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Friday, April 29, 2016

Congratulations to Pia Cook – Initiation Optioned! - posted by wonkavite

Please join us in a hearty cheer to writer Pia Cook.  Her short script Initiation has been optioned (and in fact, is now in post)!

Not that this is any surprise: Born and raised in Sweden, Pia Cook has SEVERAL produced features and shorts to her name – full IMDB credits here. She started writing screenplays in 2006 and has written over seventy short screenplays and ten features. (Yeah… that’s not a typo. Seven ZERO.)

And – knowing Pia – there’s plenty more where that came from.

Directors seeking their next project are urged to contact Pia at  Gatortales “AT” gmail, and check out another of her reviewed shorts here:

Fit (Comedy): A “Biggest Loser” contest turns into a case of one-upmanship that gets wildly out of hand.

Truth or Dare (Horror): We all have our secrets….

Hero’s Gift (Drama): A young boy learns that not all presents come in a box with a fancy wrapper. Some of the best presents are not even wrapped at all.

The Riding Hood’s Creed (Horror): Lonnie was supposed to just take her back to Grandma’s house. But something overcame him along the way.

Heart of Coal (Horror): A renowned female psychologist ruminates over serial killer personalities – and the horror they’ve wreaked on her life…

Old Wounds (Drama): A down and out loser gets an unexpected letter in the mail.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Out of Character – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Out of Character
Screenwriter Jack creates characters that live and breathe… maybe TOO much?

Ever watch Will Ferrell films? Well, there’s one particular flick you should see. It’s called
Stranger Than Fiction – a tale about a man named Harold Crick, who discovers one day that he is in fact a character in one of Emma Thompson’s novels. (Yes, Emma Thompson the actress – known in certain circles as Nanny McPhee.) Fortunately, Harold Crick’s a gentle soul; despite the wringer Emma puts him through, he’s pretty harmless all the way.

But what if a character you wrote was far more dangerous and… unhappy with their fate? What would they do to their creator? By Final Fade Out, would YOU be safe?

That’s the very question screenwriter Jack faces in R.E. McManus’ twisty short Out of Character: when one of his shadiest characters arrives at his doorstep – armed, angry, and brimming with demands.

When Character opens, Jack’s writing in his claustrophobic unorganized study – surrounded by empty pizza boxes, half-finished cups of coffee and writer’s manuals galore. (A scene all too real for some writers.) Just then, the doorbell rings. Jack answers – and finds himself face-to-face with… a man named Ken. There’s a pistol in Ken’s hand. Strangely familiar features on his face.

Ken forces his way inside.

Tense bantering ensues – until the stranger-than-truth reality is revealed. Ken’s one of Jack’s characters – disgruntled and demanding change! According to Ken, Jack created him a bit too fat. A lot too poor. And with too much attitude to let such things slide. Using his revolver to do the talking, Ken insists that Jack give him a thinner waistline, a better car, and a supermodel girlfriend as well (can you say ‘join the club’?)

But can Jack do such things, and shove all creative integrity aside?

We won’t spoil the ending – promise. But needless to say, the tension rachets up quick. Jack attempts to comply with Ken’s milder demands, but conspires to take down his creation… before the plot gets too wild…

Equally humorous and tense, Out of Character is a great comedic dark script, stuffed with Easter Eggs for directors and writers alike. Grab it before someone writes YOU off. And the next time you compose a scene? Think real careful about Flat Slob #2’s feelings. Maybe it’s not wise to piss him off that much.

Budget – Low. Two actors, one location (a house), one computer and one gun.

Pages – 9

About the reviewerMitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts) offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts “AT” gmail and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer:

R.E. McManus was born in England, of Irish roots. Hence he was always a little confused. He has since travelled the globe, and noted what he saw on his travels. He’s been writing since he could pick up a pen. The fact they were IOUs is neither here nor there.

He fell in love with film when he first saw 2001: A Space Odyssey at the age of six. Although he’s still not sure about the spelling of Odyssey. It’s still looks wrong,

He loves Fincher, Hitchcock and Kubrick. And Faith No More. And Elvis. He even has a dog named after him. This seemed like a good idea until he went to the park.

Want more information? (Just say yes – you know you do!) Then head over to his website at http://rendevous.yolasite.com. Or email him directly at redarcy2000 “AT” yahoo.co.uk

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Time Lines – Short Script Review (Available for Production!) - posted by wonkavite

Time Lines
Sometimes, it’s best to let life pass you by…

Remember the Bill Murray movie Groundhog Day? If not, shame on you. But here’s the classic tale you’ve somehow let slip away:

Groundhog’s a film about a dude forced to relive the same day over and over and over – until…. well, that would be a spoiler. So we’ll leave the final scene blank for now.

