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Friday, September 16, 2016

Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secure – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by simplyscriptshorts

Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secure
A man discovers his fears could be a blessing when a night cab ride goes horribly wrong.

For many metropolitan workers, their daily commute is damned from the moment they walk out the door.

Overcrowded buses and delayed subway trains are daily demons one can’t escape. Mundane monsters which delight in tormenting travelers – making their day Hell from the start.

But getting a comfortable taxi ride isn’t all that bad – right?

Not if you’re Gareth, the protagonist in Anthony Cawood’s “Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secured.” Upper-middle class and entitled, Gareth’s arrogant – in some ways. But it just takes a small red light to extinguish all that confidence in a puff of smoke.

You see, Gareth suffers from Cleithrophobia – the fear of being locked in. And when his cab starts rolling, the doors lock. A red light indicates the doors are secured, and Gareth’s phobia kicks in – fast.

Cruising along dark streets, Gareth’s cab starts and stops at every traffic light, lengthening the trip and causing yet more concern. And Gareth’s anxieties certainly aren’t helped by unexpected hazards – like idiots who try to reach into the moving car. Or stand clueless in the road.

There’s something not quite right about these “idiots”. Maybe they’re all drunk and celebrating. Or perhaps it’s something more. A danger that’ll make Gareth feel relieved that he’s locked in.

Unless things get even worse…

Pages: 8

Budget: Moderate. Just rent a cab for the day. And a few extras as well….!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Black SUV – Short Script Review - posted by simplyscriptshorts

Black SUV
A secret service agent is forced to question her morality when she realizes the mysterious man she’s assigned to protect is pure evil.

“Many lick before they bite.”

Such is the epigraph of the gritty and quirky Black SUV, written by CJ Walley.

And if that quote doesn’t sound mysterious to you, you’ve gotta check out the script itself. Not to mention, check to see what’s up with you!

Going by the name of (surprise!) Mr. Black, we’re introduced to the titular character very much enjoying himself in the boot of his shadowy vehicle; parked not-so-innocently in the club district of New Orleans.

Dressed like a VIP and loving life at 50, the man’s got a few “errands” to run before the evening’s pleasures end.

However, he’s not gonna be driving this night.

No, Mr. Black has his own chauffeur and bodyguard, Eris. As sharply dressed as her enigmatic passenger, it’s Eris’ first time behind Black’s wheel.

As you’d expect a good boss to do, Mr. Black quickly segueways from professional instruction to a candid conversation with his new employee. Almost too candid, in fact.

And as Mr. Black engages in bizarre encounters with local down-and-outs, it becomes ever clearer that he doesn’t really need a bodyguard. At all.

Even so, Eris is constantly aware of her duties: “obedience and vigilance”, above all else.

Her willingness to fulfill those duties will be tested to the limits as she shuttles Mr. Black to his final errand; before their confusing night comes to a close…

With an unresolved cliffhanger and one of the most unforgettable pairs of characters you’ll likely ever see in a short, Black SUV takes an initially familiar story – and twists it into a gripping, original, one-of-a-kind premise.

It’s your duty to read this brilliant script. Like Eris soon discovers, it’s usually best to “do one’s job.”

Pages: 9

Budget: Reasonable. Rent an SUV, some believable actors and you’re set.

About the Reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer, C.J. Walley: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write new specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producers, directors, and actors in LA, NYC, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington DC, Zurich, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Dallas while occasionally blogging for Stage 32. If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Monday, August 15, 2016

Eddie Whorl – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Eddie Whorl
An older trucker was just looking for some company on a long haul between Pittsburgh and New York City. After this ride, he won’t be picking up any more hitchhikers.

How many of us haven’t fantasized about packing in our stress-filled lives in office cubicles and hitting the road? We find ourselves imagining a different life, perhaps even a life as a trucker. Wouldn’t that be grand? To see the country, blast oldies on the radio for hours, munch on junk food, and pass the time picking up interesting people and conversation along the way?

If that appeals to you… think again.

Matt, the protagonist of Rob Barkan’s Eddie Whorl, will tell a tale that will dispel any lingering illusions about the joys of life on the road. Matt’s getting old, and tired. Even worse: he’s begun to realize that most of the money he makes goes right back into repairs and maintenance for the vehicle that keeps him employed. And, those interesting folks you meet along the way?

