SimplyScripts.Com Logo

Friday, May 30, 2014

Notes from a Veteran Writer – A Million Ways to Lose Money as a Writer – Part Two* (P.J. McNeill) - posted by P. J. McNeill

A Million Ways to Lose Money as a Writer – Part Two

 

(Note: This entry was originally supposed to be a direct continuation of the last entry and explain the time I lost 400 or so dollars trying to make it in film. By the time I got to that portion of the story, I realized I had already written quite a bit. In an effort to keep these posts reasonably-sized, that story will have to wait until next time. Just imagine this as a bridge to the next story, because it will pick up right when I got to LA.)

I moved out to Los Angeles in 2008, unemployed and ready to start working. Problem was, I didn’t really know whereto find a job, let alone a writingjob. I realized I had absolutely no clue how to find work as a writer, as I came to LA with no connections and no leads on work. So I made the first mistake (of many) right out the gate: I turned to Craigslist and looked for any work in film. In my mind (and in the minds of a lot of wide-eyed, wishful thinkers venturing out to the Golden state), it was important to simply find a job in film and the rest would follow. Pre-production, production, post-production: it was all the same in my mind. It was one big world of film, and I just needed to get inside. The rest would follow.

What followed was 6 years working at a post-production house, gaining absolutely no access whatsoever into my field. (Any access I achieved would be done on my own time.) Don’t get me wrong: the job was great. I excelled quickly, was promoted numerous times, earned a good salary, and most importantly: I got to work with big studio films. It was hands-down the most glamorous, exciting, and bizarre job I’ve ever held. (I could write an entire book on that job alone.) When I was sitting in the lobby for my interview (pinball machines to my right, cappuccino machines to my left), a guy skateboarded around me multiple times, while talking on his cell phone. Having come from a background in government work, I couldn’t comprehend what kind of boss would let their employees skateboard around the office. Turns out he was the boss. So, that’s the kind of environment I was entering.

Over the years I made a lot of connections. I can’t even count the number of times someone would say to me “If you ever need a job or a recommendation, let me know.” But here’s the problem: they were all in post-production. No one could help me make the leap to where I really wanted to go. Sure, I was climbing the ladder, but I was climbing the wrong ladder. I was doing all the work I should have been doing as a PA or a writer’s assistant, but I was doing it in post. And I’m not going to lie: at a point I felt trapped. I had invested so much time in the post-production job, that it seemed horrifying to me to start back over in another sector of film. Was I really willing to quit my current job and go work for $10/hour, doing menial tasks at outrageous hours with a family to support? No. I wasn’t.

It’s hard for me to tell you to do otherwise, because I would probably do the same thing again. When you have a family, it’s really hard to weigh anything else against that. So, I can’t say “Take a risk! Quit your job.” But I can say to exercise caution before you leap into a particular field that’s unrelated to what you want to do. Examine what that position can do for you now, and what it can do for your future.

And most importantly: don’t think of film as one big, all-encompassing field. Think of it more like a bunch of little islands, with really bad communication between one-another. But I guess I can’t really complain. My island had a pinball machine.

About the writer: A talented writer and 10 year veteran of the industry, “P.J. McNeill” has seen it all (and he’s ready to kiss and tell.) Got a question, a comment or just general bile /praise you want to spew? Email PJ at pjscriptblog@gmail.com. New to P.J. readership?  Click here for more articles!

** STILL not related to Seth MacFarlane in any way, shape or form

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Leaving Las Vegas screenplay - posted by Don

Leaving Las Vegas – February 8, 1994 unspecified draft script by Mike Figgis (adapted from the novel by John O’Brian) – hosted by: Daily Script – in pdf format

Ben Sanderson, a hard-core alcoholic, drives to Las Vegas after being fired from his film production job and divesting himself of all possessions. He plans to drink himself to death within four weeks. He meets Sera, a prostitute; they fall in love and he moves in with her. Each pledges not to try to change the other’s chosen destiny, and they carry on a romance over Ben’s last weeks.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More Scripts on the Movie Scripts page.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

10,000 B. C. screenplay - posted by Don

10,000 B. C. – January 23, 2006 unspecified draft script by Roland Emmerich & Harald Kloser (revisions by Roland Emmerich & Harald Kloser & Matthew Sand (Revisions by John Orloff (Current Revisions by Robert Rodat))) – hosted by: Daily Script – in pdf format

A prehistoric epic that follows a young mammoth hunter named D’Leh’s journey through uncharted territory to secure the future of his tribe. When a band of mysterious horse-riding warlords raid the Yaghal camp and kidnaps his heart’s desire – the beautiful Evolet along with many others, D’Leh is forced to lead a small group of hunters south to pursue the warlords to the end of the world to save her. Driven by destiny, the unlikely band of warriors must battle saber-toothed cats and terror birds in the Levant.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More Scripts on the Movie Scripts page.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Empire of the Sun screenplay - posted by Don

Empire of the Sun – undated, unspecified draft script by Tom Stoppard (based on the novel by J. G. Ballard) – hosted by: Daily Script – in pdf format

Based on J. G. Ballard’s autobiographical novel, tells the story of a boy, James Graham, whose privileged life is upturned by the Japanese invasion of Shanghai, December 8, 1941. Separated from his parents, he is eventually captured, and taken to Soo Chow confinement camp, next to a captured Chinese airfield. Amidst the sickness and food shortages in the camp, Jim attempts to reconstruct his former life, all the while bringing spirit and dignity to those around him.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More Scripts on the Movie Scripts page.

