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Thursday, February 26, 2015

The Color of War – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

The Color of War

A soldier separated from his family by war explores the ruined shambles of his home

War stories. Whether you’re talking WII films like Twelve O’Clock High, or more SONY’s recent Fury… When you strip them down to their essentials, they’re not about guns, bullets or planes. They’re about people. And how they deal with tragic situations – which tear families and friends apart. Because soldiers are more than “uniforms.” Underneath, we’re all human. And we bleed…

Take for instance, Norman Metcalf: a 30-something soldier in an unnamed war. But whatever’s happened is devastating – massive destruction on American soil.

When the script opens, Norman’s in his old neighborhood… or what’s left of it. Destroyed cars and bodies in the streets. Smoke lingers in the air. And before him – the burned-out shell of his own home. He hears the voices of his wife Rebecca and young daughter Zoe. Echoes of conversations from before the war. Bewildered and confused, he runs inside.

The voices continue as Norman explores the remnants of his life (at least, what can be retrieved from the rubble.) Memories return to haunt him. As do regrets: precious moments with his daughter he blew by; and which will never come again. He reaches Zoe’s room, upstairs. But does he dare go inside…?

War stories. You either love or hate them. But when done right, such stories transcend the genre. The setting; irrelevant – they’re pure drama. Poignant. Heartbreaking. And above all else – human.

About the writer: Rod Thompson is an award winning screenwriter of both features and shorts. His feature, “The Squire” won Best Drama for the 2014 Table Read My Screenplay contest, and he has placed numerous times for his shorts at MoviePoet.com. His short scripts “Gimme Shelter” and “A Memory in Winter” have both been optioned through their exposure on SimplyScripts.com’s “Shootin’ The Shorts.” He is also “the most humble man alive.”

Pages: 6

Budget: Mid range. Some of the destruction of war can be implied. Find a desolate area, and one ruined house – and the rest of it will fall in line.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

All My Love (Stuffed) – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

All My Love (formerly “Stuffed”)

A wronged woman takes a scorched earth approach to her revenge.

Warning – Graphic Violence

Love can make one do insane things.  Buy tokens of affection no normal person could afford. Run singing and skipping through torrential rain.  And when love eventually sours – as it often does –  people get even more crazy.  Begging. Pleading. Stalking.  And that’s just normal stuff; par for the course.  But sometimes folks get… well, unhinged.

Take Brian and Angie as a case study.  Married in the 80s: poofy hair. Happy smiles.  But when the script opens in present day, the decades have done their damage.  By the time we meet Angie, she’s a mess. Dry chewing anxiety pills like M&Ms.  Clearly, a woman on the edge.  And that’s putting it mildly.  Brian’s done something to wrong her. And you know what they say about a woman scorned.

Normally, teasers for scripts are wonderful things. But it’d be wrong to describe what happens next.  Let’s just say it’s bloody, and leave it at that.  Sick. Disturbing to the max.  And dog lovers need not apply.

Though thoroughly violent, All My Love’s oddly not gratuitous.  Rather, it’s a disturbing study into how badly a mind can warp, when robbed of the one thing it truly loves.  A deranged mix of drama and horror – AML really leaves it’s bloody mark.

About the writer: Anthony Cawood is an award winning screenwriter from the UK with four shorts produced, two in post production and another 10 short scripts optioned/sold.  He’s just finished his first feature script and is about to start writing a low budget horror feature for a producer in LA.  You can find out more at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk

Pages: 7

Budget: Pretty low.  Lots of blood, and you’ll need some… er… props.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Code Black – Bonus Feature Length Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Code Black

 A gung-ho firefighter’s life is turned upside down when his daughter is kidnapped by a vicious mobster – who wants her heart to save his father’s life.

Remember when Die Hard arrived in theaters? (Or for those a bit younger – the first time you saw it on DVD?) An electrifying movie, from the very first scene. It’s a film with all the right ingredients: a character you care about – John McClane. Fighting for something worthwhile: his family. Thrown in a do-or-die situation, with Professor Snape as the bad guy? That’s some amazing stuff right there. An entertainment recipe destined to never get old.

