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Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Silence, Eventually – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by Guest Reviewer

Silence, Eventually
Two young men suffer an eventful first date at a night club, but that’s neither the beginning, or the end, of their personal struggles.

On June 12th, 2016, 49 people – mostly young gay men – were killed in a mass shooting at Orlando nightclub Pulse. 53 more were wounded. And countless lives traumatized.

The deadliest mass shooting by a single attacker in the history of the United States, Orlando symbolized even more – an act of pure hatred against a community built on freedom of expression and love.

You know what they say about “silver linings”. In the face of such tragedy, such clichés may ring trite, but still true.

Because through all the pain and sorrow of that day came a tidal wave of solidarity for LGBT pride that no madman’s bullet could stop.

Steven Clark’s Silence, Eventually turns this horrific tragedy on its head, using it effectively and gently tell a tale of innocent souls who suffer persecution – for the “crime” of who they are.

Beginning in a back alleyway, we’re introduced to two young survivors – Sam and Kyle. While both are physically intact, Kyle’s shirt is soaked in blood.

Needless to say, he just wants to go home. Which is the safest place to be, right?

Wrong. Kyle hasn’t come out to his parents yet. And they definitely don’t know he’s been on a date with Sam to the club.

Traumatized, but determined to “keep moving”, Sam and Kyle walk together along a suburban sidewalk – the sun preparing its entrance on a brand new day.

And Kyle admits to worries about his “secret” being discovered:

KYLE
My parents are old school proud. If I came out…

The rest is easily implied.

Fortunately, Sam offers to help Kyle clean up before returning home, and cheer him up a little – if he can.

But does survival always ensure a happy ending? Will Kyle’s family discover his recent whereabouts and still accept him with open, relieved arms?

Pages: 11

Budget: Minor – two main characters, and easy settings. (Easy to find – but emotionally difficult to shoot.)

About the writer: Based in upstate, NY, Steven Clark is the writer of over 30 short scripts, several of which are under option, in pre-production, or have already been made into films. On A Clear Night, a family Christmas feature aimed at a Hallmark Channel-type audience, is currently in the works. Steven can be reached at Steamroller138 (a) gmail.

Reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, August 29, 2016

Wide O – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by KP Mackie

Laptop-Shorts

Wide O

Lock your doors.

Anticipation is vital to horror stories. Remember how you felt watching Marion step into the shower in Psycho, Brody toss chum off the boat in Jaws, or bag boy Norm walk outside the supermarket in The Mist? That little niggle inside telling you that something doesn’t feel quite right. Something’s about to happen. Like a coiled rattlesnake ready to strike!

In the short script Wide O, that uneasy feeling is present as well – from the moment Ms. All American Mom shuts off a news program, being watched by her two pajama-clad youngsters. It’s a story about a brutal suburban massacre. Definitely unfit for innocent eyes.

The kids protest the action. They can’t sleep – it’s too cold. Mom realizes the house is drafty, and promises to make them hot chocolate. She heads to the kitchen, and discovers the source of that chill…

In most horrors these days, the violence slaps audiences in the face. Wide O is bloodless. But supremely effective: a little one page gem that nurses that itch of terror inside you – making the hairs stand up on the back of your neck…

Horror directors take note: Wide O’s not likely to be on the market long. No blood, no mess. One location. Just an intelligent script with a strong ending. Best to snap it up before it’s gone.

About the writer: Robert Newcomer recently received his first IMDB credit for another short, Them That’s Dead.  An intelligent writer, he has several other shorts and a horror feature length available for consideration. (IMDB credits listed here.) Other shorts of Robert’s (both horror) reviewed at STS include:

A Mighty Fire

Someplace Nice and Dark

Pages: 1

Budget: Extremely low. A living room and kitchen’s all you need. And a handful of actors (including extras for the “news” broadcast.)

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Original Script Sunday for August 28th - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page are fifteen original scripts for your reading pleasure.

– Don

Thursday, August 25, 2016

I Can See You – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

 

Laptop-Shorts

I Can See You

While delivering the mail, a joyless postal worker begins to see messages in the form of graffiti, then the seemingly harmless words take a dark turn.

