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Monday, July 18, 2016

Love Glow – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Love Glow
Weird things can happen when love is involved.

Love is a powerful motivator – whether it pertains to friends, family or significant others. What people will not do for loved ones is a short list; and it has the possibility of becoming even shorter, when that bond is tested ‘til it breaks.

In Marnie Mitchell Lister’s short script Love Glow, Rick Turner is your typical easy going twenty-something guy who is focused on one typical thing: his dream girl. As far as he’s concerned, Laura’s the best of the best – and deserves nothing but the best in return. Expensive mansions, luxury cars, unlimited shopping sprees – the sky’s the limit, he thinks.

There’s just one problem…Rick is broke. Painfully so. There isn’t even a glimmer of available funds in his bank account, and Rick can feel his dream life fizzling out before it becomes reality.

So Rick does what any “sane” person would do: he checks himself into an experimental medical trial for a few weeks, one that promises to fund his new life. Success! Or so it seems.

Weeks later, Ricks completes the trial, collects his check, and enlists the help of best friend Matt to give him a ride back home. But there’s one thing he’s neglected – side effects.

Despite giving Matt a “glowing” review of his experience, Rick quickly finds his body going wrong. Coughing fits. Luminescent sweating spells. And that’s when Rick’s ears start to melt.

Will Rick turn into a radioactive pile of goo? Will his dream girl find his ever worsening body desirable? And will Matt ever be able to clean his car?

Love Glow isn’t your typical love story. Instead, it’s a hybrid of the best kind – balancing light humor with the universal theme of love, and a bit of over-the-top sci-fi flare. If you like your SF mixed with comedy, snag this one before it melts away!

Pages: 5

Budget: Mid-range. Yes, there’s a bit of FX involved. But it’s worth it for the festival raves (and laughs)!

About the reviewer: Karis Watie is a writer from Texas who got accidentally transplanted in New England. She is coping by eating dangerous amounts of doughnuts and closely studying television shows that she hopes to one day emulate as a screenwriter. She is pursuing a second bachelor’s degree while not on the couch, to help her dream along. If you want to talk television or drop Karis a spoiler or two, she’s at watiekaris@yahoo.com & @kn_watie on Twitter.

About the writer, Marnie Mitchell Lister: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at http://brainfluffs.com/. Marnie’s had multiple shorts produced and placed Semi-final with her features in BlueCat.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, July 15, 2016

Noob – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Noob
An alien-made artificial intelligence faces its greatest challenge: teaching a cantankerous, technology-averse 80-year old human how to work an iPhone.

Old people vs technology: it’s a perennial battle of the ages. And as technology gets more and more advanced, it ain’t gonna get easier any time soon!

Which doesn’t mean one can’t have multiple laughs at its expense…

That’s exactly what James Barron’s satirical Noob aims to do. Lead character Henry’s a grizzled war vet – the kind of guy who thinks physical prowess proves a man’s worth. So when his daughter buys him an iPhone, he struggles to understand the basics – and we mean really “basic”… like turning it on.

Frustrated by failure, the old man’s grief is multiplied when his wife suggests getting help from experts. But Henry’s determined to lone wolf this operation. At first, that doesn’t seem like such a bad idea – Henry calls the correct number for his queries. But then he accidentally changes the language to Spanish. Qué desastre!

Already confused, Henry’s utterly baffled when the weather suddenly changes and a large metallic craft appears. He’s being abducted! So it seems.

As it turns out, his abductor is a computer sent by a technologically advanced species to observe human behaviour for academic reasons – and poses no danger to Henry’s health.

But Henry poses a great threat to the computer…

…because he thinks it’s the Apple support system! And while he didn’t know how to work an iPhone, he certainly doesn’t understand the requests the AI makes – leading to a massive series of escalating communication breakdowns.

Threatening the poor bot’s circuit-sanity.

Hilariously ironic with a brilliant payoff, Noob is a clever commentary of the universal love-hate relationship we have with technology. It’s guaranteed to have everyone laughing – with or without the Genius Bar!

Pages: 11

Budget: Okay, there’s a bit of FX called for here. But nothing a touch of post or CGI can’t handle.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Newly discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow
A bad marriage can turn some people into monsters…

Ever wonder how the most famous couples in fiction made it work after happily ever after? Couples like Tarzan and Jane, Anna and Kristoff, or… Frankenstein and his bride? Well, it might not be as blissful as you’d imagine.