Well, that’s where Matt’s story begins.

Matt had felt sorry for the hitchhiker: he seemed so old and alone. A traveling tramp so short and frail, he could barely climb into the cab. And he seemed to have been out in the middle of nowhere for quite some time. To the point that the trucker imagined his new companion little more than an extension of the leaves and twigs that matted his clothes and hair.

Nor was the hitcher going to be good company. He barely spoke. And became easily confused by any reference to life beyond his own – which consisted primarily of waking up in places he’d never been before. When Matt does finally get the hitchhiker to break his silence, the old man gives him his name. “Eddie Whorl”, he wheezes, a horrible stench wafting from his mouth.

Matt’s compassion quickly turns to terror when he realizes his travel companion isn’t as harmless as he seems. Even if Matt escapes the horror that comes next, other monstrosities like Eddie Whorl may well be lurking on highways across the country – just down the endless road.

If you delight in stories well told, and chillingly twisted endings, you won’t want to pass up Barkan’s Eddie Whorl. This is one horror you should pick up, and not pass by.

Number of pages: 12

Budget: Moderate.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing. She may be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: A writer from the tender age of seven, Rob Barkan has had already seen publication with several of his prose horror and fantasy tales. Like Whorl and want to find out more? Email him at robbybarkan “AT” yahoo!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, July 29, 2016

Checkmate – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Checkmate
Two couples, two kids and a winter lodge. It’s family game night – who’s ready to play?

Sometimes games bring out the worst in people. What may begin as a friendly competition devolves into arguments over whether or not a ball was out-of-bounds, a certain move is allowed, or if a word can be found in the dictionary. In the worst cases, game-time disputes extend beyond the playing field or board, bleeding into everyday life and poisoning the competitors’ friendship—sometimes forever.

Take the folks in J.E. Clarke’s latest script, Checkmate, for example. Two couples, along with their adorable six-year olds are holed up in a toasty lodge while a winter storm rages outside. The six-year olds are sprawled out on the floor, thoroughly engaged in a game of Operation. The occasional buzzing of surgical errors and children bantering intermittently interrupts the more serious and contentious adult conversations taking place over wine and two chessboards at a nearby table. At one chessboard, the men.

At the other, the women.

Sally and George Callister are each respectively losing what they thought was their obvious advantage. Conceitedly trusting that she possesses superior intellectual skills to her opponent that would allow her to clinch this chess match, Sally becomes increasingly distressed and rude as Rhonda begins to show signs of winning.

Rhonda captures Sally’s bishop! Sally snags her wine glass, GULPS the liquid down.

SALLY
Damn, you’re good. Better than expected.

RHONDA
You thought you’d automatically win? Because you went to college… and I didn’t?

SALLY
I dunno. Maybe.

Sally glares at Rhonda.

SALLY
Fine – you’ve got more experience. You should’ve mentioned that before we decided on a game.

RHONDA
And take away the home team advantage? It’s not like I wanted to play.

As the games progress, it becomes increasingly apparent that perhaps none of the competitors really wants to play. But, the games are of vital importance. And, losing is NOT an option.

If you’re looking for a masterful piece that probes friendship in an unnerving fashion all the way to the endgame…it’s your move.

Number of pages: 8

Budget: Low. Scenes shot in a woods on a winter day, and an interior that resembles the inside of a cabin.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing. She may be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has placed QF and SF for feature lengths in Page, and has two feature length films optioned for 2016/2017: limited location horror “Containment.” and SF feature “Stream of Consciousness.” Her sociopolitical zombie short “Cured” has been recently produced by talented director Adam Zuehlke of Zenoscope Productions, and she currently has 20+ features and 60+ shorts available in her roster. Samples of that work can be read at www.philclarkejr.com/jec.html. Ms. Clarke can be reached directly at janetgoodman “at” yahoo.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, May 16, 2016

Don’t Go in the Bathroom – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Don’t Go in the Bathroom
A young woman endures horrific violence; danger yet lingers in the bathroom.

Bathrooms can be scary places. Sharing one often demands more intimacy than sharing a bed.

And how many of us can honestly say they didn’t have to check behind the shower curtain for years after Psycho traumatized them to shreds?