There’s something about quirky scripts that’s just – charming.  Both to indie audiences and script reviewers.  Think about it: Juno.  Scott Pilgrim Saves the World.  Napoleon Dynamite.  Seven Psychopaths. Sure, raw drama has its place. But write something with character and a touch of mystery?  When done right, the result is magic… a film that’ll stay with your viewers long after the lights have gone up and the curtain down.

A solid example of that genre, I Can See You tells the tale of sad sack mail worker Carson Fox. Beaten down by life, Carson lives with his no-good brother Frank and Shelby (Frank’s too-good-for-him wife.) Though secretly crushing on Shelby, Carson knows he has no chance.  But Carson’s fate is about to change.  Assigned a new postal route, Carson starts to see strange signs… cryptic messages painted on the sidewalk and walls. Telling him how to win Shelby. Urging him towards other – darker – things.  Has Carson finally gone postal? Or is there meaning behind the madness?

Written with a subtle, humorous touch, I Can See You offers the best of what “quirky” has to offer. A unique premise and memorable/relatable characters.  What more can you ask for in a script?

About the writer: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at brainfluffs.com.  Marnie’s had 5 shorts produced (so far) and placed Semi-final with her features in Bluecat.

Pages: 15

Budget: Medium.  There’s a variety of indoor and outdoor settings in this one… but not all that many characters.  And definitely nothing that requires FX.  Still – it’s not a script that an absolute newbie should attempt.  This one requires a touch of artistic experience.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

22 Miles to Trenton – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

22 Miles to Trenton
Penny races to Grover’s Mill to save her sister from impending doom.

Where were you when Kennedy got shot?
Where were you on September 11th, 2001?
Where were you when the Berlin Wall came down?

If you were sentient enough at the time, you can answer these questions instantly.

But did you know that to many Americans, it once seemed like October 30th, 1938 would become an unforgettable date?

Take Penny Connors, for example: the 15-year-old comic book and sci-fi loving protagonist of 22 Miles from Trenton.

A small town New Jersey girl with an adventurous imagination, she’s nothing more than a weird loner according to Veronica, her older (and more socially “normal”) sister.

But there’s no time for these two siblings to trade insults; Veronica’s got a party in Grover’s Mill to attend!

Home alone in 1938, there’s nothing for Penny to do but listen to the radio. Yet – what she hears on the live news this fateful night wouldn’t sound out of place in one of her comic books.

A strange object’s fallen to Earth. Unknown entities are emerging from its shell. And the location of this alien phenomenon is…

PENNY
(to herself)
Grover’s Mill…

Terrified but determined, Penny grabs her bicycle and sets off on a rescue mission to save her sister, meeting fellow adventurers along the way.

While all of them are determined to discover the truth, the truth is also determined to hide itself from them; until they’re up against … possibly the most monumental event humanity has ever faced!

Will Penny rescue her sister? Will this experience bring the siblings closer together? Or will Penny and Veronica be torn apart…permanently? Or literally?

Partially based off true events, Trenton is a thrilling and well-paced script that offers outer space sized creativity to a director and their team in terms of shots and style.

Combine this with a simple and inspiring message, and you’ve got yourself a sure-fire winner. One that – like what happened at Grover’s Mill for reals – will truly stand the test of time!

Pages: 18

Budget: Not bad at all. Just find a rural area, and go from there!

About the Reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the Writer, Michael Field: Been writing for 20 years. I started doing little skit shows with my friends right out of high school and eventually moved on to making a feature film with them (Save the Forest, 2003). From there, it’s been shorts, a couple web series, a book and tons of scripts.

I’m always writing or talking about writing. Recently, my feature script, “Kiddo“, was a quarter-finalist for the Nicholl Fellowship. I’m currently developing a web series comedy, “Life Ends at 30.” as well as working on several new writing projects.

Trust us: you want to meet Michael. Email him at mdfield “AT” me.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Monday, August 22, 2016

F*ck, Fight, F*ck – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Fight, F*ck, Fight
Relationships are… complicated. Or are they?

Warning – Adult Material. Duh.

Some relationships thrive on open and honest communication. Others are fueled by shared interests and some… well, some run on sex.

Such is the case with the couple in F*ck, Fight, F*ck written by talented scribe (and cheeky title writer) Corey Wilcosky. Rachel and Scott, a young married couple, have a relationship that consists of… everything the title of the script suggests and not much more.

