “AT” gmail and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer, James Barron: Newly discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Friday, May 20, 2016

Course Listing Unavailable – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Course Listing Unavailable
An ambitious student signs up for an internship program promising real world, hands-on experience. Who knew bloodthirsty demons would be involved?

For today’s youth, the challenge of getting a good job has never been tougher. Many are determined to do anything that will enhance their resumes in the eyes of employers. Taking “useful” classes, getting internships, and doing extra-curricular activities are just a few examples of what diligent individuals do to spruce up that valuable sheet of paper.

The protagonist in Course Listing Unavailable, 17-year-old Gortat Emmanuel, is just another determined Ivy League freshman with a whiff of intelligent innocence about him. A mix-up in paying the tuition has meant he’s one class short of the minimum semester credit, and so he sees a counselor to get into a subject that appeals to him.

But every time the counselor enters the course he wants, there’s a problem.

Organic Chemistry? Unavailable. Biology? Unavailable. Ecology? Yup…unavailable. As a last resort, the advisor offers Gortat a chance for some real world experience: a month shadowing a service professional. Because the last guy who did it dropped out.

That’s all the information available. Apart from a name: Mr Shephard. Despite this, Gortat accepts, still eager to learn. And so on his first day, he’s dressed up as if he’s the President attending their inauguration.

However, Gortat’s destination isn’t as beautiful as the White House. Unless you’re into dilapidated buildings and tales of wasted lives in needle format littering the ground.

And the professional isn’t some smarmy doctor. Turning up in a classic American muscle with uninviting objects abundantly decorating the interior, Max Shephard invites Gortat in for his “education”. There’s no textbooks. No worksheets either. There’s only one rule, and it ain’t a typical one:

MAX
…no matter what happens
you will not puke in this car.

This may sound easy enough to obey until Max’s profession is revealed…demon hunter. Not quite what our Ivy League kid was expecting. In addition, it transpires that the supposed dropout dropped out of life…unwillingly. Oh, and for his first day on the job, he’s got to complete a practical helping Max eradicate the beast responsible for failing the previous student. Turns out “real world experience” means “other world experience” in this case.

Will Gortat pass his practical? Will he break the one rule? Will he even survive? Only one thing’s assured: direct this one well, and judges at film festivals will be giving you full marks!

Pages: 16

Budget: Okay, there’s a bit of FX involved in here. But nothing a skilled director can’t – and won’t want to – tackle!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Newly discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, April 29, 2016

Congratulations to Pia Cook – Initiation Optioned! - posted by wonkavite

Please join us in a hearty cheer to writer Pia Cook.  Her short script Initiation has been optioned (and in fact, is now in post)!

Not that this is any surprise: Born and raised in Sweden, Pia Cook has SEVERAL produced features and shorts to her name – full IMDB credits here. She started writing screenplays in 2006 and has written over seventy short screenplays and ten features. (Yeah… that’s not a typo. Seven ZERO.)

And – knowing Pia – there’s plenty more where that came from.

Directors seeking their next project are urged to contact Pia at  Gatortales “AT” gmail, and check out another of her reviewed shorts here:

Fit (Comedy): A “Biggest Loser” contest turns into a case of one-upmanship that gets wildly out of hand.

Truth or Dare (Horror): We all have our secrets….

Hero’s Gift (Drama): A young boy learns that not all presents come in a box with a fancy wrapper. Some of the best presents are not even wrapped at all.

The Riding Hood’s Creed (Horror): Lonnie was supposed to just take her back to Grandma’s house. But something overcame him along the way.

Heart of Coal (Horror): A renowned female psychologist ruminates over serial killer personalities – and the horror they’ve wreaked on her life…

Old Wounds (Drama): A down and out loser gets an unexpected letter in the mail.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Congratulations to Michael O’Farrell – Geoff Optioned!! - posted by wonkavite

Please join STS in a round of applause to Michael O’Farrell – whose satirical comedy (and goofball gem) Geoff has now been optioned to Director Vivek Kolli.