That’s just where we meet Frankenstein and his bride in Parts Are Such Sweet Sorrow: in marriage counseling, years after Mary Shelley’s story. Hey, even monsters have problems. He’s distant and literally emotionless, she’s tired of doing the same old things and just wants to go on a killer date (pun intended).

One thing they do agree on: they might be unhappy, but they’re not ready to be separated. “We were literally made for each other” Frankenstein pleads. So the marriage counselor dives in and a really monstrous couples therapy session begins.

As the truth comes out and secrets are revealed, the monster and his bride near a breakthrough… but it seems that every step forward leads to the couple taking two steps back. Will they make it? Not to spoil anything, but this story ends with a nice surprise… and this script is a bloody good time.

Pages: 8

Characters: 3 – Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, marriage counselor

Budget: Low to Mid. Really only two locations, three actors, but you may have to increase the makeup budget to make sure your Stein’s look appropriately gory. That being said, an experienced director with a great crew can make this one look hideous (in the best possible way!)

About the Reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the Writer, Dave Lambertson: I took up writing rather late in life having already been retired before I put pen to paper (okay – finger to computer key) for the first time. My favorite genres to read and write are dramedies and romantic comedies.

In addition to this short, I have written four features; “The Last Statesman” (a 2015 PAGE finalist and a Nicholl’s and BlueCat quarterfinalist), “The Beginning of The End and The End” (a PAGE Semi-Finalist). Taking Stock (a drama) and a new comedy – “Screw You Tube”. Want to learn more? Reach Dave at dlambertson “AT” hotmail! And visit his website at http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, July 11, 2016

Party Mom – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Party Mom
Being a Mom doesn’t mean you’re not cool.
…Or does it?

“I’m not a regular mom. I’m a cool mom,” purrs Amy Poehler’s Mrs. George in Mean Girls. This line comes right after she’s sufficiently stabbed Lindsey Lohan with her fake, extremely perky boobs and then told her teenage daughter (and friends) that there are no rules.

We’ve all known moms like that, right? A mom who still wants to be young, who can’t accept the age wrinkles written all over her face. You think that’s as bad as it gets?

Well, you’ve never met Party Mom.

Written by talented scribe David M Troop, Party Mom tells the story of one Mom’s quest to ensure that her daughter (Kayla) has the best tenth birthday possible at Chuck E. Cheese. Turns out, it’s a miracle the party is taking place there – due to various “mishaps”, Party Mom’s been banned from several local establishments; especially the “fun” and bouncy kind…

And this shin-dig is no exception. It doesn’t take long before all hell breaks loose and Party Mom is drunk, disheveled and dancing on Chuck E. Cheese himself.

That’s about when daughter Kayla snaps. She’s embarrassed of her mom (as any self respecting ten year old would be) and tired of her antics even more. Kayla demands her mom grow up and storms off to compose herself – leaving Party Mom to reflect on what she’s done.

What will Party Mom do? Will she stop drinking? Or agree to act her age?

Most importantly, will she ever be allowed in another Chuck E. Cheese? You’ll just have to read this script – and see!

Pages: 6

Characters: Party Mom, dad, daughter Kayla. Some extra kids and parents. Oh, and probably some security guards/Chuck E. Cheese staff.

Budget: Depends on what locations you select: anywhere from low, mid and high. An actual Chuck E. Cheese might cost a bit, although the setting could easily be shifted to a backyard if you have the right props. Regardless, a smart director could make this with friends and family for cheap and have a funny, touching meditation on what staying young really means.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus. Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced. Dave would like to make it three. Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, July 8, 2016

Grammar Nazi Killer – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Grammar Nazi Killer
Your next grammatical error may be your last.

Okay, I’ll admit it. My high school grammar skills might be a little rusty. I may end a sentence with the occasional preposition. And I have been known to allow my participles to dangle in public. But, hey, no one’s perfect.

There is one place, it seems, the world’s worst grammatical offenders gather in droves – the internet. More specifically, social media.

Let’s face it. Most of the people on Facebook are not playing with an unabridged dictionary.

Grammar Nazi Killer, the new short script by James Barron, introduces a new villain to the slasher horror genre. A psychopath who kills in the name of proper sentence structure. A murderer who butchers those who butcher the English language. A monster who trolls the internet searching for his next illiterate victim.

