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Saturday, December 31, 2016

Thank You and Happy New Year - posted by Don

Thank you to everyone. Particular thanks to those who have taken new folks under his/her wing and mentored new writers. I’ve been delighted to see a number of folks whose initial works were panned go back and re-work and a year later work is being optioned and produced.

Many thanks to Bert and Pia who continue to moderate the discussion board. Without their participation there would literally be no discussion board.

Thank you all for making the community what it is. Best wishes, much love and good things.

– Don

Friday, December 30, 2016

Christmas Spirit by Richard Russell – Filmed! - posted by Don

Christmas Spirit (6 page short drama in pdf format) by Richard Russell

Filmed by Kurtis Watson

A belated offering for Christmas. A young man bent on crime listens to Charles Dickens.

Discuss on the Discussion Board

Thursday, December 29, 2016

Alba – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by The Merrows

Alba (5 pages in pdf foramt) by Robert G. Newcomer

Art…or abomination?

Alba, a short little screenplay, is a touching story of Science. Art. And a touch of magic.

On top of that, it’s mostly true…

Alba is a glowing bunny. Literally. Alba’s DNA has been spliced with phosphorescent jellyfish – giving her a greenish glow. (Especially when bathed in black light.) A case of science gone mad, you say? More like an art experiment – assisted by genetist “Ivan”. Unveiled to the world by artist “Dimitri” at the turn of the 21st century, Alba’s green glow was broadcast everywhere.

Needless say, not all were pleased. Angry demonstrations ensued, protesting the reduction of the “genome to a playground.” During the ensuring maelstrom of press, Ivan was almost fired. And Alba’s exhibit was cancelled – the bunny removed from her emerald spotlight.

As time passed, the headlines died away. Eventually Alba passed, as well. Over time, memory of the experiment faded – remembered only by a select few. Ivan. And his young daughter, Meghan. Too young to contemplate the greater issues, Meghan experienced Alba through innocent eyes – as the gentle (and glowing) creature she was.

Now grown, Meghan now tells the tale to her daughter, 7 year old Kelly. Giving it her own whimsical spin, Meghan tells Kelly of the sweet bunny… misunderstood by the entire world. Fortunately, there’s a secret grandpa’s been keeping. And a happy ending to Alba’s “tail”…

The truth is often stranger than fiction. In an industry where “dark and twisted” rules supreme, Alba is a stand out short. A touch of SF and fantasy – mixed with a huge helping of whimsy. A director can never go wrong with that!!

Budget: Low – medium. A few actors, minimal settings. Some glowing-bunny FX required!

About the writer: Robert Newcomer recently received his first IMDB credit for another short, Them That’s Dead. An intelligent writer, he has several other shorts and a horror feature length available for consideration. Bert’s IMDB credits are listed here.

About the reviewers: Scott & Paula Merrow are a husband and wife screenwriting team. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy – the whole nine yards. They’re reachable at scott-paula (a) comcast.net.

Read Alba (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Tattooji by Anthony Cawood – Filmed - posted by Don

Tattooji (pdf format) by Anthony Cawood

Filmed by Vintage Production

Tempers quickly fray when an inconsiderate boyfriend wastes their money on yet another useless gadget and she takes issue with his childish spending. (Short, Drama)

Discuss this script on the Discussion Board

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

The Grieving Spell – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by The Merrows

The Grieving Spell (13 pages in pdf format) by Bill Sarre

A grieving man uses a special magic to relieve the pain he feels following the death of his wife.

It’s a paradox – so many really good stories revolve around a character’s bad decisions. This is definitely one of them.

Written by screenwriter Bill Sarre, The Grieving Spell tells the eerie tale of a man’s crumbling emotions after the loss of his wife Helen in a car crash… and his relentless quest to find relief from the pain chipping away at his psyche. So he makes a bad decision.

He turns to witchcraft.

Inspired by his departed wife’s interest in Wicca, Lawrence pays a visit to Astrid Dove – the High Priestess of the New Dawn Centre. “I need your magic to take the pain away – allow me to heal on the inside,” he tells her. Though he swears he’s not looking for an easy fix, Astrid has reservations. “I’m not sure this is the right approach for you.”

Talk about an understatement.

The bereaved widower persists: he desperately needs to move on. But what Astrid doesn’t know is that there’s more to Lawrence’s emotional crisis than loss and grief. There’s jealousy. And rage. And more than a touch of guilt.

A reluctant Astrid gives him a “grieving spell”, to be performed around a large fire. The priestess counsels as she writes it down: “Magic’s a subtle art. It’s not easy to predict.”

Understatement (and bad decision) part two.

As Lawrence performs the spell on a beach one starry night, a hazy figure emerges from the embers. Lawrence’s bad decisions have come back to haunt him. And finally set things right…

The Grand Prize Winner of the London Film Awards, The Grieving Spell is classic Monkey’s Paw horror. Watch out what you wish for… unless it’s a script like this, of course!

Budget: A few locations (car, beach, diner and office.) Four main characters… and some minor FX that can easily be done in post.

About the writer: An award winning writer, Bill Sarre has had scripts place both finalist and quarter finalist with Page and Bluecat. Bill can be reached at Bill.sarre (a) gmail

About the reviewers: Scott & Paula Merrow are a husband and wife screenwriting team. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy – the whole nine yards. They’re reachable at scott-paula (a) comcast.net

Read The Grieving Spell (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, December 26, 2016

Evil Karma by Warren Duncan filmed! - posted by Don

Evil Karma (6 page horror in pdf format by Warren Duncan

An evil man pays for the sins of his past.

Discuss this script on the Discussion Board

Friday, December 23, 2016

The Gifted Photographer – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by LC

The Gifted Photographer (pdf format) Ian J. Courter

A photographer pays a house-call to shoot a family portrait where his true talent becomes apparent.