And that’s the problem with some action thrillers these days. They keep the FX. The violence. The gore. But they forget you have to root for the good guy. We mean, really empathize. ‘Cause if you don’t, then the movie becomes just a string of pretty explosions. You gotta care what the character’s fighting for.

Which brings us to Code Black’s Graham Harris. 43 and divorced, his body’s seen far better days. He’s coasting over middle-aged hill, with the other side firmly in view. Which is unfortunate for someone in his line of work. He’s a firefighter: one of the gung-ho kind. Which means he’s constantly getting into work related scrapes… a habit that worries his teen daughter, MacKenzie. And if anything could make Graham retire, it’s her. For him, MacKenzie’s the most important thing in the world.

Unfortunately, others see her value as well. Namely, a certain Southern gentleman named Cabot. Cabot’s a vicious, murdering (yet ever-so-polite) son of a bitch. And the son of someone quite dangerous: Lincoln Sadler (63). Head of the most notorious crime family in the business. You see, Lincoln’s got a bad ticker, with a unique blood type. And MacKenzie’s the perfect match.

And Cabot’s hit upon the perfect plan. Kidnap local cardiac surgeon, Dr. Lambert, along with her family. Arrange for MacKenzie to have an “accident”, and end up in emergency. Then it’s just a matter of declaring the teen brain dead, and making the gory organ switch. Voila – a brand new Lincoln Sadler, good as new. Sure, it’ll take a bit of finessing. But it beats risking the Mexican black market scene.

But Cabot’s missed one important factor – Graham. A father who’ll fight for his daughter – to the death. Which might just be the price he’ll have to pay. Alerted by Dr. Lambert’s strange behavior, a suspicious Graham uncovers the plot; just as Cabot’s goons swarm the hospital. The building goes into lockdown – and everything else goes to hell.

Because now the clock is ticking. Can Graham survive Cabot’s hall-roaming death squads – in time to save his daughter’s life?

Mostly limited location, Code Black’s got what indie thriller directors look for. Tons of action, guns, and blood. And – most importantly – memorable characters to root for. ‘Cause you gotta love the good guy to cheer him on. You got a leading actor that’s the next Bruce Willis? Then have him try on Graham Harris for size!

About the writer, Matt Thompson:

Once, while in the midst of a scathing review of a whodunit slasher spec that labeled Matt as anti-American and pro-terrorist due to a seven line monologue that painted a combat vet as a potential suspect, a reader nevertheless described his writing as ‘generally competent.’

Matt has worked hard to live up to that standard ever since.  Tell him how much he’s failed at writerlog “AT” gmail.com, or @AssortedMatt on Twitter.  Or – even better – write to Matt and let him know if Code Black’s got your directorial name on it….

Pages: 100

Budget: Not minimalistic. There is a fire fighting scene at the beginning. A car crash, and a helicopter to requisition. But once the action starts flowing, the hospital setting is all you’ll need.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Monday, February 23, 2015

Grave Love – Short Script Review (Available for Production) - posted by wonkavite

Grave Love

A man tends to his garden at midnight, but something more sinister is at play.

 Never underestimate the importance of intelligent dialogue and pacing – even in a horror script. Sure, you can throw a monster in. Sprinkle loads of blood and gore on top. But the true essence of horror isn’t FX. Or facile jump scares. It’s the slow, skillful building of suspense. And finding the characters interesting enough that you care what happens next…

Meet John. A gardener. Handsome. A GQ fantasy from a school girl’s dreams. When we first meet John, he’s hard at work – tilling the soil, planting seeds. Spectactor Tom watches from the sidelines… equally cute and dressed to kill.

And full of snarky commentary. Which starts with the plants – but doesn’t end there. As with all good dialogue, there’s a rich vein of subtext. And this undercurrent’s mighty dark. What went wrong in their relationship. Tom analyzing John’s fatal flaws. Seems like the school girl’s bound for disappointment; the two bicker back and forth like an old divorced couple. Which, basically, they are.