Following the release of Hitchcock’s masterpiece, a number of films have indulged in restroom unrest—from suicides and murders in movies such as Fatal Attraction, to other forms of loo nastiness in films like The Conversation and Trainspotting as well. Even the poor protagonist of Finding Nemo experiences an ordeal of Toilet Hell.

Michael Cornetto’s Don’t Go in the Bathroom takes such terrors to a whole new level.

Protagonist Anne has survived a brutal beating and rape. And it’s in her very bathroom that the violence comes to a sticky end. Traumatized to her core, Anne cannot muster the courage to return “to the normal world”. Instead, she isolates herself in her apartment for days on end – going to extraordinary and disturbing extremes to avoid using her toilet at all.

Margaret – her well-meaning, yet irritatingly persistent caseworker – is sure she can overcome Anne’s neurotic fears. But Margaret is missing some key information. One wrong move on her part and she could wind up making things a whole lot worse; for both of them.

The result: an extreme dose of violence, blood, urine and feces – all of which provide a sublime source of irony. A disgusting one, of course.

So, if you’re a director looking for a script that rips through the envelope of gut-wrenching detail… up towards emotional/psychological heights, you will not want to miss Don’t Go in the Bathroom.

So print up a copy, and bring it in for a read. Everyone’s got to go… sometime.

Pages: 10

Budget: Low.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing. She may be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: Michael is a graduate of the New York School of Television Arts and has been screenwriting since 2005. A number of his short scripts have been produced and several have played the festival circuit… with over 70,000 views on Youtube. Drop Michael an email at mcornetto “AT” hotmail!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Conference Call – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Conference Call

Jeremy’s management team had better resolve the problem fast – before it resolves them.

Zombies are everywhere. They’re eating our favorite characters on TV, dragging themselves across the pages of novels and comic books. In movies, they’re no longer just relegated to anonymous background performers, but are portrayed by known – and sought after – actors (see Warm Bodies and Life After Beth). In this raging media apocalypse, the biggest problem facing writers is doing something fresh and new with the genre – while still adhering to the tropes that zombie audiences know, cherish and (rottingly) love.

Starting innocently, Conference Call opens with an introduction to five staff members, attending a video conference. Office babble ensues, along with various departmental conflicts. Just another “work meeting” comedy. Right?

Until one of the employees has her brains eaten by the living dead.

One by one, each co-worker is attacked by zombies – in various gory, disgusting ways. As their colleagues become undead lunch, the remaining attendees remain unphased – focused on business at hand. Buzzwords fly as the survivors argue over the solution to their crisis… Should sharks be shipped in? Perhaps snakes? Or should they consult legal?

For anyone who’s ever suffered in an office environment, the absurdity of the situation is all too real. In corporate America, you either contribute to the team, or you’re dead. Through it’s 5 breezy pages, Conference Call takes that concept to a logical, humorous extreme.

Are you a director looking to make a zombie film – yet fear the inevitable cliches? Then grab Conference Call before it’s gone… a “biting satire” on corporate culture – and a loving homage to the genre.

About the writer: Pete Barry is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright, actor, director and musician. His short plays have been published in numerous collections. He’s also a cofounder of the Porch Room, a film and theater production company, website available at http://www.porchroom.com/.  Please feel free to reach out to him with script requests at petebarry27 “AT” Hotmail.

More of Barry’s reviewed shorts are available at the following STS links:

Restraint (also zombie related)

Cheater (drama)

Page Count: 5

Budget: Low to medium. There are five speaking parts, but the budgetary focus is on the numerous zombies. How much a filmmaker ends up spending ultimately depends on how all-out s/he goes with the zombie makeup and gore effects.

About the reviewer: Zach Jansen is an award-winning and produced screenwriter from Saint Paul, Minnesota.  He enjoys spending time with his kids, anything movies, and sitting at his desk pounding out his next script.  If for some reason you want to learn more about him, you can check out his IMDb page or quasi-frequently updated blog.

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Thursday, November 26, 2015

No BullScript Consulting – Danny Manus Script Review (Red Light) - posted by wonkavite

Recently, we reviewed Chris Shamburger’s horrific new slasher, Red Light. As readers of Shootin’ the Shorts are aware, our goal at STS is to find new and promising writers, and provide them with the platform they need to get their work seen (then hopefully optioned, and produced!)