Features Invade Shootin’ the Shorts - posted by wonkavite

Features Invade Shootin’ the Shorts
(aka ‘Drum Roll, Please’)

Folks, I’d like to talk a few moments to talk about Shootin’ the Shorts. Its mission plan. Its hopes and dreams. Its plans for the future and moving out of our parent’s basement, now that high school is over, and college looms around the corner. Assuming we get that acceptance letter from State U… Well, you know generally what we’re talking about.

From the beginning, STS has had its eye on one goal: to provide indie filmmakers a go-to site for finding high quality scripts that are ready for prime-time. And to provide the writers of those scripts the exposure and platform they need to get to those filmmakers. In other words, a dating matchmaker service for films. And we’re well on our way. Since STS went live a few months ago, we’ve had short scripts optioned, and played a part in connecting directors with promising writers. We’ve landed a great columnist in industry veteran PJ McNeill, and have plans for other notable connections just on the horizon…

Which means it’s time for the next step in STS’s evolution. Features.

Yeah, yeah… we know what you’re thinking. Shootin’ the SHORTS. Slight disconnect on the name, isn’t it? Well – not really. STS has its name due to the focus on shorts. But that’s not its exclusive goal. Because there are SO many high quality feature lengths out there. Indie scripts deserving of exposure… which never get seen, due to lack of connections and the all-powerful studio slush pile. We’re looking to change that. Now.

Starting June 1st (and every first of the month thereafter), STS will be reviewing a feature length script. Handpicked. High quality. Something you’d better jump on before the studios do. Eventually – as the site grows – we expect to graduate to semi-monthly, then weekly. But we suggest you start reading now. Or you’re gonna miss some real gems!

As for you writers out there… Do you have a script that’s damned near perfect, that just hasn’t reached the right desk yet? Submit to us at the link below for showcase consideration. And let’s see what we can do.

http://simplyscripts.com/submit_your_script-sts.html

When submitting, don’t forget to include a URL link to your script.

 

Naughty – Short Script Review (Optioned!) - posted by wonkavite

Laptop-Shorts

Naughty

Santa Claus visits the home of a very naughty girl.

Wow.  The logline for this one sounds like the start to a million different Men’s Magazine articles, doesn’t it? And yes – there are certain aspects to this script that are a touch – shall we say Salacious?  Blue? Dare we venture… even a tad bit Naughty?

That said – this script rises (tee-hee…I just said “rises”) above the obvious – delivering an intelligent, humorous little riff as to the dangers of role playing…especially on Christmas Eve.  One could argue that there’s nothing gratuitously crude in this one – even the wonderfully giggle-worthy montage that writer David Troop offers up near the end.

So – “unwrap” this script and give it a spin.  And if you like it, “shoot” off an email to the author.  It’s time to start makin’ some videos…  Talented amateurs and pros welcome to apply…

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

Pages: 7

Budget: Very low.  Depending on how realistic one wants to get with Puddin’ McSprinkles, the raunchy elf…

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT

**REMEMBER – I’M MODERATING THIS. SO BEHAVE YOURSELF**

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Sunday, May 25, 2014

Original Script Sunday - posted by Don

On the Unproduced Scripts page there are fifteen original scripts for your reading pleasure.

– Don

Breakfast at Tiffany’s screenplay - posted by Don

Breakfast At Tiffany’s – June 22, 1960 Second Draft script by George Axelrod – hosted by: Daily Script – in pdf format

Struggling writer Paul Varjak moves into a New York apartment building and becomes intrigued by his pretty, quirky neighbor Holly Golightly. Holly’s lifestyle confuses and fascinates Paul; in public she flits through parties with a sexy, sophisticated air, but when they’re alone she changes into a sweetly vulnerable bundle of neuroses.

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More Scripts on the Movie Scripts page.

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Get Him To The Greek screenplay - posted by Don

Get Him To The Greek – October 1, 2008 first draft script by Nicholas Stoller – hosted by: Daily Script – in pdf format

English rock star Aldous Snow relapses into drugs and booze after a break up and a disastrous record. In L.A., Aaron Green works for a record company stuck in recession. Aaron’s boss gives him a career making task – to bring Aldous from London to L.A. for a concert in 72 hours. That day, Aaron’s girlfriend Daphne tells him she wants to finish her medical residency in Seattle. Aaron’s sure this ends their relationship. In London, things aren’t much better: Aldous delays their departure several times, plies Aaron with vices, and alternates between bad behavior and trenchant observations. Can Aaron moderate Aldous’s substance abuse and get him to the Greek? What about Daphne?

Information courtesy of imdb.com

More Scripts on the Movie Scripts page.

Search with Google

    Custom Search SimplyScripts

Award Season Screenplays - New!

Featured SimplyScripts Blogs

ScriptSearch


Bullion Poster

Advertisement

More Navigation



Latest Entries

Categories

Script of the Day
March 29, 2017

    Heartbeat by Anthony Cawood

    A florist is asked to help connect an unrequited lover with the object of his affection, with unexpected results. 7 pages
    Discuss it on the Forum

    *Randomizer code provided by Cornetto.

Advertisement

Donate


Advertisement



Writers I dig

Search Amazon

Search Sheet Music


Script Revolution