John ignores Tom’s nasty barbs – moving from daisies to sunflowers. Tom asks his ex who that was for. Which is when Robert steps from the shadows. Young. Rugged. Gorgeous. Well, except for the gaping ax wound across his face, that is. Which is when Tom adjusts his collar; exposing deep strangulation marks.   Looks like when John ends a relationship, he really seals the deal.

John ceases puttering, and moves over to an empty grave. Yet more men join the Greek chorus – chiming in with comments galore. Has John’s conscience finally gotten the best of him? They take bets on how he’ll off himself… Gun, knife. Perhaps pills?

John puts a knife to his neck, and faces his tormentors. True, he may be dead soon – but at least he won’t have to listen to them anymore!

But best laid plans always go awry. Even in the best tended gardens….

A dark and smartly written script, Grave Love has a ton of things going for it. Memorable characters. And just one location – with terrific atmosphere. Horror directors, jump on this one. Or someone else will surely snatch it away!

About the writer: Vladimir Jovanovski can be reached at vjcinend “AT” Yahoo!

Pages: 7

Budget: Pretty low. One location – basic gore FX. Save your money for creepy actors!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Sunday, February 22, 2015

Best Adapted and Best Original Screenplays - posted by Don

Best Adapted Screenplay (and best acceptance speech) – Graham Moore

The Imitation Game – undated, unspecified draft script by Graham Moore (based on “Alan Turing: The Enigma” by Andrew Hodges) – hosted by: The Weinstein Company – in pdf format

Based on the real life story of legendary cryptanalyst Alan Turing, the film portrays the nail-biting race against time by Turing and his brilliant team of code-breakers at Britain’s top-secret Government Code and Cypher School at Bletchley Park, during the darkest days of World War II.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

Best Original ScreenplayAlejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Jr., Armando Bo
Birdman – undated, unspecified draft script by Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Jr., Armando Bo – hosted by: Fox Searchlight – in pdf format

Riggan Thomas, once known quite well to movie theater goers as an iconic super hero called “The Birdman” had recently turned down a fourth installment of the franchise. Now washed up, he attempts to reinvent himself as a director by staging a new retelling of a classic Broadway dramatic play called “What We Talk About When We Talk About Love”. The events leading up to the Saturday night premiere prove to be one disaster after another as the original lead actor is injured while on set and Riggan scrambles to find a replacement, but the replacement proves to be exactly who he needs – a method actor who takes the job way too seriously. But Riggan has a hard time juggling between the set, his replacement actor, his equally washed up daughter, and a host of other disasters that prevent a proper staging of the play. Meanwhile, a New York Times critic who Riggan has to woo threatens to shut down production of the play before it even starts with a scathing review of the opening night …

Information courtesy of imdb.com

If course, read other Nominated Screenplays.

2015 Oscar Nominated Screenplays - posted by Don

Final WB has come through and posted Inherent Vice and American Sniper.

Below are the scripts to the nominations for Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay posted by the studios. All scripts posted by the studios for award consideration can be found here.

Adapted Screenplay

American Sniper – undated, unspecified draft by Jason Hall (based on the book by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice) – hosted by: Warner Bros – in pdf format

The Imitation Game – undated, unspecified draft script by Graham Moore (based on “Alan Turing: The Enigma” by Andrew Hodges) – hosted by: The Weinstein Company – in pdf format

Inherent Vice – August 7, 2013 final shooting draft script by Paul Thomas Anderson (based on the novel by Thomas Pynchon – hosted by: Warner Bros – in pdf format

The Theory of Everything – November 2013, shooting script script by Anthony McCarten – hosted by: FocusGuilds – in pdf format

Whiplash – undated, unspecified draft script by Damien Chazelle – hosted by: Sony Classics – in pdf format