Want to contact Michael and see what else he has available? Ring him up at Michael.ofarrell “AT” knology DOT net! Quick – before the next script gets away! 😛

About the writer: Michael O’Farrell is a mathematician who worked on the Space Shuttle Program and now writes fiction. Stories that obviously “add up” and get grabbed…

Friday, April 22, 2016

Speaking Test – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by LC

SPEAKING TEST
Granted, Safeer’s English “not good”, but neither is his examiner.

The job interview has a long history with filmmakers. There’s terrific raw material to be mined especially in the comedy genre. Just take a look at Owen Wilson hamming it up in You, Me And Dupree, Monty Python’s skit The Lion Tamer with John Cleese and Michael Palin; Big Keith’s Appraisal in The Office, and Kevin Spacey’s turn in American Beauty – ‘would you like smiley-fries with that’?

In reality, job interviews are seldom easy and always challenging. Preparation is essential, as are nerves of steel. It’s essential to put your best foot forward. After all this is high-stakes stuff – this is your life, your future. More often than not you get one chance to make that all important first impression.

In Speaking Test, Manolis Froudarakis’ main character, Safeer, is determined to impress. A foreign national from an undisclosed country he has an extra challenge to overcome – English is evidently not his first language. Safeer’s applying for a job as a private investigator. He’s worked at the job successfully in his own country for the past four years. Now all he has to do is pass a test for ‘oral proficiency’ or rather, overcome the language barrier and convince the powers that be that he is indeed the man for the job.

This is no easy feat, especially when The Examiner is a man named Colton – a condescending, obnoxious, prejudiced and racist upstart who does little to disguise his disdain for Safeer by reacting to his test answers with a series of smirks, sneers and guffaws. He continues by stereotyping Safeer and ultimately rejecting his application.

SAFEER
(baffled)
My English good?

Colton laughs even harder. Safeer gulps.

SAFEER
Please, please! … Good detective is
important. Me, I search good, I
find many things.

COLTON
So you could find another
job, if necessary, right?

SAFEER
Other job?

COLTON
You know, like… in a restaurant…
(slowly, with exaggerated gestures)
Plates. Glasses. Water. You wash.

With those final words the interview is over and Safeer is shown the door. Little does Colton know however that by ignorantly equating Safeer’s broken English with stupidity he is the one who’s just made a big mistake. Safeer is nobody’s fool and he’s about to prove it by utilizing the very talents for which he’s just been passed over. Oh, such sweet irony.

Filmmakers: Want a cleverly plotted comedy with an equally powerful message? One that delivers with a terrific punchline guaranteed to have your audiences laughing in the aisles?

Well, don’t delay. Apply now! We predict this one will have applicants lined up around the block.

* We also recommend you read this imagining the role of Safeer being played by the late great Peter Sellers, the author’s inspiration for the character. Alternately, Sacha Baron Cohen would also do the trick. J

Budget: Minimal: yet more reason to interview and “hire” this one!

Pages: 5

About the reviewer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She has also worked professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She is thrilled her first ever entry (Simpatico) into a Screenplay Comp – The LA Comedy Festival ‘Short’ screenplay division took out Top 3 Finalist and hopes the high placing will be a continuing trend. Libby would love to see her words come to life on screen. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail

About the writer: Manolis Froudarakis has won two awards in short screenplay competitions. His main focus is comedy – preferably, comedy with a little edge. You can contact him at: mfroudarakis@yahoo.gr

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

iRobot – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

I Robot

It’s Man Vs. Roomba when Octogenarian Roy receives a surprise present from his daughter

The ever widening dangers and potentials of technology. A common theme in both literature and film, the topic spans the gamut of genres. SF/Horror: Hal in 2001. Short Circuit (Comedy). Even Romance – Spike Jonze’s acclaimed SF film Her.

And cantankerous old people? No script writer can go wrong with that! Geezers aways make for colorful characters. Betty White in Lake Placid. The entire cast of Cocoon

Put those two factors into a short. Add a touch of dark humor, and the result is guaranteed to be memorable.

As iRobot opens, so does old man Roy’s door. Cranky and frail, he harasses the poor teen Postman relentlessly. He asks the kid a million questions. Insists on getting I.D. Eventually, Roy pulls the package from his hands. Slams the door in the kid’s face.