One of our not-so-secret weapons in this quest is Danny Manus of No BullScript Consulting. Having worked as a development executive in Hollywood, Danny is an in-demand script consultant, named by Creative Screenwriting Magazine at one of the “Top 15” consultants in their “Cream of the Crop” list.   Partnered with STS, Danny provides wonderfully detailed and helpful notes for the monthly STS feature script.  This coverage is provided free to the writer, and can be posted our site or kept confidential – at the writer’s discretion. But wait – there’s more!  Any script that gets a coveted “recommend” from tough but eminently fair Danny will be featured in his monthly newsletter and may also receive further exposure to his production contacts…

Below – for your Thanksgiving-reading pleasure – please find Danny’s scoresheet for Red Light. (Please note: for this posting, we’ve broken with tradition and redacted the actual coverage notes.) TRUST US: Danny’s notes – as always – were insightful and detailed; an invaluable read.  But we’re allergic to spoilers here at STS. So we’re keeping THAT under our Turkey table today!

But a Strong Consider from No Bullscript?  You better damned well grab this gem while you can! 🙂 Contact writer Chris at cshamburger “AT” live dot com for a copy of the script!

**To submit a script, please visit STS at the page listed HERE. Danny can also be contacted directly via the No BullScript Consulting website at http://www.nobullscript.net/contact/. Or on Twitter @DannyManus.

No-Bullscript-Web-Banner-160x85-Final

NO BULLSCRIPT ANALYSIS

 Title: Red Light

Type of Material: Screenplay

Author:  Chris Shamburger

Number of Pages: 102

Circa:  Present

Location:  Arizona

Genre:  Slasher/Horror

Coverage Date:   11/19/15

Budget Range: Low

LOGLINE: When three teens challenge a local ghost story by running a red light, they find themselves the next targets of a seemingly supernatural entity bent on revenge but the truth behind the legend may be even more deadly.

NO BULLSCRIPT 20 POINT GRADING SHEET AND RECOMMENDATION:

PROJECT: STRONG CONSIDER 

Elements Excellent Solid Needs Work Poor
Concept/

Premise

  X    
Story   X    
Structure   X    
Conflict/Drama   X    
Consistent Tone X      
Pacing   X    
Stakes   X    
Climax   X    
Resolution/

Ending

  X    
Overall Characters   X    
Protagonist   X    
Antagonist     X  
Dialogue   X    
Transitions   X    
Format, Spelling, Grammar, Pg Count   X    
Well Defined Theme   X    
Commercial Appeal/Hook   X    
Overall Originality   X    
Production Value X      
International Appeal   X    

About the writer: Chris Shamburger was a finalist (Top 10) in the 2013 Shriekfest Film Festival for his recently-produced script, Hiccups. He has been a semi-finalist twice and has also been published in Twisted Dreams Magazineand Horror in Words. Chris lives in Marietta, GA with his partner and their Chow-mix rescue, Walter. Aside from writing, Chris has been teaching pre-kindergarten for the past six years. You can find him on IMDb here: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6420891/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

Friday, November 13, 2015

The Riding Hoods’ Creed – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Don

The Riding Hoods’ Creed

Lonnie was just supposed to take her back to Grandma’s House.

But, something overcame him along the way.

Fairy-tales: don’t you just love them to Death? Especially the original work by The Brothers Grimm. Now there’s a compendium of bloody, gruesome, sexual stuff: the ultimate Fantasy Nightmare. And when fairy tales get blended with other cultural icons – in an organic, gritty manner…? Then screw Jason and Michael Meyers. The result here’s more… magical, to say the least!

Take the story of Little Red Riding Hood, for instance. “Little Red” just wants to make it safely to Grandma’s house. While she wanders through the forest, a wolf stealthily plots her demise. Big eyes, big teeth, big appetite. Then along comes The Hunter, and everyone lives happily ever after…except for the wolf, that is.

Pia Cook’s latest work, The Riding Hoods’ Creed, teases the audience with twists it takes along this well loved (and travelled) story line. Which makes perfect sense when you think it over. A winding path through the woods? Who could ever take the straight-away?