True to the genre, our protagonists are a group of high school teens whose only crimes are stupidity and the overwhelming desire to investigate loud noises and dark rooms. And, of course, committing a grammatical error or two on-line.

Our first victim is Dwight, a normal, every-day kid who loves to watch porn in his basement. In his defense, I’m sure he’s limited to an hour, and only if his homework is finished. Imagine his surprise when a message flashes on his screen and it’s not an ad for horny housewives.

“Your writing is an affront to Grammar and the English language. Prepare to die!”

Spoiler alert, Dwight! Zip it up and get the hell out of there!

Amber Swift, a beautiful, blonde airhead Skypes with her hunky quarterback boyfriend Jason when she receives the same message on her computer after making the fatal flaw of being too cutesy with her word usage. After Amber’s error is “corrected,” Grammar Nazi Killer sets his sights on Jason. Will Jason be the next victim of bad grammar? Or can he somehow escape with his subject and predicate intact?

Grammar Nazi Killer is a horror script with its tongue firmly in cheek. Until it’s chopped off. Directors who are fans of the slasher genre should definitely take a stab at this one. This script is bloody good all the way to the last cut.

Pages: 14

Budget: Moderate. Not a big cast, but lots of gory FX. If you happen to have a couple barrels of blood in your basement, you’re half way there.

About the Reviewer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, and this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

About the Author: Newly discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

True Myth – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

True Myth

When a secret military team gains the power of psychic foresight, their greatest challenge is what happens next.

There are two types of people in this world.  Those that stuff everyone into two categories, and those that don’t…

Wait a minute.  I meant, those that like corn-ball humor, and those that don’t.  There’s really no middle ground.  Either one LOVES movie like Airplane and Hot Shots Part Deux… or you absolutely can’t fathom why anyone would laugh at something as silly as a blow-up Pilot doll.

This script is custom made for people in that first category.

Set in the highly secret quarters of the Department of Urban Myth Banishment (D.U.M.B.), True Myth follows a suspenseful “day in the life” of this top secret team, ferreting out and quashing urban myths that rise to terrorize the unsuspecting civilian population.  Together, the professionals of DUMB (including Colonel Sooth Sayer, Private Moments and Private Fears) battle such evils as “The Unseen Chainsaw”, and “Embarrassing Foot Odor.”  The result?  Silly and puntastic…but perfect for directors who can quote Airplane (or Monty Python) by heart.

So give this one a shot.  Goofy humor like this never gets old.

About the writer: An award winning writer, Bill Sarre has had scripts place both finalist and quarter finalist with Page and Bluecat.  Another short of his, The Grieving Spell, was recently grand prize winner of the London Film Awards. Bill can be reached at Bill.sarre “AT” gmail.com

Pages: 11

Budget: Really midrange.  There’s a decent number of characters and locations here – and maybe a touch of FX required to make everything look high-tech and para-militaristic.  But nothing that couldn’t be handled with a touch of creativity.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Saved My Bacon – Short Script for Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Saved My Bacon

It’s 1913 and a big city reporter travels out to the country to meet The World’s Greatest Pig.

 There will always be a place in storytelling for rural tall tales. Big Fish did it quite successfully. And it’s easy to see why.  There’s something about combining the honest simplicity of “down-home rural folk” with fanciful humorous stories that simply works.   (And really beats Deliverance when it comes to telling country stories by the campfire…)

Saved My Bacon comes straight from that pedigree (Big Fish… not Deliverance.)  Featuring only two main protags, it follows the story of Milo the Reporter who’s come to interview Farmer Davis… a simple man with an extraordinary pig.  The result is pure Mark Twain – a sweet narrative, with a very effective ending.

Running only 5 pages long, this is a perfect script for anyone interested in telling a solid, amusing tale.  As long as you have access to Wilbur for the shoot…

About the writer: Tim Westland, co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, received first place for Balls Out in the NNYM 15 page contest. A moderator at Moviepoet, he’s an outstanding writer with an eye for the details. His IMDB page can be found here.

Pages: 5

Budget: The vast majority of this script is low budget.  Two protags, one room and a single rural exterior shot. The one – er – stumbling point is that you have to get a pig – and do a little FX for its legs.  But when you get that, this one’s golden!