Back in his kitchen, Roy opens the box: it’s a surprise present from daughter Wendy. A fully automated Roomba style vaccuum cleaner; designed to help around the house. Though perpetually unimpressed, Roy turns the device on. He sets it down and gives it a spin.

…but the new-fangled gizmo does more than spin. It whirrs and clicks. And starts to clean. Mesmorized, Roy watches the bot “do its thing.” After conducting an initial patrol across the floor, the robot circles back – and slams into Roy’s ankle. Before you can yell “that tears it!” the war is on. A cat and mouse game ensues between Roy and his mechnanical nemesis. It may not be a Terminator, but this is one Roomba that’s ready to rock and roll. And not necessarily in a good way…

Easy to shoot, iRobot can be played several ways. Horror. Or tongue in cheek satire. But turn it on and give it your spin. It’s a fun tale of Man vs. Machine, with a lighthearted combination of genres.

About Anthony: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Pages: 10

Budget: Very low budget. Three actors and a roomba’s all you need.

Read iRobot

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Keeping it Fresh – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Keeping it Fresh
Ken and Ruth have done it all. Except this.

What are you willing to do to keep things fresh? That’s a question many couples in their 60s dare to ask, and Ken and Ruth do their best to answer.

Does Fresh mean honest? Or just exciting? And when the stakes are ‘whatever needs to be done to share one’s life’, how can a couple truly know?

As veteran writer Rick Hansberry’s script opens, we meet Ken and Ruth in their well worn family car; tersely discussing their “action plan.” Ruth’s awash with nerves – her hands playing with a folded piece of paper. Ken tries to be sensitive to her concerns, but fails miserably at every attempt.

Where is this duo going? And why?

Their destination – a grocery store. What on Earth could be nerve racking there?

Soon, we discover Ken and Ruth are in… a race. Of what kind? The truth’s unclear. But what unfolds next is a comedy of errors – a wondrous blend of anxiety and charm. Imagine the slapstick as Ken and Ruth dodge obstacles, friends, enemies, wet floors, and – of course – time.

What will the finish line reveal? We won’t spoil the surprise (or the produce). But you will find a warm, sophisticated comedy – ala a young June Squibb or Seymour Cassell.

This is a script with tons of buy-one-get-two-free.  Including: a budget friendly tale, featuring characters of a “specific” (and underrepresented) age. All of which makes this story stand out – and write it’s way into even old and jaded hearts.

Need some older actors? Consider giving your parents’ “cool” friends something to do for a day. But regardless of who you cast, you’ll charm your way into festivals with this Fresh, young-at-heart gem!

Budget: All that’s needed are two good actors, and access to a deli or supermarket – at least a few aisles.

Pages: 6

About the reviewer: Rachel Kate Miller is a veteran of the feature animation industry, having worked on several Oscar winning films, bringing stories to life. In 2012, she left animation to move to Chicago and run the design department for President Obama’s reelection campaign. She is now living in New York, writing, consulting on various projects and creating an educational animated series for elementary students focused on engaging kids in science.

About the Writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” His first feature is set to be released in the summer of 2014. Trailer available here . He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, March 28, 2016

Geoff – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by wonkavite

Geoff
Geoff’s met his perfect mate. Now, he’s just got to tie the knot…

When you find your perfect match, how do you take it to the next level?

Well, by popping the question of course! Throughout the centuries, marriage has been the classic way to declare: I’ve decided – this one’s for me!

For some people, that’s more difficult than others. Perhaps your burning love isn’t traditional: maybe it’s a coupling that makes you happy – but causes society to get all cranky and frown.

Meet Geoff. The titular character in Michael O’Farrell’s cute satiric script, our hero’s in just such a pickle. Ready to commit to his true love, we first meet Geoff on his Big Day. Walking into the chapel. Meeting the rickety Justice of the Peace (assisted by his old and sentimental wife.)

But who does Geoff have at his side? Robert – in a matching tux. Given recent advances with LBGT rights, you’ve got to ask… who’s exactly marrying whom? If you think that’s obvious, think again. You’ll soon find out how wrong you are!