In this version of the age-old fairy tale, teenage Gwen wanders off from Grandma’s trailer park into a bar. The patrons of this grungy dive? A dreaded biker gang, The Riding Hoods. Dressed in a short black leather skirt and “an even shorter and tighter red top”, Gwen is out for adventure. Yet, despite their grizzled appearance, the men in the bar worry that this young woman spells trouble. Not for herself… for them. About to launch a regular tradition, the bikers need Gwen gone. ASAP.

Gang member Lonnie is quickly appointed to make sure the young woman gets pushed out the door, and escorted home to Grandma safe. Gwen protests, but Harry ominously warns:

Trust me, tonight ain’t the night little girls wanna be out walking

by themselves.

(to Lonnie)

No time to fuck around, Lonnie. Take her home to grandma,

then get back here before eleven.

The two take off on Lonnie’s motorcycle (aka “metal steed”). Lon picks a shortcut through the woods, designed to get him home in time to join his men.

That’s doing the right thing, isn’t it? But in the woods, things always lose control. To the extent that Lonnie (and Gwen’s) in a mess of trouble. ‘Cause even biker gangs have strict rules. And Lonnie’s broken Rule Number One.

Why was the gang so eager to get a luscious piece like Gwen out of the way? And, what exactly is Rule Number One? Don’t miss the chance to find out. Make sure you have really big eyes and a huge appetite – because you’re in for a delicious surprise!

Pages: 11

Budget: Moderate. Will need a motorcycle, a bar scene, a wooded area, and a short black leather skirt. Okay – in other words, this is one shoot that’ll be real fun! And the classic 50s rock and role soundtrack for this could be… amazing, don’t you think?

About the writer: Born and raised in Sweden, Pia Cook has four produced features, a fifth one in pre-pro, and twenty five shorts to her name (full IMDB credits here.) She started writing screenplays in 2006 and has written seventy short screenplays and ten features. (Yeah… that’s not a typo. Seven ZERO.) She can be reached at gatortales “AT” gmail!

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She has always loved to write, but only recently has begun to work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Heart of Coal – Short Script Available for Production - posted by wonkavite

Heart of Coal

A renowned female psychologist ruminates over serial killer personalities – and the horror they’ve wreaked on her  life…

Narration. Voice-over. For some, it’s a film gimmick that grates on the nerves. But when done right, it can be spectacular. Don’t believe us? Try on a few of these films on for size.

Annie Hall: stand-up comedian Alvy Singer recounts his neurotic, titular love affair. Goodfellas: Henry Hill describes his evolution from small time crook to valued Mobster, and fall from grace to Informant. The Usual Suspects: Roger “Verbal” Kint weaves a tale of five random members from a police line-up, and the evil Keyser Soze. Speaking of Kevin Spacey and voiceovers, what about American Beauty?

All classic films told through the eyes of the narrator. And that’s the power of “V.O”. In the hands of a skilled screen writer, the voice of the narrator can lift a film to new heights. Add complex dimension to a story, and set the proper tone from page One… whether it be comedic, dramatic, or – in the case of Heart of Coal – downright chilling.

Dr. Lianne Berg’s life has had its ups and downs. A child psychologist who works with autistic children, she’s successful, young and gorgeous. A woman driven to succeed by horrors in her own childhood. Only nine when her mother was killed in front of her – stabbed to death sixty-seven times and beheaded. The serial killer never captured. Not surprisingly, the working of such dysfunctional minds became Dr. Berg’s obsession. As the script progresses, her voice drives the narrative; providing a glimpse into her separate worlds. Professional insights on the motives of such monsters, and her own nightmarish memories: how they’ve warped and shaped her life…

Stylishly written and streamlined, Heart of Coal is a deliciously demented script. And an amazing showcase for a thirtyish actress with just the right voice. With the right cast and smart editing, this script is an amazing find. Do this one right, and create a true horror masterpiece!

About the writer: Born and raised in Sweden, Pia Cook has SEVERAL produced features and shorts to her name (full IMDB credits here.) She started writing screenplays in 2006 and has written over sixty short screenplays and ten features. (Yeah… that’s not a typo. Six ZERO.)

Budget: Moderate. There are some locations inside a hospital and a Senator’s office. And a few extras to hire. Not to mention some blood and horror FX. But nothing to lose your head over. (Talk about an unfortunate choice of words!)

About the reviewer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie. He can be reached at dtroop506 “AT” gmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR VIEW OTHER SCRIPTS AT THE STS BLOG HERE

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

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