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, July 4, 2016

Who Killed Rosa Maria Morales – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by The Merrows

Who Killed Rosa Maria Morales?

The man who knows the truth about a mysterious murder lies in an ambulance after a heart attack. Detective Sanchez needs to question him before it is too late.

If you’re old enough, you probably remember the phrase “Who Shot J.R.?” It was an American obsession during the summer of 1980, after the season finale of Dallas. An unknown assailant had shot the show’s conniving protagonist, J.R. Ewing. With eight months before the next episode, the entire nation was thrown into a tailspin…

Who Killed Rosa Maria Rosales channels the same sort of obsession. But this time it’s all focused on one man – gritty homicide Detective Sanchez. A heart attack victim lies prone on the floor, teetering on the precipice of death. As a frantic paramedic scrambles to resuscitate his patient, Detective Sanchez looms over the barely-conscious man – grilling him mercilessly.

You see, Rosa Maria Morales has been horribly murdered. And Detective Sanchez’s determined to find out who did the monstrous deed – before the secret’s taken to the grave.

As paddles shock and monitors beep, Detective Sanchez yells out a string of suspect names. The cheating lover? Rosa’s sister? The Taco Mogul? Sanchez mercilessly batters the stricken man with questions. This is one lawman not to be denied.

It’s down to the wire – with everything at stake. Will Detective Sanchez solve the case before his witness flat-lines? A better question perhaps might be… why does he want to know?

A sweet who-dunnit with a fun twist, the read for Rosa’s an absolute hoot. And perfect for mystery loving directors – tongue planted firmly in mid-cheek.

About the writer: Relatively new in screenwriting, Manolis Froudarakis has won two awards in short screenplay competitions. His main focus is comedy – preferably, comedy with a little edge. You can contact him at: mfroudarakis@yahoo.gr

Pages: 5

Budget: Low (once you get your hands on some ambulance stock footage, and miscellaneous EMS equipment)

About the reviewer: Scott Merrow co-writes screenplays with his wife Paula. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy… the whole nine yards. Wanna give them a shout out? They’re available at scott-paula “AT” comcast.net

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, July 1, 2016

Chef Musto – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Guest Reviewer

Chef Musto
What’s for dinner? That’s always the question when guests arrive…

Dinner parties: a chance to impress friends in more ways than one. While the overall vibe of the occasion is important, it’s the food that will be most remembered by patrons when all’s said and down – especially if a speciality dish is served…

In Steve Clark’s Chef Musto, the kitchen is just one of many rooms contained within an eloquent British mansion. This lavishness is particularly flaunted in the dining room, where a grand table is prepared to welcome soon-to-be-arriving dinner guests.

Unfortunately, the kitchen staff are anything but prepared. The Sous Chef is late, and exasperated Musto blames diminutive butler Radford for the mess. Musto’s assistant Hispanic Mi-Mi speaks no English, and stays out of the argument as it threatens to boil over the top. Steam is avoided when missing maestro Chris finally turns up, at the precise time he was instructed to arrive.

Fortunately, the wait proves worth it. If Chris was a soldier, he’d be covered in medals. Though new to the gig, his culinary experience shines through as the team speed their way through preparing the main dish’s sides.

And soon after Radford turns up the heat:

RADFORD
The Davenport’s phoned.
Estimated time of arrival in five minutes.

While Davenport is only the party host, Musto knows all-too-well they’re behind schedule. As is common in Kitchen Nightmares, some shortcuts must inevitably be taken for the main course. Some rookie mistakes will surely be made – ones that lead to the hosts seeing the entrée before it should be unveiled…

Take a pinch of flavorsome dialogue, a drop of juicy plot twist, and sprinkle some spicy characters on top. Whip that all together ‘til it foams, and you’ve got a concoction of comedic incongruence called Chef Musto: Bon Appetite!

Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned director, this culinary classic is sure to have guests heaping praise upon the chef. So cook this tantalizing script until it’s well done, and your audience will be demanding seconds – we guarantee!

Pages: 8

Budget: Pretty low: give this just a little green, you’ll be cooking fine!

About the writer: Based in upstate, NY, Steven Clark is the writer of over 30 short scripts, several of which are under option, in pre-production, or have already been made into films. On A Clear Night, a family Christmas feature aimed at a Hallmark Channel-type audience, is currently in the works. Steven can be reached at Steamroller138 (a) gmail.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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