Sweet and smart, Geoff is a short that turns the marriage question on its head. Since love is love, why cling to outdated rules? Assuming everyone’s consenting and adult, why stick with vanilla marriage … or with ANY gender at all? Aren’t there more options to try?

Some of the most classic comedies are those that “marry” goofiness with satire (without necessarily picking a ‘side’). Given its many twists and turns, Geoff falls right in line.

You want to make the STS staff the happiest people on Earth? Then say “yes”, and give this cute script a read – and imagine Bill Murray as Geoff himself…

The result? You’ll be laughing all the way down the aisle. And winning festivals, as well!

Budget: Minimum. All that’s needed are some actors with great comedic timing. And preferably Bill Murray (or his clone). If you can reach his agent, that is.

Pages: 7

Reviewer: Rachel Kate Miller is a veteran of the feature animation industry, having worked on several Oscar winning films, bringing stories to life. In 2012, she left animation to move to Chicago and run the design department for President Obama’s reelection campaign. She is now living in New York, writing, consulting on various projects and creating an educational animated series for elementary students focused on engaging kids in science.

Writer: Michael O’Farrell is a mathematician who worked on the Space Shuttle Program and now writes fiction. He can be reached at michael.ofarrell “AT” knology DOT net.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Love Can Wait – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

Love Can Wait

After an accident involving an old ring, Eric is tormented by the suspicion that love can indeed wait.

Light, fresh… and lots of fun. Those are the key ingredients to a good rom-com. Sprinkle some sympathetic characters into the mix. (And don’t forget the comedic frosting. Vanilla-strawberry, if you please!)

It sounds simple… But one look at what passes for comedy these days will prove it’s not that easy. You need a good script to provide the foundation – to bind your components deliciously!

Fortunately, Love Can Wait by Manolis Froudarakis is the perfect recipe. As this light-hearted comedy opens, twenty year olds Eric and Julie relax on a hill, enjoying an afternoon picnic. Love is clearly in the air; they’re seconds from becoming engaged. Julie shows Eric the ring her grandpa gave to his beloved when he proposed. She reminisces how grandma promised she’d wait forever. However long it would take…

Sensing the perfect moment, Eric gets down on one knee – and slips the ring on Julie’s finger. But before either can say “I do”, a terrible accident occurs… landing Eric in the hospital!

As Eric wakes and struggles to clear his head, Julie’s the first thing he sees. But the woman before him is ancient… the diamond ring sparkling on a wrinkled finger.

Has their love stood the ultimate test of time? Could Julie have waited sixty years? A simple story with a clever twist, LCW is sure to be a hit with audiences. It’s short, endearing and funny. The perfect dessert for directors with a comedic sweet tooth!

About the writer: Relatively new in screenwriting, Manolis Froudarakis has won two awards in short screenplay competitions. His main focus is comedy – preferably, comedy with a little edge. You can contact him at: mfroudarakis@yahoo.gr

Pages: 3

Budget: Basic. Locations include a simple picnic setting, a space to replicate a hospital room – and three characters. Oh, and that diamond ring. (Real or prop, it’s up to you!)

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Search with Google

    Custom Search SimplyScripts

One Week Challenge

SimplyScripts Newsletter

    Subscribe to the SimplyScripts mailing list

    * indicates required


    Help Forever Red get made! Got no coin? Don't sweat it, comrade. You can still help by following the campaign on Seed and Spark!

Award Season Screenplays - New!

Featured SimplyScripts Blogs

ScriptSearch

Advertisement

More Navigation

Great Vocab

Latest Entries

Categories

Script of the Day
October 23, 2017

    The Tenderest Cuts by Alexander Brauck (PrussianMosby ) writing as Anonymous

    When a couple rebuffs their sex-obsessed roommate, they set free her inherited psychological craftsmanship.
    Discuss it on the Forum

    *Randomizer code provided by Cornetto.

Advertisement

Donate


Advertisement



Writers I dig

Search Amazon

Search Sheet Music




SimplyScripts Logo