Time Lines, written by versatile scribe John Hunter, is Groundhog Day for 2016. That is, if Groundhog Day was gorier, bloodier and much… gooier, as well.

That’s no knock on the story. In fact, it’s a compliment. Only four pages long, Time Lines nails a darkly comedic tone and keeps you guessing through each scene, as you race.

Here’s the basic premise; young protagonist James goes about his daily routine – resulting in an extremely unusual (and disturbing) day. Our narrative begins as James drives to work. He runs a red light and… gets demolished by a truck. Seconds later, time seems to rewind. James misses the truck and makes it to work. That’s encouraging, right? But then he steps out of his car… and gets flattened by a speeding van. So on and so forth: the tragedies keep unfolding and reversing. Will his miserable day never end?

Which leads to the true mystery of this script: what’s the secret behind what’s happening? Time Lines’ll keep you guessing until the end. Even after you read the final words, somethings remain “open to interpretation”, as they say…

Take our recommendation to heart: if you’re an experienced director looking to make your mark, Time Lines is a special tale. One that could potentially play great on the festival circuit – especially with the right cast/crew. Grab this one while it lasts. Remember, you only live once! (Unless you’re Bill Murray, then you live 12,403 times. A special thank you to Obsessed With Film for the precise number of days Bill Murray suffered through in Groundhog Day).

Budget: Moderate to high: a couple of car accidents, one tragic equipment failure (make of that what you will). Also to be depicted: an assault rifle attack (a weapon of any sort could probably be substituted here.). But don’t let that stop you, or James – remember, there are many ways to make effects work on a budget. Don’t ask me how, I’m just a writer – but stock footage and magic may suffice. You’ll also need lots of fake blood: this one’s messy (in a good way!). As for actors, there’s only one major role. And you can probably get by with just two extras (one man and one woman) on the side.

Settings – A highway, a parking lot, an elevator, and an office building/break room.

Pages: 3

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts) offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts “AT” gmail and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer, John Hunter: I am an award-winning and produced writer. Please visit http://www.networkisa.org/profile/1001989/John-Hunter to see a short bio and list of my scripts available for production. My email is x32792 (AT) yahoo.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Congratulations to Michael O’Farrell – Geoff Optioned!! - posted by wonkavite

Please join STS in a round of applause to Michael O’Farrell – whose satirical comedy (and goofball gem) Geoff has now been optioned to Director Vivek Kolli.

Want to contact Michael and see what else he has available? Ring him up at Michael.ofarrell “AT” knology DOT net! Quick – before the next script gets away! 😛

About the writer: Michael O’Farrell is a mathematician who worked on the Space Shuttle Program and now writes fiction. Stories that obviously “add up” and get grabbed…

Monday, April 25, 2016

Wishbone – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by Dane Whipple

Wishbone
Make a wish.

Snap! With the breaking of a wishbone from a simple chicken dinner, inspirational author Nick is sent down an alternate reality.

As an author, Nick has served as an inspiration to many a reader. Recently, though, Nick could use some inspiration himself. You see, he’s been down on his luck ever since a car accident took his wife, Chloe. Riddled with guilt and haunted by dreams (and perhaps his future self),

Nick contemplates just how he has ended up at this low point. But is there another way?

Enter Kat. Kat has just moved into Nick’s building, and it seems she has a past that haunts her as well. As their friendship grows, the parallels between Kat and Chloe become undeniable, and the line between fantasy and reality begins to blur. What unfolds is a dreamlike romance that defies reason and even time itself. All of this builds to an unforgettable finale that you’ll never see coming.

Filled with surreal imagery in the tradition of Vanilla Sky and Shutter Island (hey, if it’s good enough for Scorsese, it’s good enough for you!), Wishbone deftly delivers the kind of weighty rumination that continually garners accolades on the festival circuit. It is a confident, considerate, contemplation of life, and the choices we make, with a ponderous political pitch. Think Déjà Vu meets The Dead Zone. This is one script that will keep audiences and critics intrigued, entertained, and ultimately satisfied.

What more could you wish for? And – as collectors of Monkey Paws are well aware – be careful what you wish for, too.

Pages: 23

Budget: Medium. Mainly because of script length. A scene involving a wrecked car may require some savvy directorial skill.