Photographs, those treasured mementos of our lives – they can chart a life from birth through to adulthood, and beyond. We keep photos in our wallets, in lockets around our necks, in photo-frames by our bedside tables. Photographs allow us to freeze moments – to travel back in time.

The Gifted Photographer is set towards the end of the Victorian era. At first glance it conjures Great Britain, but America had its own Gilded Age, most notably in the regions of New England and the Deep South. Think Gothic Architecture, the Women’s Suffragette Movement, Republican domination, and literary greats such as Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain. This was also a period characterized by high society and strict morality.

Ian J. Courter manages beautifully to evoke the images of the time – the cobblestone streets, horse drawn carriages and top-hats.

Photography at this time was in its infancy – there was no such thing as the ‘Selfie’ and no such thing as Instagram or Snapchat. The taking of photographs, in particular portraits, was only ever done for special occasions.

The story opens on Michael Houtman, the titular photographer of the piece. Herbert and Margaret Jaffe have requested his services for a very special family portrait with their daughter, Linda. Michael strikes up a conversation with Linda and discovers this sweet young woman suffered a nasty spill on the ice a few months ago. The accident has left her sickly and confined to a wheelchair, but this morning she wakes to a perfect Spring day feeling better than she has in a long time – and she’s ready for her close-up.

But this is no ordinary day, no ordinary photo-shoot, and no ordinary photographer…

Far be it for me to shed too much light, or bring into focus the darker themes and rich cultural history explored in The Gifted Photographer, suffice to say the Latin phrases Ars moriendi and Memento mori both give clues into a not so well known practice explored in this unique tale.

Of course, all you have to do to find out more is read the script. You’ll not only discover the secret talent The Gifted Photographer possesses, but will also uncover the talent of writer Ian J. Courter.  

With an ending that will stay with you long after the lights come up (we recommend reading it at night) and a final sting in the tail you won’t see coming, we advise you to get The Gifted Photographer in the can quick as a flash, before somebody else snaps it up.

Pages: 8

Budget: A little will be needed to make this one period.  But given what you get in the return, it’s definitely worth it!

About the writer: Ian J. Courter has an academic and technical-writing background, and is published in both fields, so a shift to another form of writing seemed natural. He strives to combine his writing skills with nearly two decades of military experience to develop screenplays with vivid locations and in-depth, realistic characters. What started as a hobby quickly became a passion.  In only a few short years, he has written three feature-length screenplays and nine short scripts.  He currently has several feature-length scripts in various stages of development and continually seeks inspiration for more. His email address is ian.j.courter “at” gmail.com.

About the reviewer: L. Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.

Read The Gifted Photographer (pdf format)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Fangs – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

Fangs (pdf format) by Jean-Pierre Chapoteau

A vampire offers his services to a slave for the exchange of food.

Adversaries. They’re the essential ingredient for conflict. Protagonist vs. Antagonist: equally strong and well defined. To create a compelling tale, one needs that Yin and Yang. Characters that need something from each other. Unwilling to stop until that urge is satisfied…

It’s a lust that works, every time. Especially in Jean-Pierre Chapoteau’s short script, Fangs.

As the story opens, slave fieldworker Mogey heads to a dark and dismal storm cellar. There he encounters Aldazo – an ancient vampire in extreme distress. Having lost his way while hunting at night, Aldazo’s been separated from his “minions”. With daylight beckoning, the creature’s taken shelter in the cellar. Vulnerable, and mortally weak from hunger, Aldazo’s in a terrible bind. He offers the human a deal he can’t refuse: bring him some needed “prey” – and Aldazo will grant Mogey his greatest wish.

At first, the skeptical slave resists. Why negotiate with a “rank, deadin’ bloodsucker.” Especially a creature as shifty and evil as Aldazo seems?

But Aldazo insists. Wielding a wiley persistence honed throughout the centuries, the vampire hammers out an agreement. Mogey will fetch Aldazo a young slave girl to feed on. In return, the vampire will call in a few favors. From creatures even more old and powerful than he.

Mogey takes down names and leaves, setting out to fulfill his end of the deal. But can the vampire be trusted? And are Mogey and Aldazo being kept in the dark… in far more ways than one? The two are headed for deadly conflict. From which only one can emerge victorious….

More than than your run-of-the-mill vampire tale, Fangs is filled with rich history and dialogue. It’s a smart story, awaiting a smart director. And so we ask: are you the chosen one?

Pages: 5

Budget: Manageable. Stairs and a basement could represent a cellar. Both the male protagonist and male antagonist are distinctive and deserve special attention. We’ll leave it up to the director to reveal which is which. 🙂

About the Writer: Jean-Pierre Chapoteau started writing feature-length scripts in 2005, then focused on shorts in 2009. Since then he’s had three scripts produced and two more optioned. He has won several awards for his shorts. Jean-Pierre was a finalist in the RAW TALENT Competition for his faith-based feature-length script: ‘Far From Perfect.’ And was also a semi-finalist in the SLAMDANCE teleplay competition and a finalist in the OBSWRITER teleplay contest for his adapted teleplay, Curb Your Enthusiasm: The Guardian. You can contact Jean-Pierre Chapoteau at: Jeanpierre_4_25 (a) msn(dot) com

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature.

Read Fangs

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Silence screenplay for your consideration - posted by Don

Paramount comes out with Silence for your consideration

Silence – May 7, 2015 final shooting script by Jay Cocks & Martin Scorsese – hosted by: Paramount – in pdf format

The story of two Catholic missionaries who face the ultimate test of faith when they travel to Japan in search of their missing mentor – at a time when Catholicism was outlawed and their presence forbidden.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

Check out more Scripts Studios are Posting for 2016 – 2017 Script Award Consideration

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