At first glance, their relationship seems fine. But under the surface, tensions run hot:

– Scott wants children, Rachel’s not so sure.

– Rachel doesn’t like the stray cat they’ve taken in. Scott’s in love with their new hair ball.

– And so on. The marital conflict grows.

Yet, whenever the two fight it always ends the same way…

Lots and lots of angry make-up sex. Then everything’s (temporarily) OK.

That is, until Scott accidently burns his *ahem* nether regions with a blow drier (you’ll have to read the script to imagine that sight!). Which forces the couple to forgo sex for two months.

Of course, this seems like the worst thing that could happen. Scott and Rachel find themselves aghast at the thought of actually having to talk to each other. Can the lovers also be… friends?

Maybe not. But perhaps yes.

And maybe – abstinence will prove to be a blessing in disguise; just what they needed all along!

Pages: 18

Budget: Medium to high. Two main characters, but several other small roles. Several settings and a cat. This one needs a director who doesn’t mind making an R-rated short, but, in the right hands, this could be a powerful and funny meditation on modern relationships. And if one implies rather than directly shows – it COULD maybe make PG 13!

About the Reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the Writer: Corey Wilcosky is a graduate from a small Jesuit College in Ohio. Using that wholesome Catholic education to the best of his abilities, Corey fulfilled his parents’ wishes and moved to LA to pursue a career in writing dick jokes for the screen and TV. Over his time studying Screenwriting at the American Film Institute, Corey’s screenplays and TV pilots have been finalists in numerous festivals and competitions that include the ScreenCraft Comedy Awards, Creative World Awards, and the LA Comedy Festival. He can be reached at  cjwilcosky “AT” gmail!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

 (Not too graphically, of course!)

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Original Script Sunday for August 21st - posted by Don

Over on the Unproduced Scripts page.

– Don

Friday, August 19, 2016

Congratulations to Warren Duncan! - posted by wonkavite

Shootin’ the Shorts is thrilled to announce that Warren Duncan’s thriller/horror short – Hannah’s Demons – has been picked up for production by award winning director Tyna Ezenma.

You know what that means, right? We’re bound to see even more great things from Warren soon!

About the author: My first short, Lullaby, was picked up for production by Sinister Films two days after appearing on Simply Scripts. Filming will start later next month. For more information about my work, I can be reached at Warren_Duncan “AT” hotmail

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Daysleeper – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Daysleeper
A determined salesman attempts to sell life insurance to a vampire.

The history of Dracula and vampires on film almost dates back to the invention of the movie camera itself. The classic silent film “Nosferatu” and Bela Lugosi’s 1931 original “Dracula” began Hollywood’s love affair with a legion of blood sucking cinematic tales.

Then, somewhere along the way, some studio head thought, why can’t Dracula be funny? So, in 1948 Universal Pictures dug up Bela Lugosi to reprise his iconic Dracula in the comedy “Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein.”

Since then, there have been slews of vampire comedies: including “Dracula Dead and Loving It,” “Love at First Bite,” and of course, the hilarious “Twilight” trilogy.

Which brings us to the newest vampire comedy, Daysleeper written by John Cowdell.

Peter is an insurance salesman determined to sell Vincent, obviously a vampire, the deluxe life after death policy.

Boy, did you pick the wrong house, Pete!

Vincent tries, to no avail, to convince Peter he simply has no need for life insurance. He’ll be literally dealing with those premiums forever, with no final payday.

But, being the stubborn, don’t-take-no-for-an-answer salesman he is, Peter talks himself into Vincent’s lair.

Not to mention, just in time for lunch.

Daysleeper is a light and fluffy take on the vampire genre. Directors of both horror and comedy can surely sink their fangs into this one.

Pages: 4

Budget: Low. One minor FX shot with a floating toothbrush. And you may have to dig up a coffin from somewhere. You might even consider doing this one as an animated short!

About the Reviewer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, and this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

About the Writer, John Cowdell: I have been writing short scripts for over ten years. Most recently I have been reviewing films and TV as well as creating video content for Squabblebox.co.uk, and can be reached at iommi80 “AT” yahoo.co.uk

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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