About the Reviewer: Dane Whipple comes in a little glass vial. A little glass vial? A little glass vial. He is currently working on that screenplay everybody keeps talking about: The Wild Age. Contact him at dane.whipple (AT) live.com

About the writer: Jeremy Storey has been writing on-and-off for the last fifteen years. He’s dabbled in stage plays, screenplays and shorts. He even wrote a novel once, but the less said about that effort, the better. He’s had a few things produced along the way – a feature (REWIND), two shorts (GOOD DEEDS and ADRIFTING) and a play (LAST CUP OF SORROW). He’s even done quite well in a number of screenwriting contests over the years. However, it’s the process of writing and collaborating on creative projects with likeminded folks that really makes him happy and content. He’s delighted to be asked to participate in Simplyscripts, and is genuinely looking forward to connecting with other writers, producers and directors. Contact him at jeremystorey “AT” yahoo!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sunday, April 24, 2016

The Scripts of the One Week Challenge - posted by Don

We had this challenge. Write a short script in a week. This past week writer’s were challenged to tell his/her own superhero story.
Topic: Superheroes
Genre: Comedy

Check them out!

Friday, April 22, 2016

Speaking Test – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by LC

SPEAKING TEST
Granted, Safeer’s English “not good”, but neither is his examiner.

The job interview has a long history with filmmakers. There’s terrific raw material to be mined especially in the comedy genre. Just take a look at Owen Wilson hamming it up in You, Me And Dupree, Monty Python’s skit The Lion Tamer with John Cleese and Michael Palin; Big Keith’s Appraisal in The Office, and Kevin Spacey’s turn in American Beauty – ‘would you like smiley-fries with that’?

In reality, job interviews are seldom easy and always challenging. Preparation is essential, as are nerves of steel. It’s essential to put your best foot forward. After all this is high-stakes stuff – this is your life, your future. More often than not you get one chance to make that all important first impression.

In Speaking Test, Manolis Froudarakis’ main character, Safeer, is determined to impress. A foreign national from an undisclosed country he has an extra challenge to overcome – English is evidently not his first language. Safeer’s applying for a job as a private investigator. He’s worked at the job successfully in his own country for the past four years. Now all he has to do is pass a test for ‘oral proficiency’ or rather, overcome the language barrier and convince the powers that be that he is indeed the man for the job.

This is no easy feat, especially when The Examiner is a man named Colton – a condescending, obnoxious, prejudiced and racist upstart who does little to disguise his disdain for Safeer by reacting to his test answers with a series of smirks, sneers and guffaws. He continues by stereotyping Safeer and ultimately rejecting his application.

SAFEER
(baffled)
My English good?

Colton laughs even harder. Safeer gulps.

SAFEER
Please, please! … Good detective is
important. Me, I search good, I
find many things.

COLTON
So you could find another
job, if necessary, right?

SAFEER
Other job?

COLTON
You know, like… in a restaurant…
(slowly, with exaggerated gestures)
Plates. Glasses. Water. You wash.

With those final words the interview is over and Safeer is shown the door. Little does Colton know however that by ignorantly equating Safeer’s broken English with stupidity he is the one who’s just made a big mistake. Safeer is nobody’s fool and he’s about to prove it by utilizing the very talents for which he’s just been passed over. Oh, such sweet irony.

Filmmakers: Want a cleverly plotted comedy with an equally powerful message? One that delivers with a terrific punchline guaranteed to have your audiences laughing in the aisles?

Well, don’t delay. Apply now! We predict this one will have applicants lined up around the block.

* We also recommend you read this imagining the role of Safeer being played by the late great Peter Sellers, the author’s inspiration for the character. Alternately, Sacha Baron Cohen would also do the trick. J

Budget: Minimal: yet more reason to interview and “hire” this one!

Pages: 5

About the reviewer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She has also worked professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She is thrilled her first ever entry (Simpatico) into a Screenplay Comp – The LA Comedy Festival ‘Short’ screenplay division took out Top 3 Finalist and hopes the high placing will be a continuing trend. Libby would love to see her words come to life on screen. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail

About the writer: Manolis Froudarakis has won two awards in short screenplay competitions. His main focus is comedy – preferably, comedy with a little edge. You can contact him at: mfroudarakis@yahoo.gr

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Tattooji – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by Zach Zupke

Tattooji
An abusive boyfriend gets his comeuppance when he has a new tattoo inked.

We’ve all seen them. Hell, most of us have been in them. Relationships that just make absolutely no sense. When you’re on the outside, it’s like watching a car wreck in slow motion. You’re there on the corner, watching them scream toward the center of the intersection from opposite directions. You know the outcome is going to be gruesome, but you can’t look away.