Original Screenplay

Birdman – undated, unspecified draft script by Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Jr., Armando Bo – hosted by: Fox Searchlight – in pdf format

Boyhood – undated, unspecified draft script by Richard Linklater – hosted by: IFC Films – in pdf format

Foxcatcher – undated, unspecified draft script by E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman (Story by E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman and Bennett Miller) – hosted by: Sony Classics – in pdf format

The Grand Budapest Hotel – undated, unspecified draft script by Wes Anderson (story by Wes Anderson and Gugo guinness) – hosted by: Fox Searchlight – in pdf format

Nightcrawler – November 27, 2012 unspecified draft script by Dan Gilroy – hosted by: The Wrap – in pdf format

– Don

Friday, February 20, 2015

Eric Von Heeder’s Blessed – Now Optioned! - posted by wonkavite

Please join STS in a resounding congratulations to Erich Von Heeder, whose reviewed script Blessed is now picked up and in pre-development!

Wanna see what else Erich has available? Because he’s really got some gems. Check out the following STS reviewed shorts and see which one’s a perfect match for you!

Crash Evolution (SF) – A CIA executive comes clean regarding a dubious top-secret project.

Mendelevium (Drama with Humor) – A “Battle of the Bands” helps two lead singers find love.

Good (Drama) – An ex-convict priest attempts to save a neighborhood.

About the writer: Residing in Seattle, Washington, Erich Von Heeder can be reached at erich_vonheeder “AT” yahoo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, February 19, 2015

2911.21 – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by wonkavite

2911.21

A down-and-out squatter seeks refuge in an abandoned house.

Mistakes.  Every one of us makes them, from time to time.  Mostly, they’re smallish things.  Not taking the garbage out, until it smells.  Forgetting a grocery item at the store.  But sometimes, we make real doozies.  Horrifying mistakes that change lives, and can’t ever be taken back.  And when that happens… Things change.  Our lives start a slippery slide down that horrendous hill… And sometimes, that slide doesn’t stop.  Except when you pause to wallow in the guilt.

Jonathan, 30s, knows what that’s like… He’s gone through some rough spots himself.  A gambling problem.  Almost losing his house.  But he’s gotten his act together in recent years.  A man re-dedicated to empathy, he spends his time on charity. Helping feed the poor. Watching over children in the neighborhood.

So when he spots a homeless man, Teddy, squatting in the abandoned house across the street, Jonathan’s natural instincts kick in.  He invites Teddy to stay the night, gives the man beer, and a meal to eat.  The two settle to a simple groove – complete strangers learning a bit about each other, and enjoying the camaraderie.

But is this meeting accidental?  Or has Jonathan just made the biggest mistake of his life… Letting a dangerous man walk in his door…. In the name of empathy?

Written by veteran writer Mark Lyons, 2911.21 (the Ohio code for Criminal Trespass) is a study of many things.  Mistakes, compassion, and – ultimately – forgiveness.  It’s a script that really hits home, custom made for drama directors that are serious about their craft.

About the writer: Mark Lyons is a screenwriter from Youngstown, Ohio. He’s written several scripts, most notably ‘Best Film’ award winner “God’s Empty Acre”, which was filmed as ‘Girl(s)’, at the 2013 Winter Shorts Film Festival and Best Drama at the 2013 World Independent Film Expo. He has also written the feature “Thistles” which was a Quarter-Finalist in the 2013 Bluecat Screenwriting Competition and the short “Ginger” which was a Finalist at the 2013 Shriekfest Film Festival. He can be reached at markielyons “AT” yahoo

Pages: 14

Budget: Not particularly expensive.  Two primary actors.  Suburban setting.

 

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Sham’s The Doll got made and is an official selection for NY Scary Film - posted by Don

Sham’s script The Doll (4 pages, pdf format) has been made.

Some presents don’t like to be wrapped.

And, it is an official selection for the NY Scary Film Award. Check it out! You will have to register, but it is quick and easy.

Discuss this script on the Discussion Board

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