Screenwriter Anthony Cawood’s “Tattooji” is just such a screenplay, one readers (and soon, viewers) cannot look away from. He expertly gets us into the story late, after much of the damage has been done by 20-something Ben, who has a propensity for poor decisions and excessive drinking.

Ben’s excess is on full display as he exits a tattoo parlor and heads to the bar. It’s a brilliant intro quickly painting his shortcomings: usually the tattoo parlor comes AFTER you’ve had too much to drink. This guy’s such a mess, he doesn’t need booze to make bad choices.

After he gets on a good drunk, he makes an awful choice: arrives home bragging to his girlfriend about his new purchase.

BEN
… newest bloody thing they’d got.

He’s clearly drunk.

KAITLIN
Which is good?

BEN
Course, it’s fucking amazing.

Very drunk.

KAITLIN
And?

BEN
What?

KAITLIN
How much?

He reveals he paid 400 quid for the tattoo, which is a one-inch emoji that changes and becomes different emojis. His admission accelerates her anger and the tension quickly builds as she needles him for not only this decision, but many he’s made in their relationship. And the fact she’s not been able to treat herself to anything.

KAITLIN
I worked forty six hours this week,
taking shit from idiot punters for
every single minute of every hour.

BEN
But —

She pulls on her unkempt hair.

KAITLIN
Not had my hair done in six months.

BEN
Yeah —

KAITLIN
Or been out with my mates.

BEN
Me —

KAITLIN
Or had any type of treat, you whining little shit!

That gets Ben to his feet and the chase is on toward their violent ending. Again, you knew it wasn’t going to end well. And it doesn’t.

With a deft director guiding two strong and fearless actors, this short will definitely play well. And the extremely-limited budget (an apartment and a temporary emoji or five) will give all a smiley face – despite the eventual crash.

Pages: 6

Budget: Minimal. And a tiny amount of makeup (or animation done in post.)

About the reviewer: Zack Zupke is a writer in Los Angeles. Zack was a latch-key kid (insert “awww” here) whose best friend was a 19-inch color television (horrific, he knows). His early education (1st grade on) included watching countless hours of shows like “M*A*S*H,” “Star Trek” and “The Odd Couple” and movies like “The Godfather,” “Rocky” and “Annie Hall.” Flash forward to present day and his short “The Confession” was recently produced by Trident Technical College in Charleston, SC. He’s currently working on a futuristic hitman thriller with a partner and refining a dramedy pilot perfect for the likes of FX. You can reach Zack at zzupke “at” yahoo.

About the writer, Anthony Cawood: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE (AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!)

Find more scripts available for production

This screenplay may not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Congratulations to Jason Allen – Lotsa Stuff Optioned and In Production! - posted by wonkavite

Please join the team at STS in congratulating Jason Allen for yet more optioned shorts!

Jason’s had quite a bit optioned through Shootin’ the Shorts. Though as much as we love hamming it up in the limelight, credit has to go PRECISELY where it’s due.  IE: to the writer whose mind, imagination and dedication to his craft has kept the hits a’ comin’ day by day.

As of now, the following productions are slated for April 2016, in amazingly varied locations:

The Painful Side of the Pillow – optioned by San Francisco-based Once Upon a Thyme Productions.

The Man From Everywhere – to be shot in NYC

I Swear – due to curse up a blue streak in Jolly ‘Ole England

Falcon Ridge – picked up for Indiana production

Feel the need to join the crowd?  Well, you should.  So check out these other scripts by Jason.  They’re still available… for now.

The Putt Putt Preacher – (Mockumentary) – For Father Mahoney, it’s not just a game…it’s an act of God. And, a religious calling has never been funnier. Just recently voted BEST short screenplay at the GA Milledgeville Film Festival!!

The Seashell (Comedy) – Don’t believe everything you hear. Even inside a seashell…

Madam Lucinda (Comedy)- A young man visits a psychic seeking knowledge about life. But are there hunchbacks, dungeons, transgenderism and werewolves in his future? And is that a bad – or a real good thing?

Jasper & Mimi Forever (Comedy) – The curious tale of Jasper and Mimi, two wild n’ crazy outcasts in love.

About the writer: Jason K. Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, Tennessee. His produced short scripts include AMERICAN SOCK, which won Best Screenplay at the 2014 San Diego Film Awards, and AUTUMN LOVERS, winner of the Audience Award at the 2013 Artlightenment Festival in Nashville. He also wrote the feature film LUCKY FRITZ starring Julia Dietze (IRON SKY) and Corey Feldman. Jason is also a wilderness guide, nature photographer, and published author. See IMDB for his complete credits: www.imdb.com/name/nm3021924

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